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‘This is for Syria’: Man stabs three at London subway station

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London: A man was arrested after he stabbed three people at an east London subway station Saturday evening while screaming “this is for Syria”. The attack at Leytonstone station left a passenger seriously wounded while two others received minor injuries.

Scotland Yard said they were treating the attack as “a terrorist incident”, The Telegraph reported.

Since the murder of fusilier Lee Rigby on May 22, 2013, this is reportedly the first terrorist attack on British soil.

This comes as French President Francois Hollande and British Prime Minister David Cameron have pledged to further cement cooperation to fight ISIS in Syria. Britain has also stepped up attacks on ISIS in Syria, doubling their warplanes.

ALSO READ: Britain steps up attacks on ISIS, doubles warplanes

At around 7 pm (local time) the police help was sought after a stabbing was reported in the ticket tall of the station.

A video shows the assailant appearing to attack a man as police arrived on the scene carrying Tasers.

In the video, the attacker could be heard shouting “this is for Syria” while the police Officers could be heard telling him to “drop it, drop it you fool” before Tasering him.

Even as the man carried out the attack, the panicked and shocked passengers fled the scene. The attacker was eventually tasered and overpowered by the police.

“He was tall and black, wearing a black jacket and a headscarf. It looked like he was attacking people at random, ” an eyewitness said.

“We are treating this as a terrorist incident. I would urge the public to remain calm, but alert and vigilant. The threat from terrorism remains at severe, which means that a terrorist attack is highly likely,” Commander Richard Walton, the head of the Met’s Counter Terrorism Command said.

(Image: Cyprus-mail)

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People Use Hate Speech While Searching About Terrorism on Social Media

People post hate speech while seeking answers on terrorism

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Social Media terrorism
People often resort to using hate speech when searching about terrorism on a community group social media platform. Pixabay

People often resort to using hate speech when searching about terrorism on a community group social media platform, say researchers.

According to Snehasish Banerjee, lecturer at the York Management School, University of York, it appears seems that people are really curious to know about terrorists, what terrorists think, their ideas, etc.

“While portrayed as a threat to society and human civilisation by mainstream media, terrorists sell terrorism as freedom fighting via social networking sites and private messaging platforms,” said Banerjee.

“However, the actual workings of terrorism are largely shrouded in secrecy. For the curious, a convenient avenue to turn to is the community question answering sites”.

Community question answering sites (CQAs) are social media platforms where users ask questions, answer those submitted by others, and have the option to evaluate responses. Previous studies have mainly looked at terrorism-related data drawn from Facebook and Twitter, this was the first to examine trends on the CQA site, Yahoo! Answers.

Social Media terrorism
While portrayed as a threat to society and human civilisation by mainstream media, terrorists sell terrorism as freedom fighting via social media platforms. Pixabay

The University of York study explored the use of Yahoo! Answers on the topic of terrorism and looked at a dataset of 300 questions that attracted more than 2,000 answers. The questions reflected the community’s information needs, ranging from the life of extremists to counter-terrorism policies. Sensitive questions outnumbered innocuous ones.

A typical innocuous question was: Who exactly created ISIS?, while a more sensitive question was: Do you agree with Donald Trump that we should ban Muslims coming from countries seized by ISIS, Al Qaeda and other terrorists? According to the findings, sensitive questions were significantly more likely to be submitted anonymously than innocuous ones.

While no significant difference arose with respect to answers, the paper found that identities were seldom recognisable. Using names non-traceable to themselves, the community group users become embolden to use provocative, inflammatory or uncivil language. “We found that answers were laden with negative emotions reflecting hate speech and Islamophobia, making claims that were rarely verifiable,” said Banerjee.

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Users who posted sensitive questions and answers generally tended to remain anonymous.

“This paper calls for governments and law enforcement agencies to collaborate with major social media companies, including CQAs, to develop a process for cross-platform blacklisting of users and content, as well as identifying those who are vulnerable,” the authors noted in the Aslib Journal of Information Management. (IANS)