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Two Tibetan Singers Freed After Serving Four Years For ‘Political’ Songs

Two Tibetan singers jailed for four years for singing politically sensitive songs were released this week in southwestern China’s Sichuan province

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Representational Image. Man in prison.
  • Two Tibetan singers jailed for four years for singing politically sensitive songs were released this week in southwestern China’s Sichuan province after completing their sentence
  • Trinley and Chakdor were first detained in 2012 in Gansu province’s Machu (Maqu) county after producing a CD called “The Pain of an Open Wound” praising exiled spiritual leader the Dalai Lama
  • The two men were then taken to Mianyang prison in Sichuan to serve their sentence, which included the year spent in detention before their trial

 

Tibet, October 9, 2016: Two Tibetan singers jailed for four years for singing politically sensitive songs were released this week in southwestern China’s Sichuan province after completing their sentence, according to a local source.

Pema Trinley, 27, and Chakdor, 35, were freed on Oct. 3 and returned to their homes in Ngaba (in Chinese, Aba) county’s Meruma township, a Tibetan living in the area told RFA’s Tibetan Service.

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“When they arrived in their hometown, relatives, former prison mates, and other supporters gave them a warm welcome by offering ceremonial scarves,” RFA’s source said, speaking on condition of anonymity.

“No details were immediately available concerning the condition of their health,” the source added.

Trinley and Chakdor were first detained in 2012 in Gansu province’s Machu (Maqu) county after producing a CD called “The Pain of an Open Wound” praising exiled spiritual leader the Dalai Lama and Tibetan self-immolation protests challenging Chinese rule in Tibetan areas, the source said.

Tibetan singer Chakdor is shown third from right after his release from prison on Oct. 3, 2016. (BBG)
Tibetan singer Chakdor is shown third from right after his release from prison on Oct. 3, 2016. (BBG)

“They were first held for questioning for six months at the Maqu county detention center, and were later sentenced in 2013 to four years in prison,” he said.

The two men were then taken to Mianyang prison in Sichuan to serve their sentence, which included the year spent in detention before their trial, he said.

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In an earlier report, Tibet’s India-based exile government, the Central Tibetan Administration (CTA) said that prison authorities at Mianyang had refused at first to acknowledge that the two singers were in their custody, “raising their families’ concern about their well-being and whereabouts.”

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CTA also identified Chakdor as the close relative of a self-immolation protester named Choepa, who burned himself to death in August 2012 “to protest against the repressive policies of the Chinese government.”

China has jailed scores of Tibetan writers, artists, singers, and educators for asserting Tibetan national and cultural identity since widespread protests swept the region in 2008. (BBG Direct)

  • Antara

    Four years of imprisonment is quite shocking!!

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Aadhaar Helpline Mystery: French Security Expert Tweets of doing a Full Disclosure Tomorrow about Code of the Google SetUP Wizard App

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Google comes up with a new feature

Google’s admission that it had in 2014 inadvertently coded the 112 distress number and the UIDAI helpline number into its setup wizard for Android devices triggered another controversy on Saturday as India’s telecom regulator had only recommended the use of 112 as an emergency number in April 2015.

After a large section of smartphone users in India saw a toll-free helpline number of UIDAI saved in their phone-books by default, Google issued a statement, saying its “internal review revealed that in 2014, the then UIDAI helpline number and the 112 distress helpline number were inadvertently coded into the SetUp wizard of the Android release given to OEMs for use in India and has remained there since”.

Aadhaar Helpline Number Mystery: French security expert tweets of doing a full disclosure tomorrow about Code of the Google SetUP Wizard App, Image: Wikimedia Commons.

However, the Telecom Regulatory Authority of India (TRAI) recommended only in April 2015 that the number 112 be adopted as the single emergency number for the country.

According to Google, “since the numbers get listed on a user’s contact list, these get  transferred accordingly to the contacts on any new device”.

Google was yet to comment on the new development.

Meanwhile, French security expert that goes by the name of Elliot Alderson and has been at the core of the entire Aadhaar controversy, tweeted on Saturday: “I just found something interesting. I will probably do full disclosure tomorrow”.

“I’m digging into the code of the @Google SetupWizard app and I found that”.

“As far as I can see this object is not used in the current code, so there is no implications. This is just a poor coding practice in term of security,” he further tweeted.

On Friday, both the Unique Identification Authority of India (UIDAI) as well as the telecom operators washed their hand of the issue.

While the telecom industry denied any role in the strange incident, the UIDAI said that he strange incident, the UIDAI said that some vested interests were trying to create “unwarranted confusion” in the public and clarified that it had not asked any manufacturer or telecom service provider to provide any such facility.

Twitter was abuzz with the new development after a huge uproar due to Telecom Regulatory Authority of India (TRAI) Chairman R.S. Sharma’s open Aadhaar challenge to critics and hackers.

Ethical hackers exposed at least 14 personal details of the TRAI Chairman, including mobile numbers, home address, date of birth, PAN number and voter ID among others. (IANS)

Also Read: Why India Is Still Nowhere Near Securing Its Citizens’ Data?