Tuesday November 12, 2019

We like taking selfies but not looking at them: Study

A recent study has shown even though clicking selfies is hugely popular on social networking sites, most users would prefer to see less selfies

0
//
social media
The new survey reveals Indians top the list of tourists glued to their phones while on vacation.(Representative image) Wikimedia

London, Feb 28, 2017:  Although taking selfies is hugely popular, most people would prefer to see fewer selfies on social media, a study has found.

Selfies are enormously popular on social media. According to Google statistics estimates, about 93 million selfies were taken per day in 2014, counting only those taken on Android devices.

 The findings showed that compared to the selfies taken by themselves, people attributed greater self-presentational motives and less authenticity to selfies taken by others.

NewsGram brings to you current foreign news from all over the world.

Selfies taken by themselves were also judged as self-ironic and more authentic.

This phenomenon, where many people regularly take selfies but most people don’t appear to like them has been termed the “selfie paradox” by Sarah Diefenbach, Professor at Ludwig-Maximilians-University in Germany.

NewsGram brings to you top news around the world today.

To assess people’s motives and judgements when taking and viewing selfies, the team conducted an online survey of a total of 238 persons living in Austria, Germany, and Switzerland.

The results showed that 77 percent of the participants regularly took selfies.

“One reason for this might be their fit with widespread self-presentation strategies such as self-promotion and self-disclosure”, Diefenbach said in the paper published in the journal Frontiers in Psychology.

Interestingly, despite 77 percent of the participants taking selfies regularly, 62-67 percent agreed on the potential negative consequences of selfies, such as impacts on self-esteem.

Check out NewsGram for latest international news updates.

This negative perception of selfies was also illustrated by 82 percent of participants indicating that they would rather see other types of photos instead of selfies on social media. (IANS)

Next Story

Twitter Shares Child Abuse Content On Social Media: IWF

IWF report says that Twitter leads to child abuse content

0
child abuse
IWF report revealed that most of the child abuse content on social media is shared by Twitter. Pixabay

The UK-based Internet Watch Foundation (IWF) has revealed that nearly half of the child abuse content in the social media space is being shared openly on micro-blogging platform Twitter.

According to a report in The Telegraph that accessed the IWF data, 49 per cent of the images, videos and url links it found on social media, search engines and cloud services in the last three years were on Twitter – “making up 1,396 of the total 2,835 incidents”.

This is a scary incident as the child abuse images and videos slipped through Twitter’s filters and were available for anyone to see.

According to the IWF, it helps minimise the availability of online sexual abuse content, specifically child sexual abuse content hosted anywhere in the world. The majority of its work focuses on the removal of child sexual abuse images and videos.

“We search for child sexual abuse images and videos and offer a place for the public to report them anonymously. We then have them removed,” it said on its website.

Microsoft’s Bing search engine was second in the IWF report, with 604 incidents recorded between 2016 and 2018, followed by Amazon with 375 and Google with 348.

“The IWF found 72 incidents of abuse being openly hosted on Facebook, 18 on its sister site Instagram and 22 on YouTube,” said the report.

child abuse
Earlier reports claimed that Microsoft’s search engine Bing is still serving child porn. Pixabay

A Twitter spokesperson replied to the IWF report: “We have serious concerns about the accuracy of these figures and the metrics used to produce them. We will continue to work with the IWF to address their concerns and improve the accuracy of their data”.

Susie Hargreaves OBE, CEO of the IWF said that “our data is accurate and recorded fairly and consistently regardless of where we find child sexual abuse material”.

Microsoft also questioned the IWF data.

Earlier reports claimed that Microsoft’s search engine Bing is still serving child porn, and certain search terms on the platform brought up child porn images and related keywords.

“Microsoft’s Bing search engine reportedly still served up child porn, nearly a year after the tech giant said it was addressing the issue.

“The news comes as part of a report in The New York Times that looks at what the newspaper says is a failure by tech companies to adequately address child pornography on their platforms,” reports CNET.

Also Read- Ayodhya Verdict Attracts Mixed Reactions From Twitteratis

The tech giant has long been at the forefront of combating abuse imagery, even creating a detection tool called “PhotoDNA” almost a decade ago. But many criminals have turned to its search engine Bing as a reliable tool.

“Part of the issue is privacy, some companies say,” said the report. (IANS)