Saturday May 25, 2019

Thanks to the poor safety standards of India, Death tolls are rising in the mining sector

Coal Mines Act in 1973 was enacted due to this very reason only. Private sector mines were banned due to their poor safety records and now public sector mines are also becoming dangerous.

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Mining tools exhibition, Wikimedia commons
  • India is a producer of 89 minerals and operates 569 coal mines, 67 oil gas mines and 1,770 noncoal mines
  • Between 2009 and 2013, 752 accidents were reported and Coal Mines Act in 1973 was enacted
  • Australia, the US and China  has implemented standard operating procedures (SoPs) to counter accidents

Though major safety standards have been introduced in the Indian mining sector but still a lot needs to be taken care of. Every 10th day some sort of mining fatality is happening in our country. Digging deeper into the case, more specifically every 3rd day on an average some accidents take place in the coal mining sector. All these repercussions lead to the fact that mining is considered to be the most dangerous profession in India.

Officials claim that the numbers are declining. On paper, it may seem comforting that for extracting 100 million tonnes of coal, 7 lives were lost on an average in 2015. The majority of the mishaps that takes place are due to strata fall (roof falls or collapse of side walls). Our economy demands more and more output from the mining sector. This directly builds pressure for re-evaluating the safety standards of those toiling deep in the bowels of the earth.

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Same is the case with other developing countries such as China, Brazil. Death tolls are rising at a significant scale. Senior officials employed by world’s largest coal mine sector, coal India Ltd, concede that “Official numbers could be much lower than the actual deaths that take place deep inside the mines.”

Safety standards should be implemented in mining sectors, Wikimedia commons
Standard safety standards should be implemented in mining sectors, Wikimedia commons

India is a producer of 89 minerals by operating 569 coal mines, 67 oil gas mines and 1,770 noncoal mines and several other small mines. This forms a source of employment to about 1 million people on a daily average basis. This also contributes to about 5 % of the national GDP (Gross Domestic Product). But the fact that failures occur in the mining industry is an indication of our poor safety standards. We need to learn from countries like Australia, the US and China where standard operating procedures (SoPs) have been implemented.

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According to Official of Directorate General of Mines Safety (Ministry of Labour and Employment), In India 752 accidents have been reported between 2009 and 2013 due to the fatalities in the mining operations. Coal Mines Act in 1973 was enacted due to this very reason only. Private sector mines were banned due to their poor safety records and now public sector mines are also becoming dangerous.

Though the problems of Indian mine worker cause accidents, miners are also exposed to a number of hazards that adversely affects their health. The problem of inadequate compensation is another factor that as documented in the report by the Parliamentary Standing Committee on safety in coal mines.

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-by Pritam

Pritam is an engineering student and an intern at NewsGram. Twitter handle Pritam_gogreen

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India PC Market Shrinks 8% in Q1, HP Sells Most

Dell Inc retained the second position with a 25.9 per cent market share with a YoY growth of 2.2 per cent

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HP India
HP unveils 65-inch gaming display with soundbar at CES 2019. Flickr

With a market share of 28.1 per cent in the first quarter of 2019, HP Inc maintained its leadership position in the Indian personal computing (PC) market, which shrunk for the third straight quarter, the International Data Corporation (IDC) said on Thursday.

The market witnessed a year-on-year (YoY) drop of 8.3 per cent with shipments reaching 2.15 million units in the first quarter of 2019, said the report.

Despite maintaining its leadership position in the market, HP Inc saw a 9.7 per cent YoY decline, mainly due to consumer segment that shrunk 21.3 per cent over the first quarter of last year.

Dell Inc retained the second position with a 25.9 per cent market share with a YoY growth of 2.2 per cent and a quarter-on-quarter (QoQ) growth of 26.7 per cent.

HP
HP. (IANS)

Lenovo remained at third position with a market share of 25.2 per cent in Q1 of 2019 in India traditional PC market, observing a 6.2 per cent YoY growth and a 29.2 per cent sequential growth.

The India PC market remained weak outside big commercial deals due to weak consumer demand, high inventory from previous quarters and supply issues for Intel chips, IDC said.

Also Read- Tech Giant Apple Pledges to Alert Users on iPhone Performance

The notebook category contributing 61.4 per cent of the India PC market shipments witnessed a 9.8 per cent YoY decline. Within notebooks, ultra-slim category, with a 25.3 per cent share of the market, grew 86.5 per cent.

“Spending towards ultra-slim notebooks is increasing due to factors like improved mobility due to thinness of the product and enhanced aesthetics,” Bharath Shenoy, Market Analyst, PCs, IDC India, said in a statement. (IANS)