Tuesday March 20, 2018
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Tesla unveils batteries that can power homes and businesses



By NewsGram Staff Writer

A lot of businesses are leveraging the power of the sun by making use of solar panels. However, most of them are left baffled after the sun sets, largely because they are inept at using solar energy when the sun is not shining.

Tesla motors, an American electric car design and manufacturing company aims to change all that. It has decided to manufacture batteries that store solar energy and serve as a back-up system for consumers during blackouts.

The announcement was made at an event near Los Angeles where Tesla’s Chief Executive Elon Musk said that the move could help change the “entire energy infrastructure of the world.”

This change would be brought about by allowing consumers to get off a power grid or bring energy to remote areas that are not on a grid.

Musk said that Tesla Energy would partner with SolarCity, though more companies are expected to join the fray. The system is known as Powerwall and will begin shipping in the US by this summer.

“If you have the Tesla Powerwall, if the utility goes down, you still have power,” Mr. Musk said.

According to the company, Tesla Energy is a critical step in the mission to enable zero emission power generation.

“The whole thing is an integrated system that just works.”

Analysts say the rechargeable lithium-ion battery unit will be built using the same batteries Tesla produces for its electric vehicles.

The system comes in two units: Tesla will sell the 7kWh unit for $3,000 (£1,954), while the 10kWh unit will retail for $3,500 (£2,275) to installers.

Energy comparison firm USwitch estimates that one kWh can power two days of work on a laptop, a full washing machine cycle or be used to boil a kettle 10 times.

The batteries will be connected to the Internet and can be managed by Tesla from afar.

Customers can connect up to nine battery packs to store larger amounts of power.

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NASA’s instrument to measure Sun’s energy

For instance, spectral irradiance measurements of the Sun's ultraviolet radiation are critical to understanding the ozone layer -- Earth's natural sunscreen

NASA to release two missions focused on moon soon in 2022. Pixabay
NASA's new instrument can measure incoming solar energy. Pixabay
  • NASA’s new instrument can measure Sun’s incoming energy
  • The instrument is called Total and Spectral Solar Irradiance Sensor (TSIS-1)
  • This can help bring in an energy revolution in future

To continue long-term measurements of the Sun’s incoming energy, NASA has powered on a new instrument installed on the International Space Station (ISS).

Solar energy is one of the biggest energy sources in the world.

The instrument, Total and Spectral solar Irradiance Sensor (TSIS-1), became fully operational with all instruments collecting science data as of this March, NASA said.

“TSIS-1 extends a long data record that helps us understand the Sun’s influence on Earth’s radiation budget, ozone layer, atmospheric circulation, and ecosystems, and the effects that solar variability has on the Earth system and climate change,” said Dong Wu, TSIS-1 project scientist at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. TSIS-1 studies the total amount of light energy emitted by the Sun using the Total Irradiance Monitor, one of two sensors onboard.

Also Read: Why is the Sun’s atmosphere much hotter than its surface

This sensor’s data will give scientists a better understanding of Earth’s primary energy supply and provide information to help improve models simulating the planet’s climate.

The second onboard sensor, called the Spectral Irradiance Monitor, measures how the Sun’s energy is distributed over the ultraviolet, visible and infrared regions of light. Measuring the distribution of the Sun’s energy is important because each wavelength of light interacts with the Earth’s atmosphere differently.

Measuring solar energy is one big technological developement. Pixabay

For instance, spectral irradiance measurements of the Sun’s ultraviolet radiation are critical to understanding the ozone layer — Earth’s natural sunscreen that protects life from harmful radiation.

“All systems are operating within their expected ranges,” said Peter Pilewskie, TSIS-1 lead scientist at the University of Colorado Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics in the US. IANS

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