Thursday February 21, 2019

The Power Of brain: You Get What You Choose To Focus

If we practise using our imagination to enhance our performance and build our confidence

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The Power Of brain: You Get What You Choose To Focus. Pixabay

The brain can’t process negatives. For example, if I say: “Don’t think of a white elephant,” you will automatically think of a white elephant and visualize it in your mind. If someone buys an expensive pair of glasses and if he is worried about breaking them, it is very likely that he will. If it is a new shirt and you start worrying that you are going to spill some sauce on it, before long, you will spill the sauce and stain your shirt and you will say to yourself, “I knew it! I told you it always happens to me.”

We cannot tell our minds not to do something. Our minds cannot move away from something but only towards it. The problem is that if we concentrate on losing something, the world can make it happen for us. So, rather that imagining the worst, concentrate on what you have. Use your mental energy to focus on how you want things to be, and where you want your life to reach. Focus the mind in a positive direction!

If we practise using our imagination to enhance our performance and build our confidence, our performance will improve and so will we gain confidence. We can run that picture through our minds again and again mentally and rehearse on how confident we really are. Many confident people use this technique all the time. So if it is really so effective, why can’t we do the same and thus increase our confidence level? Speakers, especially, rehearse their speech to attain success before they climb the stage. Artists and athletes do the same and are able to give their best performance. However, when we think that we can’t do something, naturally we will not able to do it.

If we practise using our imagination to enhance our performance and build our confidence
If we practise using our imagination to enhance our performance and build our confidence. Pixabay

Have you noticed that when you decide to buy something, all of a sudden you see a mass of advertisements of that very item, or you may physically see the object. It is not just a coincidence. The mind is turned to that wavelength so the sample has to manifest itself!

Shakti Gawain, the author of Creative Visualisation, says: “Thoughts and feelings have their own magnetic energy which attracts energy of a similar nature.”

Also read: Documentary on “Great Minds on India” Launched

So, the power of the mind when combined with physical action is a very powerful formula for success. (IANS)

 

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Know How Higher Intake of Sodium Can Treat Lightheadedness

Greater sodium intake is widely viewed as an intervention for preventing lightheadedness when moving from seated to standing positions.

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"Health practitioners initiating sodium interventions for orthostatic symptoms now have some evidence that sodium might actually worsen symptoms," Juraschek said. Pixabay

Higher sodium intake should not be used as a treatment for lightheadedness, say researchers challenging current guidelines for sodium consumption.

Lightheadedness while standing, known as postural lightheadedness, results from gravitational drop in blood pressure and is common among adults.

Greater sodium intake is widely viewed as an intervention for preventing lightheadedness when moving from seated to standing positions.

However, contrary to this recommendation, researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Centre (BIDMC) found that higher sodium intake, actually increases dizziness.

“Our study has clinical and research implications,” said Stephen Juraschek, researcher from BIDMC in Boston.

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Greater sodium intake is widely viewed as an intervention for preventing lightheadedness when moving from seated to standing positions. Pixabay

“Our results serve to caution health practitioners against recommending increased sodium intake as a universal treatment for lightheadedness. Additionally, our results demonstrate the need for additional research to understand the role of sodium, and more broadly of diet, on lightheadedness,” Juraschek said.

For the study, reported in The Journal of Clinical Hypertension, the team used data from the completed DASH-Sodium trial, a randomised crossover study that looked at the effects of three different sodium levels (1500, 2300, and 3300 mg/d) on participants’ blood pressure for four weeks.

While the trial showed that lower sodium led to decrease in blood pressure, it also suggested that concerns about lower level of sodium causing dizziness may not be scientifically correct.

Also Read: ‘It Has Been A Very Long Process, But Ultimately A Very Successful Process’: South Korea Agrees to Pay More for U.S. Troops

The study also questioned recommendations to use sodium to treat lightheadedness, an intervention that could have negative effects on cardiovascular health.

“Health practitioners initiating sodium interventions for orthostatic symptoms now have some evidence that sodium might actually worsen symptoms,” Juraschek said.

“Clinicians should check on symptoms after initiation and even question the utility of this approach. More importantly, research is needed to understand the effects of sodium on physical function, particularly in older adults.” (IANS)