Sunday July 21, 2019

US: Flat Art Museum (FAM) in St. Olaf College exhibits Drawings of Hindu Temple of Angkor Wat

St. Olaf College is a coeducational, residential, four-year, private liberal arts college in Northfield, Minnesota, United States.

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St. Olaf College, Minnesota, Wikimedia

Delhi, Dec 23, 2016: The Flaten Art Museum (FAM) in St. Olaf College (Northfield, Minnesota) is exhibiting drawings exploring Hindu temple of Angkor Wat (Cambodia).

The museum in St. Olaf College is run by Evangelical Lutheran Church in America. The showcasing of these drawings are under the exhibition titled “Anastylosis Project”, which will continue till January 22.

The drawings are by Art Professor Mary Griep of the St. Olaf College. They examine Angkor Wat, which is the largest religious monument in the world. The exhibition refers to the practice of restoring a monument by dismantling and rebuilding the structure using the original methods and materials as closely as possible.

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Activist Rajan Zed urged major art museums of the world, including Musee du Louvre and Musee d’Orsay of Paris, Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, Los Angeles Getty Center, Uffizi Gallery of Florence (Italy), Art Institute of Chicago, Tate Modern of London, Prado Museum of Madrid, National Gallery of Art in Washington DC etc to frequently organize Hindu art focused exhibitions. He claimed that this will help in sharing the rich Hindu art heritage with the rest of the world.

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Rajan also said, ”Art has a long and rich tradition in Hinduism and ancient Sanskrit literature talks about religious paintings of deities on wood or cloth.” Flaten Art Museum has over 4,000 artefacts from all around the world. Larry Stranghoener, David R. Anderson and Jane Becker Nelson are Board of Regents Chair, President and Museum Director respectively.

– prepared by Shambhavi Sinha of NewsGram. Twitter:  @shambhavispeaks

Next Story

Cambodia Returns 1,600 Tons of Plastic Waste Exported from US, Canada

Neth Pheaktra said 70 of the containers were shipped from the U.S. and 13 came from Canada. Both countries are major waste exporters

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Containers loaded with plastic waste are pictured in Sihanoukville Port, southwest of Phnom Penh, Cambodia. July 16, 2019. VOA

Cambodian authorities have announced plans to return 1,600 tons of plastic waste exported from the U.S. and Canada, according to a high-ranking official from the Environmental Ministry.

Inspectors found the waste Tuesday. It was packed in 83 containers unloaded in Sihanoukville, one of Cambodia’s main ports.

Ministry of Environment spokesman Neth Pheaktra told VOA Khmer on Wednesday that “authorities are seeking the companies that smuggled the plastic waste in order to take legal action.”  He added that the waste would be returned “to the country of origin.”

Neth Pheaktra said 70 of the containers were shipped from the U.S. and 13 came from Canada. Both countries are major waste exporters.

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80 percent of the waste found on 93 beaches was plastic. VOA

‘Not a dustbin’

“Cambodia is not a dustbin where foreign countries can dispose of out-of-date e-waste, and the government also opposes any import of plastic waste and lubricants to be recycled in this country,” said Neth Pheaktra.

In the past, Cambodian authorities have found radioactive and film waste arriving in Sihanoukville.  He said the plastic waste found this week was not biodegradable.

Emily Zeeberg, spokeswoman for the U.S. Embassy in Cambodia, said the embassy “is monitoring reports of plastic waste at the Sihanoukville Autonomous Port.”

Zeeberg added that “we have requested additional information and are offering U.S. government assistance to determine both the exporter (country of origin) and the importing entity here in Cambodia.”

Sorn Chey, who works with the Affiliated Network for Social Accountability in East Asia and the Pacific, said the authorities should heed control mechanisms. “This is something that should not take place,” he added.

plastic waste
Scientists: China’s Ban Causes Plastic To Pile Up, Nations Must Reduce Usage. Pixabay

Chinese project

Cambodia’s rejection this week was the latest step in a trash crisis that emerged when China began Operation Green Fence in February 2013. It was aimed at reducing the vast amounts of contaminated recyclables and waste sent to China.

ALSO READ: Mahindra Group Chairman: No More Plastic Bottles at Boardroom Meeting

In January 2018, Beijing banned almost all imports of two dozen types of recyclable materials, such as plastics, mixed paper and electronic waste. Now, unless the materials are clean and sorted so they are unmixed, China rejects them.

Since then, other countries in Southeast Asia that accepted waste have started to turn it away. In May, Malaysia returned 450 tons of plastic waste to the U.S., the United Kingdom, Canada, Japan and the Netherlands. Earlier this month, Indonesia rejected waste from Australia. (VOA)