Sunday December 16, 2018
Home Politics Video of Kidn...

Video of Kidnapped American-Canadian Couple and their 2 Children Released to meet the Group’s Demands, says an Afghan Taliban

Coleman and Boyle were taken hostage in 2012 as they were backpacking in the Afghan province of Wardak

0
//
Kidnapped
A still image from a video posted by the Taliban on social media, Dec. 19, 2016, shows American Caitlan Coleman speaking next to her Canadian husband, Joshua Boyle, and their two sons. VOA
Republish
Reprint

Islamabad, Pakistan, Dec 21, 2016: An Afghan Taliban official said Wednesday that it released the video of a kidnapped American-Canadian couple and their two children to renew attention on their detention and press their governments to meet the group’s demands.

NewsGram brings to you current foreign news from all over the world.

The video surfaced on Monday, showing American Caitlan Coleman, her Canadian husband Joshua Boyle and their two children, who were born in captivity, pleading with their governments to negotiate with the captors.

Coleman and Boyle were taken hostage in 2012 as they were backpacking in the Afghan province of Wardak. Coleman was pregnant at the time with their first child.

“We have released the video in order to draw attention to the issue and force relevant governments to meet our demands,” the Taliban official told VOA, requesting anonymity.

He refused to elaborate on the demands, saying they have been communicated to “relevant quarters.”

The insurgent groups want, among other things, the release of Taliban prisoners and an immediate halt to executions of those on death row in Afghan jails.

Coleman is shown in the video appealing to both U.S. President Barack Obama and President-elect Donald Trump to rescue her family, warning the kidnappers are determined not to free them unless their demands are met.

“They want money, power, and friends [Taliban prisoners]. You must give them these things before progress can be made. A five-year hostage-taking is too long and indicates failure on every side,” she said while reading a statement that claimed the video was filmed December 3.

NewsGram brings to you top news around the world today.

Following the video’s release, State Department spokesman John Kirby Tuesday reiterated Washington’s call for the family’s unconditional release.

“We obviously remain, as we have been, gravely concerned about the family’s welfare…The threat to harm this innocent family violates all humanitarian and religious standards,” he noted.

Kirby also denounced the appearance of the couple’s children in the hostage video.

“It’s obviously reprehensible to hold them in the first place…But to include children in the video is specifically despicable to do. So again, we want to see them all home, we want to see them all safely returned, and I can assure you that this Administration will continue to work very, very hard to see that outcome,” he added.

The Canadian government has also called for the unconditional release of the family.

The last time the Taliban released a video of the couple was in August this year, though it did not show the children. Both Coleman and Boyle in that video had warned their captors would kill them unless their demands were met.

Check out NewsGram for latest international news updates.

The family is allegedly being held hostage by the Haqqani network. The terrorist group fights alongside the Taliban against U.S.-led international forces and their Afghan partners to dislodge the Kabul government. (VOA)

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2016 NewsGram

Next Story

USA: Everything you want to know about Security Clearance; Find out here!

A security clearance allows a person access to classified national security information or restricted areas.

0
Former CIA Director John O. Brennan speaks at the Council on Foreign Relations in Washington, March 11, 2014. President Donald Trump revoked Brennan's security clearance Wednesday. VOA
Former CIA Director John O. Brennan speaks at the Council on Foreign Relations in Washington, March 11, 2014. President Donald Trump revoked Brennan's security clearance Wednesday. VOA

U.S. President Donald Trump on Wednesday revoked the security clearance of former CIA Director John Brennan. We take a look at what that means.

What is a security clearance?

A security clearance allows a person access to classified national security information or restricted areas after completion of a background check. The clearance by itself does not guarantee unlimited access. The agency seeking the clearance must determine what specific area of information the person needs to access.

What are the different levels of security clearance?

There are three levels: Confidential, secret and top secret. Security clearances don’t expire. But, top secret clearances are reinvestigated every five years, secret clearances every 10 years and confidential clearances every 15 years.

All federal agencies follow a list of 13 potential justifications for revoking or denying a clearance. VOA
All federal agencies follow a list of 13 potential justifications for revoking or denying a clearance. VOA

Who has security clearances?

According to a Government Accountability Office report released last year, about 4.2 million people had a security clearance as of 2015, they included military personnel, civil servants, and government contractors.

Why does one need a security clearance in retirement?

Retired senior intelligence officials and military officers need their security clearances in case they are called to consult on sensitive issues.

Also Read: Governments Across The World Request Apple for 30,000 Device Information

Can the president revoke a security clearance?

Apparently. But there is no precedent for a president revoking someone’s security clearance. A security clearance is usually revoked by the agency that sought it for an employee or contractor. All federal agencies follow a list of 13 potential justifications for revoking or denying a clearance, which can include criminal acts, lack of allegiance to the United States, behavior or situation that could compromise an individual and security violations. (VOA)