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Vast “digital divide” exists among states: Assocham

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New Delhi: There exists a stark “digital divide” among states, with Delhi having the highest score of 238 percent while Bihar and Assam lag behind at around 55 percent, the Associated Chambers of Commerce and Industry (Assocham) said on Sunday, on the basis of “tele-density” or telephone connections for every 100 individuals.

India may have achieved a significant success in reaching the number of telephone subscribers to over one billion, but the tele-density data points to a stark ‘Digital Divide’ with large populations in Bihar, Assam, Madhya Pradesh and Uttar Pradesh still being deprived to communicate with the rest of the country,

The digital divide is clearly visible between different states with some of the eastern states not finding favour with the telecom service providers. The reasons may vary from the lack of infrastructure like power availability to even indifference in terms of business opportunities,” it added.

Compared to the national tele-density of 81.82 percent, the figure for Bihar is 54.25 percent, Assam 55.76 percent, Madhya Pradesh 62.33 percent and Uttar Pradesh 62.74 percent, the report said.

On the other end, while the tele-density in Delhi is over 238 percent, that of Himachal Pradesh is 123.19 percent. Other states figuring higher on the tele-density scale are Tamil Nadu, Punjab, Karnataka and Kerala.

Assocham said the central government along with the states should double their efforts to ensure that both state-run BSNL, as well as private telecom service providers, should reach the states with low tele-density, otherwise the digital divide could widen.

(Inputs from IANS)

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Demanding Targets Make Employees Sleep Less Than 6 Hours : Assocham

"Depression, fatigue, and sleeping disorder are conditions or risks that are often associated with chronic diseases and have the largest impact on productivity."

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Employees

Nearly 56 percent of corporate employees in India sleep less than six hours a day due to high-stress levels that arise out of tough targets set by their employers, an Assocham Healthcare Committee report said here on Monday.

“Setting of unreasonable and unrealistic targets causes lack of sleep, has wide-ranging effects including daytime fatigue, physical discomfort, psychological stress, performance deterioration, and low pain threshold and even increase absenteeism,” the report said.

Findings of the report pointed out that sleep deprivation costs $150 billion a year due to higher stress and reduced workplace productivity. The work performance pressure, peer pressure, difficult boss — all of this is taking a toll on the physical and mental health of people, it said.

employees
About 46 percent of the Indian workforce suffer from some form of stress, according to the survey. Pexels

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The stress could be related to personal issues, office politics, or performance target issues, it added.

“There is a rising case of metabolic syndrome that includes, diabetes, high uric acid, high blood pressure, obesity, and high cholesterol (in India),” the report said.

About 16 percent of the sample population of the survey claims that they suffer from obesity. Depression was witnessed among 11 percent of the respondents, it said.

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Employees
People suffering from high blood pressure and diabetes comprised of 9 percent and 8 percent of the sample population respectively, as per the report. Pixabay

Spondylosis (5.5 percent), heart disease (4 percent), cervical (3 percent), asthma (2.5 percent), slip disk (2 percent), and arthritis (1 percent) are other common diseases among corporate employees, it said.

“Depression, fatigue, and sleeping disorder are conditions or risks that are often associated with chronic diseases and have the largest impact on productivity.” (IANS)

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