Thursday August 16, 2018

Using Marijuana can Help in the Treatment of Drug Addiction and Depression: Study

Cannabis use might not be recommended for conditions such as bipolar disorder and psychosis

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Toronto, November 16, 2016: Using marijuana could help some alcoholics and people addicted to opioids kick the habit and may also help people suffering from depression, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and social anxiety, says a study.

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“Research suggests that people may be using cannabis as an exit drug to reduce the use of substances that are potentially more harmful, such as opioid pain medication,” said the study’s lead investigator Zach Walsh, Associate Professor at University of British Columbia’s Okanagan campus in Canada.

The study published in the journal Clinical Psychology Review is based on a systematic review of research on the medical cannabis use and mental health as well as reviews on non-medical cannabis use.

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However, the review concluded that cannabis use might not be recommended for conditions such as bipolar disorder and psychosis.

“In reviewing the limited evidence on medical cannabis, it appears that patients and others who have advocated for cannabis as a tool for harm reduction and mental health have some valid points,” Walsh said.

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It is important to identify ways to help mental health professional move beyond stigma to better understand the risk and benefits of cannabis, Walsh added.

“There is not currently a lot of clear guidance on how mental health professionals can best work with people who are using cannabis for medical purposes,” Walsh said. (IANS)

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Marijuana Considered Safe to Cure Epilepsy in Kids

While the study's authors said the results were significant, they stressed that the purpose of this study was about safety not efficacy

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Marijuana safe to treat epilepsy in kids: Study. Pixabay

Consuming a marijuana-based drug may be safe in treating children with severe epilepsy, results of a clinical trial has showed.

Following treatment with cannabidiol — a non-psychoactive compound found in marijuana — about one in five children were described as much or very much improved from their baseline, while around half reported none, or a very slight improvement, Xinhua news agency reported.

While the trial was conducted on a small group of children with severe epilepsy, it showed that the drug had a manageable side effect profile, but only showed extensive symptom relief for a brief number of patients.

The trial “involved the sickest children with epilepsy — children who are having seizures many times per day, who have been recently hospitalized for their epilepsy, and have failed on average about nine anti-epilepsy drugs before,” said lead author John Lawson, paediatric neurologist at Sydney’s Children’s Hospital.

“The main aim of the study was about safety. We found that there were a few safety concerns but overall those safety issues were very manageable and the drug overall was very safe for the majority,” he added.

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Marijuana leaves. Pixabay

The study was published in the Medical Journal of Australia.

Although legally cannabis must be prescribed by a doctor, recent reports of cannabis derivatives being successful in treating children with epilepsy have led to a number of parents of sick children sourcing their own medical marijuana.

While the study’s authors said the results were significant, they stressed that the purpose of this study was about safety not efficacy.

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The US Food and Drug Administration had recently approved Epidiolex (cannabidiol) [CBD] oral solution for the treatment of seizures associated with two rare and severe forms of epilepsy — Lennox-Gastaut syndrome and Dravet syndrome — in patients two years of age and older. (IANS)