Tuesday November 12, 2019
Home U.S.A. Will Pedestri...

Will Pedestrians in Urban Neighbourhood feel comfortable in a world full of Self-driving Cars?

Autonomous vehicles may facilitate a shift towards pedestrian-oriented urban neighborhoods

1
//
Picture with a sign for pedestrians. Wikimedia Commons

October 31, 2016: What would it be like to be a pedestrian in an urban neighborhood where most of the cars are self-driving? Actually, pretty good, suggests new research.

Self-driving cars are by design risk-averse and they are programmed to obey the rules of the road, including waiting for pedestrians to cross, the researchers said.

“Autonomous vehicles have the potential to transform travel behavior,” said study author Adam Millard-Ball, Assistant Professor at University of California – Santa Cruz, US.

NewsGram brings to you current foreign news from all over the world.

[bctt tweet=”Self-driving cars are by design risk-averse and they are programmed to obey the rules of the road, including waiting for pedestrians to cross.” username=””]

Secure in the knowledge that a car will yield, pedestrians merely need to act unpredictably or step into the street to force the risk-averse car to stop, said the study that looked at the prospect of urban areas where a majority of vehicles are “autonomous” or self-driving.

The research, published online in the Journal of Planning Education and Research, uses game theory to analyze the interactions between pedestrians and self-driving vehicles, with a focus on yielding at crosswalks.

Check out NewsGram for latest international news updates.

Because autonomous vehicles are by design risk-averse, Millard-Ball’s model suggests that pedestrians will be able to act with impunity, and he thinks autonomous vehicles may facilitate a shift towards pedestrian-oriented urban neighborhoods.

However, the study also suggests that the potential benefits of self-driving cars — avoiding tedium of traffic and trauma of collisions — may be outweighed by the drawbacks of an always play-it-safe vehicle that slows traffic for everybody.

NewsGram brings to you top news around the world today.

“From the point of view of a passenger in an automated car, it would be like driving down a street filled with unaccompanied five-year-old children,” Millard-Ball wrote. (IANS)

  • Antara

    Better technologies for a safer and better world!

Next Story

Self-driving Cars Can be a Potential Game-changer for Older Adults: Researchers

It was also found that older drivers tended to exhibit worse takeover quality in terms of operating the steering wheel, the accelerator and the brake, increasing the risk of an accident, Li added

0
Google's self-driving car. Flickr

Self-driving cars can be a potential game-changer for older adults aged above 60 and can help in minimizing the risk of accidents, say, researchers.

“There are several levels of automation, ranging from zero where the driver has complete control, through to level five where the car is in charge… this will allow the driver to be completely disengaged, they can sit back and watch a film, eat, even talk on the phone,” said Shuo Li from the Newcastle University in the UK.

“But, unlike level four or five, there are still some situations where the car would ask the driver to take back control and at that point, they need to be back in driving mode within a few seconds,” Li said.

For the study published in the journal Transportation Research, the researchers examined 76 volunteers, divided into two age groups (20-35 and 60-81), and studied the time it takes for older drivers to take back control of an automated car in different scenarios and also the quality of their driving in these different situations.

They experienced automated driving for a short period and were then asked to take back control of a highly automated car and avoid a stationary vehicle.

Uber, bengaluru
Toyota Motor Corp. recently invested $500 million in working with Uber on self-driving technology for the ride-hailing service.

It was found that in clear conditions, the quality of driving was good but the reaction time of older volunteers was significantly slower than the younger drivers. It took older drivers about 8.3 seconds to negotiate obstacles compared to around 7 seconds for the younger age group.

“At 60mph, that means older drivers would have needed an extra 35m warning distance – that’s equivalent to the length of 10 cars,” said Li.

Also Read: Ease in Local Sourcing Norms Big Boost for Firms Like Apple

It was also found that older drivers tended to exhibit worse takeover quality in terms of operating the steering wheel, the accelerator and the brake, increasing the risk of an accident, Li added.

The researchers concluded that fully automated cars which are unlikely to require a license and could negotiate bad weather and unfamiliar cities under all situations without input from the driver can be a potential game-changer for older adults and help in avoiding accidents. (IANS)