Tuesday August 20, 2019

Thanks to the poor safety standards of India, Death tolls are rising in the mining sector

Coal Mines Act in 1973 was enacted due to this very reason only. Private sector mines were banned due to their poor safety records and now public sector mines are also becoming dangerous.

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Mining tools exhibition, Wikimedia commons
  • India is a producer of 89 minerals and operates 569 coal mines, 67 oil gas mines and 1,770 noncoal mines
  • Between 2009 and 2013, 752 accidents were reported and Coal Mines Act in 1973 was enacted
  • Australia, the US and China  has implemented standard operating procedures (SoPs) to counter accidents

Though major safety standards have been introduced in the Indian mining sector but still a lot needs to be taken care of. Every 10th day some sort of mining fatality is happening in our country. Digging deeper into the case, more specifically every 3rd day on an average some accidents take place in the coal mining sector. All these repercussions lead to the fact that mining is considered to be the most dangerous profession in India.

Officials claim that the numbers are declining. On paper, it may seem comforting that for extracting 100 million tonnes of coal, 7 lives were lost on an average in 2015. The majority of the mishaps that takes place are due to strata fall (roof falls or collapse of side walls). Our economy demands more and more output from the mining sector. This directly builds pressure for re-evaluating the safety standards of those toiling deep in the bowels of the earth.

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Same is the case with other developing countries such as China, Brazil. Death tolls are rising at a significant scale. Senior officials employed by world’s largest coal mine sector, coal India Ltd, concede that “Official numbers could be much lower than the actual deaths that take place deep inside the mines.”

Safety standards should be implemented in mining sectors, Wikimedia commons
Standard safety standards should be implemented in mining sectors, Wikimedia commons

India is a producer of 89 minerals by operating 569 coal mines, 67 oil gas mines and 1,770 noncoal mines and several other small mines. This forms a source of employment to about 1 million people on a daily average basis. This also contributes to about 5 % of the national GDP (Gross Domestic Product). But the fact that failures occur in the mining industry is an indication of our poor safety standards. We need to learn from countries like Australia, the US and China where standard operating procedures (SoPs) have been implemented.

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According to Official of Directorate General of Mines Safety (Ministry of Labour and Employment), In India 752 accidents have been reported between 2009 and 2013 due to the fatalities in the mining operations. Coal Mines Act in 1973 was enacted due to this very reason only. Private sector mines were banned due to their poor safety records and now public sector mines are also becoming dangerous.

Though the problems of Indian mine worker cause accidents, miners are also exposed to a number of hazards that adversely affects their health. The problem of inadequate compensation is another factor that as documented in the report by the Parliamentary Standing Committee on safety in coal mines.

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-by Pritam

Pritam is an engineering student and an intern at NewsGram. Twitter handle Pritam_gogreen

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People in India Get the Best Good Night’s Sleep: Survey

Sleep quality, patterns, and duration may vary among countries, but one thing’s clear – people still aren’t getting enough sleep, it noted

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sleeping

When it comes to quality sleep, India has astonishingly come on top — followed by Saudi Arabia and China — among the most restful populations where people get the best good night’s sleep.

The survey, conducted online by global market research firm KJT Group on behalf of Philips among 11,006 adults ages 18 and older in 12 countries, found that roughly 62 per cent of adults worldwide feel that they don’t sleep well when they go to bed.

The worst on the chart is South Korea, followed by Japan for poor sleep habits.

On average, adults globally sleep only 6.8 hours per night during the week and 7.8 hours per weekend night.

Rather than getting the recommended eight hours each night, more than six in 10 adults sleep longer hours on the weekend to catch up on sleep (63 per cent), the findings showed.

More than 4 in 10 adults say their sleep has gotten worse in the past 5 years, compared to only 26 per cent who said their sleep has gotten better and 31 per cent of adults saying their sleep hasn’t changed.

Canada (63 per cent) and Singapore (61 per cent) are the two countries with the highest reports of worry/stress impacting their sleep, said the “Philips Global Sleep Survey” 2019.

Lifestyle factors are crucial determinants when it comes to an individual’s sleep. The top five reasons around the world were worry/stress (54 per cent), the sleep environment (40 per cent), work or school schedule (37 per cent), entertainment (36 per cent) and a health condition (32 per cent).

Sleep, Mental Health, Students
Insufficient sleep is associated with a wide range of mental health issues. Pixabay

Sleep is finally being recognized as a key contributor to an individual’s overall health and wellbeing.

Losing just one or two hours of sleep per night can have the same impact on motor and cognitive functions as going without sleep for a full day or two.

“However, adults across the globe deal with various health and lifestyle factors that can stand in the way of them getting the best night’s sleep,” said the survey.

Among those who live with a spouse or partner, 35 per cent of women either only occasionally, frequently or never sleep in the same bed as their partner who snores.

Six in 10 global adults experience daytime sleepiness at least twice per week.

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Nearly 67 per cent of global adults reported they typically wake up at least once during the night.

Adults in India (36 per cent) and the US (30 per cent) were the most likely to sleep with a pet in their bed, said the survey.

Sleep quality, patterns, and duration may vary among countries, but one thing’s clear – people still aren’t getting enough sleep, it noted. (IANS)