Tuesday October 15, 2019
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The Count Of Missing People In California Due To Wildfire Goes Down

The cause of the fire is still being investigated but suspicion has fallen on the utility company PG&E

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California, rain, missing
After a brief delay to let a downpour pass, volunteers resume their search for human remains at a mobile home park in Paradise, Calif., Nov. 23, 2018. The team is doing a second search because there are missing people whose last address was the mobile home park. VOA

Authorities have once again lowered the number of people thought to be missing in California’s deadliest wildfire to 25.

Butte County Sheriff’s office said the death toll in the Camp Fire remains at 88. The fire completely obliterated the town of Paradise, home to almost 27,000 people about 280 kilometers north of San Francisco.

On Friday, authorities had said the number of missing stood at 49, down from a high of 1,200 two weeks ago.

California, Fire prevention, wildfires, Insurance, rain
A controlled burn ignites pine trees on the “Rough Fire” — which closed camps east of Fresno at Hume Lake as it crossed Highway 180 — in the Sequoia National Forest in California, Aug. 21, 2015. VOA

Authorities lifted evacuation orders for residents of some communities in the Magalia area, north of Paradise. But people are still barred from entering Paradise itself, the sheriff’s department said.

Also Read: Rain, Snow To Hit California Due To Pacific Storm

The cause of the fire is still being investigated but suspicion has fallen on the utility company PG&E, which has admitted having equipment problems near the origin of the fire around the time it started. (VOA)

Next Story

California to Require Public Universities to Offer Abortion Pills at Campus Health Centers

California's Governor Gavin Newsom on Friday signed the bill into law, which requires the states' 34 universities to offer abortion medication beginning]

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California, Public, Universities
FILE - People rally in support of abortion rights at the Capitol in Sacramento, Calif., May 21, 2019. VOA

California has become the first state to require public universities to offer abortion pills at campus health centers.

California’s Governor Gavin Newsom on Friday signed the bill into law, which requires the states’ 34 universities to offer abortion medication beginning in 2023.

The medication is a first-trimester procedure that involves a woman taking two pills to create an effect similar to a miscarriage.

Newsom’s predecessor, Jerry Brown, who is also a Democrat, vetoed similar legislation last year, arguing that abortion services were “widely available off-campus” and so did not need to be provided by state universities.

California, Public, Universities
FILE – California Gov. Gavin Newsom addresses a news conference in Sacramento, Calif., July 23, 2019. VOA

Democratic Senator Connie Leyva, who sponsored the bill, said in a statement Friday, “Abortion is a protected right, and it is important that everyone, including college students, have access to that right, if they so choose.”

Leyva has argued the bill would help young women who cannot get to outside abortion providers because of transportation or financial obstacles.

The bill has been opposed by religious and anti-abortion groups.

The University of California system has not taken a position on the matter but has raised concerns about the cost of the procedure as well as concerns over security issues related to providing abortions.

Also Read- Light Smoking also Damages Lungs, Says Study

The law does not require California universities to offer surgical abortions, which can be done past the first trimester.

Abortion medication can only be administered during the first trimester. It is different from the morning after pill, which is already available at many university health centers across the country. The morning after pill is taken after sex to block a pregnancy before it begins, while abortion medication ends a pregnancy after it has begun.

California’s decision to increase access to abortion comes at a time when many states are limiting the ability of women to receive abortions, leading to a flurry of legal challenges. Last week, the Supreme Court agreed to review a Louisiana law that opponents say would force most of the abortion clinics in the state to close. (VOA)