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Want to Plan Social Media Savvy Indian Wedding? Take a Look at Some Tips Here

It is common these days to get updates on social media on couples striking a filmy pose in a choreographed pre-wedding video in some exotic location

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Indian Weddings are becoming social media savvy
Indian Wedding. Pixabay
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New Delhi, Sep 10, 2017: Indian weddings getting streamed online has become a trend now. So it is common to get updates on social media on couples striking a filmy pose in a choreographed pre-wedding video in some exotic location. But it’s not easy to plan a social media savvy wedding, say experts.

Sanaa Vohra, Founder and CEO of The Wedding Brigade, which is a destination for wedding needs, and wedding jewellery expert Kartik Nayyar, Founder of OSR Jewellers that are into making semi-precious jewellery, have a few suggestions:

* Have a hashtag: Cliched as it may sound; having a customized hashtag lends a touch of personalization to an otherwise regular wedding. From something that is meaningful to the couple, a play on their initials or a cute personal joke, a hashtag can be anything you want it to be.

Include it in your decor, make it a part of a photo booth, put it in the invites and save the date and get your friends and family to use them for all wedding related pictures and conversations. It’s an easy day to find wedding photos posted by guests in one place on Instagram too.

Also Read: Big Fat Indian Wedding: How to make it more Special with Proper Planning! 

* Customize the ceremony: Instagram and the likes are flooded with pictures and videos from the wedding and sometimes it becomes hard to distinguish one from another. While ceremonies inherently are ritualistic and follow a pattern, add some fun elements to the celebration to make it your own.

A sweet entry by the bride and groom, a thoughtful toast by the best friends or a fun game between the families make for great memories and great videos.

* Decor drama: Nothing spells social media better than beautiful decor but great decoration doesn’t have to mean expensive flowers flown from another country. Give your venues a personal touch with elements that bring out your relationship and your personality.

Using photos of the couple in an innovative way, having sweet centrepieces with personal stories or including elements like a message tree for people to leave marriage advice and notes are some great ways to use decor to make a statement.

* Include everyone: While couples tend to hire the best photographers for getting the perfect shots to be framed in their living room, real time shots for immediate uploading is left on the reliable shoulders of friends and cousins. Make sure all the moments that matter are captured and posted for posterity, including memories your photographer may not capture, such as a sweet moment between your aunt and uncle.

* Have fun: Whether you’re planning a large scale extravaganza or a private intimate affair, whether you’re getting married in a palace or a beach or at a temple, remember to enjoy yourself and not get too caught up in achieving Pinterest perfection! (IANS)

 

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Facebook Expands Its Feature Showing Local Information

Facebook uses software filters to weed out objectionable content, just as it does on people's regular news feed.

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A smartphone user displays a Facebook newsfeed .VOA

Facebook is cautiously expanding a feature that shows people local news and information, including missing-person alerts, road closures, crime reports and school announcements.

Called “Today In,” the service shows people information from their towns and cities from such sources as news outlets, government entities and community groups. Facebook launched the service in January with six cities and expanded that to 25, then more. On Wednesday, “Today In” is expanding to 400 cities in the U.S. — and a few others in Australia.

The move comes as Facebook tries to shake off its reputation as a hotbed for misinformation and elections-meddling and rather a place for communities and people to come together and stay informed.

Here are some things to know about this effort, and why it matters:

Facebook
A Facebook logo is displayed at a start-up companies’ gathering in Paris, France. VOA

The big picture

It’s something users have asked for, the company says. Think of it as an evolution of a “trending” feature the company dropped earlier this year. That feature, which showed news articles that were popular among users, but was rife with such problems as fake news and accusations of bias.

Anthea Watson Strong, product manager for local news and community information, said her team learned from the problems with that feature.

“We feel deeply the mistakes of our foremothers and forefathers,” she said.

This time around, Facebook employees went to some of the cities they were launching in and met with users. They tried to predict problems by doing “pre-mortem” assessments, she said. That is, instead of a “post-mortem” where engineers dissect what went wrong after the fact, they tried to anticipate how people might misuse a feature — for financial gain, for example

 

Facebook, India, Fake News, Hate Speech, Russia, Sheryl Sandberg, digital
This photo shows a Facebook app icon on a smartphone in New York. VOA

.Facebook isn’t saying how long it has been taking this “pre-mortem” approach, though the practice isn’t unique to the company. Nonetheless, it’s a significant step given that many of Facebook’s current problems stem from its failure to foresee how bad actors might co-opt the service.

 

Facebook also hopes the feature’s slow rollout will prevent problems.

How it works

To find out if “Today In” is available in your city or town, tap the “menu” icon with the three horizontal lines. Then scroll down until you see it. If you want, you can choose to see the local updates directly in your news feed.

For now, the company is offering this only in small and mid-sized cities such as Conroe, Texas, Morgantown, West Virginia, and Santa Fe, New Mexico. Large cities such as New York or Los Angeles have added challenges, such as an abundance of news and information, and may need to be broken up into smaller neighborhoods.

 

Facebook, India, Fake News, Hate Speech, Russia, digital
A Facebook panel is seen during the Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity, in Cannes, France. VOA

 

The posts in “Today In” are curated by artificial intelligence; there is no human involvement. The service aggregates posts from the Facebook pages for news organizations, government agencies and community groups like dog shelters. For this reason, a kid couldn’t declare a snow day, because “Today In” relies on the school’s official page. Discussion posts from local Facebook groups may also be included.

For now, the information is tailored only by geography, but this might change. A person with no kids, for example, might not want to see updates from schools.

Also Read: Social Media laws Should Be Tightened: Germany

Safeguards?

Facebook uses software filters to weed out objectionable content, just as it does on people’s regular news feed. But the filters are turned up for “Today In.” If a good friend posts something a bit objectionable, you are still likely to see it because Facebook takes your friendship into account. But “Today In” posts aren’t coming from your friends, so Facebook is more likely to keep it out. (VOA)