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By Harshmeet Singh

To most Indian parents, the only criterion to mark their child’s intelligence is the grades at school. With the child’s grades becoming as much ‘status symbol’ in the society as a luxury car, parents’ concern about their kid’s academic record is driven by concern and worry equally.

An entire generation of kids is cramping up facts and data without understanding the significance behind any of it. Since rote writing gives them the glory of achieving good grades, they can’t be blamed for not trying anything else. What’s more – the ones who try to go beyond rote learning are discouraged with low grades and never-ending follow up questions.

Every child is different

In our society, teaching is a thankless job. Unless you are teaching at a coaching centre for competitive examinations, your teaching profession is considered as your failure to get a good job. The simple fact that teachers are entrusted with the responsibility of shaping the lives of hundreds of students who would go on to shape the country’s future speaks volumes for the role they play in the society.

Yet, most teachers tend to overlook a simple fact – every child is different. The learning capacity and methods of each individual evolve in a different manner. While some people are audio learners, others may be visual learners. There are also a number of people who prefer a kinaesthetic method of learning. It is the teacher’s responsibility to understand the most suitable method for kids’ learning and feed them in that manner. Forcing the rote learning methods on to the kids can kill the potential of their minds.

Indian Education system

Barring some occasional end ranks in the top 100 institutes of the world, Indian educational institutes don’t give much reason to cheer. An acute shortage of teachers at the primary level and a dipping reading level of the kids are the standout features of our education system. Rote learning methods dominate our classrooms, with students learning or rather remembering to pass examinations and score marks, not to gain knowledge. The top rankers are the ones who can learn the most, not the ones who understood the most. An increasing school enrollment ratio has failed to increase the quality of education given in schools.

Bad teachers & absence of teachers

While much attention is given to the high number of vacancies in schools, there are minimal efforts to ensure that the appointed teachers provide the quality of learning that is expected from them. Most of the teachers are poorly trained. Considering that they got their jobs by passing an exam on the basis of rote learning, they can’t be expected to inculcate different values in their students. Absence of teacher training programs has ensured that the teachers reach stagnation within a couple of years of joining.


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