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Threat to Future Political Stability? US Commander Worries about Aid Taliban Receives from Pakistan, Russia and Iran

Moscow is allegedly helping and arming the Taliban in a bid to contain the influence of Islamic State affiliates in Afghanistan

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FILE - U.S. commander in Afghanistan, U.S. Army Gen. John W. Nicholson, speaks during a change of command ceremony at the Resolute Support Headquarters in Kabul, Afghanistan, March 2, 2016. VOA

The “malign influence” of Pakistan, Russia and Iran with the Taliban-led insurgency, and concerns about future political stability of the Afghan government threaten international efforts aimed at stabilizing the war-raved country, warns a top U.S. commander.

“We’re concerned about the external enablement of the insurgent or terrorist groups inside Afghanistan; in particular where they enjoy sanctuary or support from outside governments,” said General John Nicholson, leader of NATO’s Resolute Support Afghan mission.

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He told reporters at the Pentagon Friday, the Haqqani Network of terrorists, which is fighting alongside the Taliban, still poses the greatest threat to Americans, coalition and Afghan partners from its sanctuary in neighboring Pakistan.

Pakistan and Afghanistan, VOA
Pakistan and Afghanistan, VOA

“And the Haqqanis hold five American citizens hostage right now,” Nicholson said. “I think this is worth remembering as we think about the Haqqani Network. And they remain a principal concern of ours, and they do enjoy sanctuary inside Pakistan.”

Pakistani officials, however, insist their security forces have uprooted any infrastructure Taliban insurgents and their allies were using for cross-border attacks, and extensive efforts are being undertaken to secure the porous Afghan border.

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Russia, Iran

Nicholson raised concern about Taliban insurgents’ links to Russia and Iran, saying they are not advancing the cause of stability in the region.

Moscow is allegedly helping and arming the Taliban in a bid to contain the influence of Islamic State affiliates in Afghanistan and prevent it from threatening neighboring central Asian states.

Speaking at a U.N. General Assembly session late last month in New York, Russian envoy Vladimir Safronkov even called for easing U.N. sanctions on the Taliban for promoting peace talks between warring sides.

“So, Russia has overtly lent legitimacy to the Taliban,” Nicholson said.

But he dismissed assertions about the Taliban’s successes against rival IS fighters. Instead, he said, Afghan forces and the U.S. counterterrorism effort are the ones taking on and “achieving the greatest effect” against loyalists of the Middle Eastern terrorist group in Afghanistan.

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“So, this public legitimacy that Russia lends to the Taliban is not based on fact, but it is used as a way to essentially undermine the Afghan government and the NATO effort and bolster the belligerents,” Nicholson added.

Iran and Taliban

The general suggested Shi’ite Iran maintains contacts and influence with the Taliban for similar reasons. He said Afghan officials have engaged both Iranian and Russian governments over the issue.

“We’re hopeful — speaking now as commander Resolute Support — that these outside actors will act in a positive way, so we can work together to help bolster the capability and legitimacy of the Afghan government, not the belligerents,” Nicholson said.

He also called for Afghan leaders to make sure their internal political rivalries do not undermine security efforts in the country.

A lack of electoral reforms, internal rivalries plaguing President Ashraf Ghani’s national unity government, growing political opposition and the recent unseating of several Afghan ministers by an increasingly assertive parliament all have fueled political uncertainty and confrontation.

“And one possible risk of Afghan political instability is a fracture, but we have not seen this happen within the security forces,” Nicholson said. He praised Afghan security forces for prevailing against the resurgent Taliban in the outgoing year and appeared upbeat about their future successes.

“You know, my message to our Afghan partners and members of the political opposition is that we respect your political process, but please don’t allow that process to undermine security gains, which have been made this year at such great cost.” (VOA)

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Afghan Government Protests for Controversial Remarks Received from Pakistan’s PM Imran Khan

Kabul has long accused Islamabad of sheltering and covertly supporting Taliban insurgents, charges Pakistan rejects

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pakistan, imran khan, afghan
FILE - Pakistan's Prime Minister Imran Khan speaks during a news conference in Ankara, Turkey, Jan. 4, 2019. VOA

The Afghan government formally protested controversial remarks attributed to the leader of Pakistan, suggesting an interim “neutral” political setup in Kabul could help further U.S.-led efforts to strike a peace deal with the Taliban.

