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Two hackers claim to have Broken into Seven Indian High Commission Websites

The hackers allegedly leaked details of 161 Indians living in South Africa, 35 in Switzerland, 145 in Italy, 305 in Libya, 74 in Malawi, 14 in Mali and 42 in Romania

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New Delhi, November 7, 2016: Two hackers allegedly from the Netherlands claimed to have broken into seven Indian High Commission websites, publishing online the login details, passwords and database containing names, passport numbers, email-IDs and phone numbers of people of Indian origin, media reported on Monday.

According to a report in E Hacking News website, the Indian High Commissions where data breach happened are in South Africa, Libya, Italy, Switzerland, Malawi, Mali and Romania.

The hackers with Twitter names Kapustkiy and Kasimierz L later dumped the database on Pastebin.com (which later removed the details).

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“I am from the Netherlands. I’ve found several SQL on their websites and I reported it. But they ignored me so I dumped there db [database],” one of the hackers told E Hacking News in an email.

The hackers allegedly leaked details of 161 Indians living in South Africa, 35 in Switzerland, 145 in Italy, 305 in Libya, 74 in Malawi, 14 in Mali and 42 in Romania.

The Indian Embassy in South Africa (http://www.hcisouthafrica.in/) was the first one to be hacked.

The Indian Embassy in Bern (Switzerland) was the second target (http://indembassybern.ch/) which had three databases with 19 tables with total 35 entries and login details with passwords.

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“The compromised data includes the name, last name, email id, address, college and a course where students are enrolled,” the report added.

In Italy, the hackers entered into three databases with 149 entries, including the name, email-id, telephone numbers and passport numbers.

There was no official explanation from the Ministry of External Affairs on this development.

SQL (Structured Query Language) injection is one of the most widely exploited web application vulnerability used by hackers to steal data from online businesses’ and organisations’ websites.

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This web application vulnerability is typically found in web applications which do not validate the user’s input.

“As a result, a malicious user can inject SQL statements through the website and into the database to have them executed,” www.netsparker.com reported.

Earlier this year, there were multiple reports that websites of seven Indian embassies were hacked and defaced by a group claiming to be from Pakistan. (IANS)

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Hackers ditch ransomware attacks, move to cryptojacking: Symantec

Mobile users also face privacy risks from grayware apps that are not completely malicious but can be troublesome

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Russia, North Korea and Iran are the most active in hacking financial institutions, while China is the most active in cyber espionage.
Hackers are usig new techniques to rob users' data and money. Wikimedia Commons
  • Hackers are no more using ransomware attacks
  • They are now cryptojacking
  • India is the second largest Asian country which witness this

When it comes to increased cryptojacking activities, India is second in the Asia-Pacific and Japan (APJ) region and ninth globally as hackers create a highly-profitable, new revenue stream with crypto-mining, cyber security giant Symantec said on Wednesday.

According to Symantec’s “Internet Security Threat Report”, detection of coinminers on endpoint computers increased by a whopping 8,500 per cent in 2017.

cryptocurrency dealer Pluto Exchange on Thursday announced the launch of mobile application for transacting in VC. Wikimedia Commons
Coinmining is taking place in high number. Wikimedia Commons

“Cryptojacking is a rising threat to cyber and personal security,” Tarun Kaura, Director, Enterprise Security Product Management, APJ at Symantec, said in a statement. “The massive profit incentive puts people, devices and organizations at risk of unauthorised coinminers siphoning resources from their systems, further motivating criminals to infiltrate everything from home PCs to giant data centers,” Kaura added.

Cryptojacking is defined as the secret use of a computing device to mine cryptocurrency. With a low barrier of entry cybercriminals are harnessing stolen processing power and cloud CPU usage from consumers and enterprises to mine cryptocurrency. Coinminers can slow devices, overheat batteries and in some cases, render devices unusable. For enterprise organisations, coinminers can put corporate networks at risk of shutdown and inflate cloud CPU usage, adding to the cost.

Also Read: From paper to plastic to Bitcoins: Changing money with time

“Now you could be fighting for resources on your phone, computer or Internet of Things (IoT) device as attackers use them for profit. People need to expand their defenses or they will pay for the price for someone else using their device,” Kaura added.

Symantec found 600 per cent increase in overall IoT attacks in 2017. India today ranks among the top five countries as a source for IoT attacks. The firm also identified a 200 per cent increase in attackers injecting malware implants into the software supply chain in 2017.

Hacking puts a lot of things at risk. VOA

Threats in the mobile space continue to grow year-over-year, including the number of new mobile malware variants which increased by 54 per cent. Mobile users also face privacy risks from grayware apps that are not completely malicious but can be troublesome. Symantec found that 63 per cent of grayware apps leak the device’s phone number.

In 2017, the average ransom cost lowered to $522. “Several cyber criminals may have shifted their focus to coin mining as an alternative to cashing in while cryptocurrency values are high,” the report noted. IANS