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Two hackers claim to have Broken into Seven Indian High Commission Websites

The hackers allegedly leaked details of 161 Indians living in South Africa, 35 in Switzerland, 145 in Italy, 305 in Libya, 74 in Malawi, 14 in Mali and 42 in Romania

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Representational image. Flickr

New Delhi, November 7, 2016: Two hackers allegedly from the Netherlands claimed to have broken into seven Indian High Commission websites, publishing online the login details, passwords and database containing names, passport numbers, email-IDs and phone numbers of people of Indian origin, media reported on Monday.

According to a report in E Hacking News website, the Indian High Commissions where data breach happened are in South Africa, Libya, Italy, Switzerland, Malawi, Mali and Romania.

The hackers with Twitter names Kapustkiy and Kasimierz L later dumped the database on Pastebin.com (which later removed the details).

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“I am from the Netherlands. I’ve found several SQL on their websites and I reported it. But they ignored me so I dumped there db [database],” one of the hackers told E Hacking News in an email.

The hackers allegedly leaked details of 161 Indians living in South Africa, 35 in Switzerland, 145 in Italy, 305 in Libya, 74 in Malawi, 14 in Mali and 42 in Romania.

The Indian Embassy in South Africa (http://www.hcisouthafrica.in/) was the first one to be hacked.

The Indian Embassy in Bern (Switzerland) was the second target (http://indembassybern.ch/) which had three databases with 19 tables with total 35 entries and login details with passwords.

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“The compromised data includes the name, last name, email id, address, college and a course where students are enrolled,” the report added.

In Italy, the hackers entered into three databases with 149 entries, including the name, email-id, telephone numbers and passport numbers.

There was no official explanation from the Ministry of External Affairs on this development.

SQL (Structured Query Language) injection is one of the most widely exploited web application vulnerability used by hackers to steal data from online businesses’ and organisations’ websites.

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This web application vulnerability is typically found in web applications which do not validate the user’s input.

“As a result, a malicious user can inject SQL statements through the website and into the database to have them executed,” www.netsparker.com reported.

Earlier this year, there were multiple reports that websites of seven Indian embassies were hacked and defaced by a group claiming to be from Pakistan. (IANS)

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Thousands Of Disney+ Accounts Hacked And Up For Sale On Dark Web

Hackers have hijacked thousands of Disney+ accounts and put them up for sale on the Dark Web

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Hacked Disney+ accounts
Hackers have hijacked thousands of Disney+ accounts. Pixabay

As Disney garnered over 10 million subscribers for its online streaming service Disney+ on its first day of operation, reports have surfaced on Monday that hackers have already hijacked thousands of accounts and put them up for sale on the Dark Web.

ZDNet discovered several listings for Disney+ accounts on different underground hacking forums, selling for somewhere between $3 and $5.

The Disney+ launch was marred by technical issues and users reported being unable to stream their favourite movies and shows.

Several users reported losing access to their accounts.

“Many users reported that hackers were accessing their accounts, logging them out of all devices, and then changing the account’s email and password, effectively taking over the account and locking the previous owner out,” said the report on.

Disney was yet to comment.

In some cases, hackers gained access to accounts by using email and password combos leaked at other sites, while in other cases “the Disney+ credentials might have been obtained from users infected with keylogging or info-stealing malware”.

Researchers asked Disney+ to help users by rolling out support for multi-factor authentication and prevent more attacks.

Disney+ accounts sold on dark web
The hijacked Disney+ accounts are up for sale on dark web. Pixabay

On the very first day of release on November 12, Disney+ users collectively spent 1.3 million hours streaming and watching the content available to them on the platform for the first day of release.

As per reports, analysts projected that Disney+ would have anywhere between 10-18 million subscribers in its first year. Disney has signed up more than half of those projected numbers in 24 hours.

The service was launched in the US for $6.99 per month or $69 per year.

Also Read- Smart Bulbs Can Steal Personal Information Through Hacking

The company has announced the service will be launched in major European markets, including the UK, France, Germany, Italy, Spain and “a number of other countries in the region” on March 31 next year.

Earlier, Disney had said that it expected to spend about $1 billion in 2020 on original content for the platform and $2 billion by 2024. (IANS)