Afghan Foreign Ministry spokesman Sibghatullah Ahmadi said Tuesday the neighboring country’s deputy ambassador in Kabul was summoned to express “grave objection” over Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan’s “reckless and “irresponsible” remarks.

Ahmadi said the government “deemed such statements an obvious example of Pakistan’s interventional policy and disrespect to the national sovereignty and determination of the people of Afghanistan.”

Kabul has long accused Islamabad of sheltering and covertly supporting Taliban insurgents, charges Pakistan rejects.

“The Afghan peace process can only be successful if there is a neutral interim government, which can hold free and transparent elections to be participated by all the stakeholders,” the Express Tribune Pakistani newspaper Tuesday quoted Khan as telling a group of journalists in his office.

​Khan made similar remarks a week ago when he said that peace was coming to Afghanistan very soon and “a good government” would be in place there to allow “our Afghan brothers” to live in peace. Those comments also had provoked Kabul to summon the Pakistani ambassador and register a strong protest, calling them interference in internal Afghan affairs.

U.S.-Taliban talks

Islamabad takes credit for arranging the ongoing dialogue between the United States and the Taliban to help end the deadly war in Afghanistan. The dialogue meetings are mostly being hosted by Qatar and both sides concluded a preliminary draft agreement in their latest round of 16 days of talks that ended on March 12.

Chief U.S. negotiator Zalmay Khalilzad, however, made clear that a final agreement would be linked to a comprehensive Taliban cease-fire and an intra-Afghan dialogue involving insurgents as well as Afghan government representatives.

afghan, imran khan, pakistan
FILE – U.S. Ambassador John Bass attends a news conference in Ankara, Turkey, Oct. 11, 2017. VOA

“While Pakistan has made constructive contributions on the Afghan peace process, PM Khan’s comments did not,” Khalilzad tweeted.

The U.S. envoy emphasized that it is for Afghans only to decide the future their country. “The role of the international community is to encourage Afghans to come together so they can do so,” he added.

U.S. ambassador to Kabul, John Bass, also attempted Tuesday to dismiss suggestions Washington is discussing with insurgents issues related to future political governance and the current Afghan constitution.

Bass told reporters the recently concluded meetings with Taliban representatives in Qatar have been confined to the fate of an American troop drawdown and U.S. concerns about the prospect of Afghanistan again becoming a safe haven for international terrorism.

“We’re not talking to the Taliban about interim governments, we’re not talking to the Taliban about issues related to the current Afghan constitution and the current structure of government,” Bass said.

The U.S. diplomat stressed these issues are for Afghans and representatives of the government to discuss with the Taliban once an inter-Afghan dialogue is under way.

“Our goal is to help produce a settlement that preserves the gains of the last 17 years, but those are not issues that we can decide and seek to impose on wider Afghan society,” Bass said.

Ghani government excluded

The U.S.-Taliban peace talks have excluded Afghan President Ashraf Ghani’s government because the insurgent group is strongly opposed to engaging in any talks with Kabul. The move has upset Afghan officials from the outset.

Ghani’s national security adviser, Hamadullah Mohib, launched blistering public attacks on Khalilzad earlier this month for allegedly sidelining the government and giving the Taliban legitimacy.

imran khan, pakistan, afghan
FILE – Special Representative for Afghanistan Reconciliation Zalmay Khalilzad speaks at the U.S. Institute of Peace in Washington, Feb. 8, 2019. VOA

Mohib, while speaking to reporters during a visit to Washington, accused the Afghan-born U.S. diplomat of trying to create “a caretaker government [in Afghanistan] of which he would then become viceroy,” a title used for the colonial administrator of British-ruled India.

U.S. ambassador Bass attempted Tuesday to address those concerns and strongly defended Khalilzad.

“I would just note, again, that Ambassador Khalilzad is executing policy and directives from the President of the United States and the Secretary of State as professional diplomats do when they’re in the service of their governments,” the U.S. diplomat noted.

Mohib’s comments outraged the Trump administration and he was quickly “summoned” to the State Department to be told that “attacks on Ambassador Khalilzad are attacks on the department and only serve to hinder the bilateral relationship and the peace process.”

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Washington also reportedly conveyed to President Ghani that his national security adviser would no longer be welcomed in the United States and that American officials would no longer do business with Mohib.

Afghan media has reported U.S. officials left a meeting of NATO ambassadors at Kabul’s presidential palace on Monday when they noticed that Mohib was also in attendance. But neither Afghan nor American officials commented on the reports. (VOA)