Friday February 22, 2019

What Are The Rights Of Children? Explains, Divya Dutta

Children need to be given their childhood

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What Are The Rights Of Children? Explains, Divya Dutta
What Are The Rights Of Children? Explains, Divya Dutta, flickr

Actress Divya Dutta believes children should be given their childhood away from the stress and pressures of daily life.

The actress, along with filmmaker Amole Gupte, attended a panel discussion organised by Unicef and CRY Foundation, which works for the rights of children.

Divya said: “Children need to be given their childhood. Even if they are on a set (of film shooting and television reality shows), we should make sure no compromise is done with their education, sleep and recreation. So, measures should be taken by all of us.

“Let’s not take away their bachpan (childhood). A beautiful balance is the mantra.”

children
children, pixabay

Also read: Study Suggests Obese Children who Meet Milk Guidelines Have Less Risk of Metabolic Syndrome

She suggested the presence of counsellors on the sets to keep children in check. The panel also raised issues like child artistes’ mental health during stressful times like competing on reality shows.(IANS)

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Study Reveals Midday Meals in School Improves Child’s Scores and Skills

The effect of nutrition appears to be cumulative, seen over time.

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Food provided to children during Midday Meal. Pixabay

Primary school children who ate midday meals over an extended period were shown to have significantly better learning outcomes, according to researchers of Indian-origin.

The researchers, in the study published in the Journal of Development Economics, suggest a powerful connection between nutrition and education.

Professors Rajshri Jayaraman from ESMT Berlin in Germany and Tanika Chakraborty from the Indian Institute of Technology in India studied the effects of India’s midday meal scheme – the world’s largest free school lunch programme – feeding over 120 million children every day.

midday meal
Children showed an improvement of nine per cent for maths test scores. Pixabay

The study showed that children with up to five years of midday meals had reading test scores that are 18 per cent higher than those of students with less than a year of school lunches.

In addition, they showed an improvement of nine per cent for maths test scores.

“The effect of nutrition appears to be cumulative, seen over time. Previous studies have varied between two weeks and two years, and failed to capture the important impact. Our research shows that the real benefit of school lunches was seen in children exposed for two to five years,” said Jayaraman.

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For the study, the researchers used data from nearly 600 rural districts in India, covering over 200,000 households.

In 2017, World Food Programme implemented or supported school feeding programmes for 18.3 million children in 71 countries.(IANS)