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US criticises Pakistan’s anti-terrorism laws on peaceful Ahmadiyya Community

Pakistani laws do not recognise the Ahmadiyya community as Muslims and forbids them from calling themselves members of that religion

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Muslim community people are condemning violent acts (Representative Image), VOA

Washington, Dec 10, 2016: Pakistan’s crackdown on Ahmadiyya community under the guise of anti-terrorist action has been denounced by the State Department and the Commission on International Religious Freedom (USCIRF).

“We’re obviously very concerned about the reports that Punjab counter-terrorism police have raided the international headquarters of Ahmadiyya — Muslim community in Rabwah,” State Department Deputy Spokesperson Mark Toner said here on Friday.

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According to Toner, the country’s laws that restrict peaceful religious expression, particularly by the Ahmadiyya community, “are inconsistent with Pakistan’s international obligations.”

Pakistani laws do not recognise the Ahmadiyya community as Muslims and forbids them from calling themselves members of that religion. But Toner pointedly emphasised that Ahmadiyya is a “Muslim community”.

USCIRF was harsher in its criticism.

“USCIRF condemns the brutal raid on the Ahmadiyya offices, the first such raid since Pakistan amended its constitution 42 years ago declaring that Ahmadis are ‘non-Muslims’,” said Thomas J. Reese, a Catholic priest of the Jesuit order.

“Pakistan’s anti-terrorism laws should not be applied to the peaceful Ahmadiyya community simply because they are Ahmadis,” he added.

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The USCIRF noted in a statement that Pakistan’s Punjab province, where the raid took place, “has a deeply troubling religious freedom record” with two-thirds of all blasphemy cases originating there.

On Monday the Counter-Terrorism Department raided an office of the Ahmadiyya community and arrested several people for publishing religious publications, Tehreek-e-Jadeed and Al-Fazal that the Punjab government had declared as “seditious and treasonable” in 2014.

During this raid “police beat and arrested several Ahmadis who later were charged under provisions in Pakistan’s penal code and Anti-Terrorism Act”, USCIRF said. (IANS)

  • Anila Sadiq

    There is a long history of persecution of Ahmadi Muslims in Pakistan
    despite the fact that none deserve such treatment. we certainly do firmly believe in our silent prayers for ‘Peace’. We, Ahmadi Muslims always try to spread a peaceful message to all regardless of so-called differences among humanity. We always have and always will keep demonstrating “Love for all, hatred for none”.

  • Anila Sadiq

    There is a long history of persecution of Ahmadi Muslims in Pakistan
    despite the fact that none deserve such treatment. we certainly do firmly believe in our silent prayers for ‘Peace’. We, Ahmadi Muslims always try to spread a peaceful message to all regardless of so-called differences among humanity. We always have and always will keep demonstrating “Love for all, hatred for none”.

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  • Anila Sadiq

    There is a long history of persecution of Ahmadi Muslims in Pakistan
    despite the fact that none deserve such treatment. we certainly do firmly believe in our silent prayers for ‘Peace’. We, Ahmadi Muslims always try to spread a peaceful message to all regardless of so-called differences among humanity. We always have and always will keep demonstrating “Love for all, hatred for none”.

  • Anila Sadiq

    There is a long history of persecution of Ahmadi Muslims in Pakistan
    despite the fact that none deserve such treatment. we certainly do firmly believe in our silent prayers for ‘Peace’. We, Ahmadi Muslims always try to spread a peaceful message to all regardless of so-called differences among humanity. We always have and always will keep demonstrating “Love for all, hatred for none”.

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A Nuclear War Between India and Pakistan Can Pose a Threat To Ocean Life, Says Study

A lingering question is whether the survivors could still get food from the sea

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Ocean
For the study, published in Geophysical Research Letters journal, the researchers looked at how climate changes stemming from nuclear war would affect the ocean life. Pixabay

A nuclear war between India and Pakistan could worsen the impact of ocean acidification on corals, clams, oysters and other marine life with shells or skeletons, says a study.

“We found that the ocean’s chemistry would change, with global cooling dissolving atmospheric carbon into the upper ocean and exacerbating the primary threat of ocean acidification,” said the study’s co-author Alan Robock, Distinguished Professor at Rutgers University in the US.

For the study, published in Geophysical Research Letters journal, the researchers looked at how climate changes stemming from nuclear war would affect the oceans.

They used a global climate model in which the climate reacted to soot (black carbon) in smoke that would be injected into the upper atmosphere from fires ignited by nuclear weapons. They considered a range of hypothetical nuclear wars, including a relatively small one between India and Pakistan and a large one between the US and Russia.

Excess carbon dioxide from the burning of fossil fuels enters the ocean and reacts with water to form carbonic acid, which decreases ocean pH (makes it more acidic) and lowers levels of carbonate ions. Corals, clams, oysters and other marine organisms use carbonate ions to create their shells and skeletons, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

A more acidic ocean makes it harder to form and maintain shells and skeletons. The massive amount of smoke from a nuclear conflict would block sunlight and cause global cooling, the study said.

The cooling would temporarily boost the pH in the surface ocean over five years and briefly lessen the decline in pH from ocean acidification. But the cooling would also lead to lower levels of carbonate ions for about 10 years, challenging shell maintenance in marine organisms, said researchers.

Nuclear, Atom, Bomb, Atomic, Science, War, Radioactive
A nuclear war between India and Pakistan could worsen the impact of ocean acidification on corals, clams, oysters and other marine life with shells or skeletons, says a study. Pixabay

“We have known for a while that agriculture on land would be severely affected by climate change from nuclear war,” Robock said. “A lingering question is whether the survivors could still get food from the sea. Our study is the first step in answering this question,” Robock added.

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The next step is to combine projected changes in ocean chemistry with projected changes in temperature and salinity and assess their impacts on shellfish and fish stocks throughout the oceans, he said. (IANS)