Monday June 17, 2019
Home Science & Technology Technology us...

Technology used in Netflix and Google can Help Scientists to Determine whether Planetary Systems are Stable or not

Machine learning offers a powerful way to tackle a problem in astrophysics, and that's predicting whether planetary systems are stable

0
//
Technology Giant Google. Pixabay

Toronto, December 2, 2016: Machine learning — a powerful tool used for a variety of tasks in modern life, from fraud detection and sorting spam in Google, to making movie recommendations on Netflix — can help scientists determine whether planetary systems are stable or not, a study says.

“Machine learning offers a powerful way to tackle a problem in astrophysics, and that’s predicting whether planetary systems are stable,” said study lead author Dan Tamayo from the University of Toronto Scarborough in Canada.

NewsGram brings to you current foreign news from all over the world.

Machine learning is a form of artificial intelligence that gives computers the ability to learn without having to be constantly programmed for a specific task. The benefit is that it can teach computers to learn and change when exposed to new data, not to mention it’s also very efficient.

The researchers found that the same class of algorithms used by Google and Netflix can also tell us if distant planetary systems are stable or not.

The method developed by Tamayo and his team is 1,000 times faster than traditional methods in predicting stability.

“In the past we’ve been hamstrung in trying to figure out whether planetary systems are stable by methods that couldn’t handle the amount of data we were throwing at it,” Tamayo said.

NewsGram brings to you top news around the world today.

It’s important to know whether planetary systems are stable or not because it can tell us a great deal about how these systems formed. It can also offer valuable new information about exoplanets that is not offered by current methods of observation.

There are several current methods of detecting exoplanets that provide information such as the size of the planet and its orbital period, but they may not provide the planet’s mass or how elliptical their orbit is, which are all factors that affect stability, Tamayo noted.

The method developed by Tamayo and his team was published online in the Astrophysical Journal Letters.

“What’s encouraging is that our findings tell us that investing weeks of computation to train machine learning models is worth it because not only is this tool accurate, it also works much faster,” he added.

Check out NewsGram for latest international news updates.

It may also come in handy when analysing data from NASA’s Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) set to launch next year. The two-year mission will focus on discovering new exoplanets by focusing on the brightest stars near our solar system.

“It could be a useful tool because predicting stability would allow us to learn more about the system, from the upper limits of mass to the eccentricities of these planets,” Tamayo said. (IANS)

Next Story

Indians won’t Mind Ads on Netflix, Amazon Prime Video if Given Good Deal, Research Report Claims

Subscription fatigue is not common for users in India

0
Indians, Ads, Netflix
The findings suggest that the online TV consumer in India sees the value in TV content whether they are paying with greater focus and attention. Pixabay

One in three Indians won’t mind seeing ads as they watch over-the-top (OTT) content streaming platforms like Netflix or Amazon Prime if they get a good deal from the vendors, video Cloud services provider Brightcove Inc said on Monday.

While 25 per cent Indians want to pay nothing and watch ads as a trade-off to consuming content, 14 per cent respondents would like to pay a higher fee to be free from ads and a similar number would like an option where they can customise their price and ad packages.

In its annual “Asia OTT Research Report”, conducted with research partner YouGov, the company said 35 per cent of respondents in India might be open to a reduced monthly subscription package that serves ads depending on the price whereas 44 per cent said they would definitely sign up.

This means that nearly 80 per cent of Indian respondents are open to a hybrid model of reduced price subscription video on-demand (SVOD) services with some ad funding.

Indians, Ads, Netflix
One in three Indians won’t mind seeing ads as they watch over-the-top (OTT) content streaming platforms like Netflix or Amazon Prime if they get a good deal from the vendors. Pixabay

The survey polled 9,000 participants across nine countries in Asia, including 1,000 consumers in India.

“The findings suggest that the online TV consumer in India sees the value in TV content whether they are paying with greater focus and attention, or with their money. Indian consumers do not mind seeing ads as part of their shows, especially if they are getting a deal,” said Janvi Morzaria, Sales Director-India, Brightcove.

Nearly 60 per cent of ‘lapsed’ respondents plan to sign-up for OTT services again in the future. Subscription fatigue is not common for users in India as content was the primary driver for their subscription to multiple OTT services.

When asked how much respondents would be willing to pay for OTT services, 37 per cent of respondents stated less than $1 per month, 27 per cent would pay $$1-$4 per month and 16 per cent would pay $5-$9 per month.

Also Read- Just Spending 2 Hours a Week in Nature can Work Wonders for Health, Well-Being

“Nearly 22 per cent of Indian respondents found two ads as an acceptable advertising load per ad break and 13 per cent were open to three ads per break,” said the report.

Offline downloads (42 per cent), access on mobile (42 per cent) and using less data on mobile (40 per cent) were the top three OTT service features most wanted by Indian consumers.

“OTT service providers should make the advertising experience engaging while limiting ad loads per break. Consumers are now willing to watch ads if they have the option to subscribe to a reduced price plan,” said Morzaria.

Indians, Ads, Netflix
While 25 per cent Indians want to pay nothing and watch ads as a trade-off to consuming content. Pixabay

Popular Indian digital service providers like Hotstar, ALT Balaji, Zee5, Voot, BigFlix, Sony LIV, Eros Now — apart from the global giants like Netflix, Hulu and Amazon Prime Video — have flooded the Indian market.

Also Read- US Scientists Find Out Why Some Don’t Choose to Take Shelter During Tornadoes?

There are currently more than 32 online content and video streaming platforms in the country and the market is expected to hit $5 billion by 2023, according to the global management consulting firm Boston Consulting Group (BCG). (IANS)