Tuesday October 23, 2018

We like taking selfies but not looking at them: Study

A recent study has shown even though clicking selfies is hugely popular on social networking sites, most users would prefer to see less selfies

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The new survey reveals Indians top the list of tourists glued to their phones while on vacation.(Representative image) Wikimedia
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London, Feb 28, 2017:  Although taking selfies is hugely popular, most people would prefer to see fewer selfies on social media, a study has found.

Selfies are enormously popular on social media. According to Google statistics estimates, about 93 million selfies were taken per day in 2014, counting only those taken on Android devices.

 The findings showed that compared to the selfies taken by themselves, people attributed greater self-presentational motives and less authenticity to selfies taken by others.

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Selfies taken by themselves were also judged as self-ironic and more authentic.

This phenomenon, where many people regularly take selfies but most people don’t appear to like them has been termed the “selfie paradox” by Sarah Diefenbach, Professor at Ludwig-Maximilians-University in Germany.

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To assess people’s motives and judgements when taking and viewing selfies, the team conducted an online survey of a total of 238 persons living in Austria, Germany, and Switzerland.

The results showed that 77 percent of the participants regularly took selfies.

“One reason for this might be their fit with widespread self-presentation strategies such as self-promotion and self-disclosure”, Diefenbach said in the paper published in the journal Frontiers in Psychology.

Interestingly, despite 77 percent of the participants taking selfies regularly, 62-67 percent agreed on the potential negative consequences of selfies, such as impacts on self-esteem.

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This negative perception of selfies was also illustrated by 82 percent of participants indicating that they would rather see other types of photos instead of selfies on social media. (IANS)

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Twitter Gets Investigated By Ireland Over Data Collection

Both Facebook and Twitter have faced lawsuits for collecting data on links shared in private messages

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Twitter on a smartphone device. VOA

 Twitter is reportedly facing an investigation by privacy regulators in Ireland over data collection in its link-shortening system, the media reported.

Privacy regulators in Ireland have launched an investigation into exactly how much data Twitter collects from t.co, its URL-shortening system, The Verge reported late on Saturday.

The investigation stems from a request made by UK professor Michael Veale under the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), a comprehensive European privacy law under which EU citizens have a right to request any data collected on them from a given company.

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Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg, left, accompanied by Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey are sworn in before the Senate Intelligence Committee hearing on ‘Foreign Influence Operations and Their Use of Social Media Platforms’ on Capitol Hill. VOA

But when Veale made that request to Twitter, the company claimed it had no data from its link-shortening service. The professor was sceptical, and wrote to the relevant privacy regulator to see if Twitter was holding back some of his data.

Now, that investigation seems to be underway. The investigation, first reported by Fortune, is confirmed in a letter obtained by The Verge, sent to Veale by the office of the Irish Data Privacy Commissioner, the report said.

Initially designed as a way to save characters in the limited space of a tweet, link-shortening has also proved to be an effective tool at fighting malware and gathering rudimentary analytics.

Twitter
Twitter Chief Executive Officer Jack Dorsey testifies before a Senate Intelligence Committee hearing on foreign influence operations and their use of social media on Capitol Hill. VOA

Those analytics services can also present a significant privacy risk when used in private messages.

Also Read: Facebook Tackles Fake News, Deletes Almost 800 Accounts

Both Facebook and Twitter have faced lawsuits for collecting data on links shared in private messages, although no wrong-doing was conclusively established in either case. (IANS)