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Video creators will not be able to make money until channel reaches 10,000 views: Youtube

he streaming service opened "YouTube Partner Programme" (YPP) to everyone in 2007 that allows anyone to sign up for the service

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New York, April 8, 2017: For millions of creators, making videos on YouTube is not just a creative outlet, it is a source of income. Announcing a change to its “YouTube Partner Programme”, video creators will not be able to make money until channel reaches 10,000 views.

The streaming service opened “YouTube Partner Programme” (YPP) to everyone in 2007 that allows anyone to sign up for the service, start uploading videos and immediately begin making money.

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“We will no longer serve ads on YPP videos until the channel reaches 10k lifetime views. This new threshold gives us enough information to determine the validity of a channel.It also allows us to confirm if a channel is following our community guidelines and advertiser policies,” said YouTube in a blog post.

By keeping the threshold to 10k views, we also ensure that there will be minimal impact on our aspiring creators. And, of course, any revenue earned on channels with under 10k views up until today will not be impacted, the post added.

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After a creator hits 10k lifetime views on their channel, the company will review their activity against YouTube policies and if everything looks good, channel will be added to YPP and will begin serving ads against their content.

“We want creators of all sizes to find opportunity on YouTube, and we believe this new application process will help ensure creator revenue continues to grow and end up in the right hands,” the post read. (IANS)

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Study Reveals That YouTube Influencers Rarely Disclose Their Marketing Relationships

In addition, they are working on computational methods to detect other types of hidden advertising on social media, including sponsored content and product giveaways, which are less straightforward to identify than affiliate marketing

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YouTube influencers rarely disclose marketing relationships: Study. Pixabay

Even as social media has started playing a very significant role in our decisions, many people who create content to promote products on popular platforms such as YouTube and Pinterest do not always disclose their marketing relationships with the companies, reveals new research.

The study focused on affiliate marketing, in which companies pay a commission to social media figures for driving sales.

Content creators who produce videos, photos and commentary are rewarded when their followers purchase products after clicking on affiliate marketing links included in their social media posts.

Researchers from Princeton University’s Department of Computer Science extracted affiliate marketing links from randomly drawn samples of about 500,000 YouTube videos and 2.1 million Pinterest pins.

They found 3,472 YouTube videos and 18,237 Pinterest pins with affiliate links from 33 marketing companies.

The researchers found the links by identifying characteristic patterns in the URLs (Uniform Resource Locators) that marketers use to track readers’ clicks.

YouTube
YouTube music will separate the movies and music section on the platform. Pixabay

They then used natural language processing techniques to search for disclosures of affiliate marketing relationships within the ‘videos’ and ‘pins’ descriptions.

Disclosures were present in around just 10 per cent and seven per cent of affiliate marketing content on YouTube and Pinterest, respectively.

These findings were published in the journal, ‘Proceedings of the ACM on Human-Computer Interaction’.

Also Read- Apple Accused of Making False Claims About its iPhone X Series

In view of these findings, the researchers proposed that regulators should take broader legal action against affiliate marketing companies for failures to disclose, and recommend that social media platforms make it easier for content creators to disclose marketing relationships in a standardised way.

The lead author of the study, Arunesh Mathur, a computer science graduate student, and his colleagues are also developing a web browser extension that would automatically flag some types of paid content, Princeton University said in a statement.

In addition, they are working on computational methods to detect other types of hidden advertising on social media, including sponsored content and product giveaways, which are less straightforward to identify than affiliate marketing. (IANS)