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Thousands of Stray Dogs Poisoned to Death by Municipality workers in Pakistan’s Karachi

In this campaign, a total of 1050 dogs were killed and 2000 more is estimated to be the target in the next phase

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Dead dogs. (Representational image). Wikimedia
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Karachi, Pakistan, October 20, 2016: In Karachi, more than a thousand stray dogs have been poisoned to death by the workers of the municipality. An official on Wednesday said the action had to be taken because the complaints of stray dogs biting women and children flooded, and the extermination programme was needed.

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In this campaign, a total of 1050 dogs were killed and 2000 more is estimated to be the target in the next phase.

The chairman of the municipal jurisdiction, Rehan Hashmi said, repeated complaints of stray dogs biting people had been reported to authorities and it was suggested that the extermination programme was essential as because Karachi lacked the resources to re-home the stray dogs or to put them in pounds.

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According to NDTV, Hashmi said, “Had there been some better resources or options, I would love to switch to that. They are living beings after all.”

In Pakistan, animal rights are highly neglected, some handful of activists and veterinary surgeons fight for them, to find out some way between to protect these animals in a population which often for religious reasons considers them as unclean.

Apart from the upper class, there are very few families to keep dogs as pets, while some simply use them to guard their houses. It is disheartening, but the demand for rescuing dogs in the city is very less.

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Conservative figures estimate that the feral dog population of Karachi could be up to 35,000.

According to Isma Gheewala, head of Karachi’s Animal Care Centre, in a year, as many as 15000 dog bites are reported in the city.

– prepared by NewsGram team with inputs from AFP

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  • Ruchika Kumari

    Poisoning them was not a solution. Animals also have right to live there life peacefully. Instead of poisoning them we should provide shelter to dogs.

Next Story

Chernobyl Nuclear Disaster: Stray Dogs Receive Treatment From a US-Based Team of Veterinarians

The dogs survived despite what was called “open season,” when soldiers were allowed to hunt the animals after the nuclear disaster

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Chernobyl
Stray dogs near the ghost city of Prypyat near Chernobyl. RFERL

Chernobyl, August 23, 2017: A Boston-based international animal-welfare group says it is sending a veterinary team to Ukraine to treat dogs near the site of the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear disaster.

The Four Paws group said on August 20 that hundreds of descendants of abandoned dogs in the Chernobyl area are wandering in and around the destroyed reactor and many live in areas with radioactive contamination, including in the ghost city of Prypyat.

The veterinarians will join a group of other experts already in the region to provide rabies vaccinations, medical treatment, and neutering services to dogs living within the so-called “exclusion zone.”

“Due to wild animals who also live within the exclusion zone, the stray dogs are often infected with rabies, posing a risk to people who work at the plant,” the group said.

ALSO READ: Man from Taiwan Builds Wheelchairs for the Injured and Disabled Dogs 

The dogs survived despite what was called “open season,” when soldiers were allowed to hunt the animals after the nuclear disaster, the group said.

“Originally, the dogs retreated to the surrounding woods after the exclusion zone was established, but packs of wolves and food scarcity forced them back to the abandoned city and toward the still-active nuclear plant,” said Julie Sanders, Four Paws international director of companion animals.

“There, the workers began to feed the dogs and they have stayed ever since,” she said.

The explosion and fire at the Chernobyl plant on April 26, 1986, was the world’s worst civilian nuclear accident and has left radioactivity levels high in areas around the plant.

Work has been under way since 2010 to build a massive shelter over the damaged reactor and seal in about 200 tons of uranium thought to be still there. (RFE/RL)