Saturday September 22, 2018

Will plain packaging help in reducing tobacco smoking?

Australia in 2012 became the first country to introduce plain packaging of tobacco products and there were 108,000 fewer smokers over that period

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France, tobacco store, cigarettes. Image source: HuffingtonPost
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  • Almost 6 million people a year die prematurely from tobacco-related illnesses
  • In 2012, Australia became the first country to introduce plain packaging of tobacco products
  • Ireland, Norway, Singapore, Belgium and New Zealand are also planning to implement this measure

The type of plain packaging of tobacco products proposed by the WHO stands in sharp contrast to wrappers featuring rugged cowboys smoking in the great outdoors.

Sample packages are black, with large warnings that smoking kills and graphic images of people dying from cancer.  Douglas Bettcher, the WHO’s director for the prevention of non-communicable diseases, says the point of plain packaging is to reduce demand for tobacco by reducing the attractiveness of these products.

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“It very clearly labels tobacco for what it is, the only legally available product worldwide that when used as intended kills up to half of its users,” said Bettcher.

Many people may be vaping nicotine through e-cigarettes, smoking. Image source: post-gazette.com
Many people may be vaping nicotine through e-cigarettes, smoking. Image source: post-gazette.com

The WHO reports almost 6 million people a year die prematurely from tobacco-related illnesses. The number is projected to rise to more than 8 million by 2030, with more than 80 percent of these preventable deaths occurring in developing countries.

Packaging

Australia in 2012 became the first country to introduce plain packaging of tobacco products, along with new and enlarged health warnings. France and Britain have since followed suit.  The WHO says other countries including Ireland, Norway, Singapore, Belgium and New Zealand are also planning to implement this measure.

Benn McGrady, an Australian lawyer and technical officer at the WHO, says Australia conducted a 34-month review between December 2012 and September 2015 to gauge the impact of plain packaging.

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“Over that period there was approximately a 2 percentage point reduction in the prevalence of smoking in Australia. Zero-point-55 percentage points is attributable to the packaging changes,” he said.

McGrady added there were an estimated 108,000 fewer smokers over that period as a consequence of the changes to packaging and labeling. (VOA)

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  • Vrushali Mahajan

    This should be done in India too. India is a country with great amount of smokers right from an early age. Initiatives should be taken to do so.

  • Shubhi Mangla

    I think i a country like India this won’t be that beneficial. Almost everyone knows that smoking kills but still they don’t give it up. Large warnings that recently came to be printed failed to make goo efforts too.

  • devika todi

    this is a step taken in the right direction. smoking has been glorified for long. in India, consumption of tobacco is also supported heavily. the government should definitely take measures to ensure that the public is well educated on these matters. the consumption of such products degrades the quality of health and poses as a risk to the consumer’s life.
    while we are on it, maybe we can stop the influential personalities from advertising for products that are dangerous to health, like tobacco.

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  • Vrushali Mahajan

    This should be done in India too. India is a country with great amount of smokers right from an early age. Initiatives should be taken to do so.

  • Shubhi Mangla

    I think i a country like India this won’t be that beneficial. Almost everyone knows that smoking kills but still they don’t give it up. Large warnings that recently came to be printed failed to make goo efforts too.

  • devika todi

    this is a step taken in the right direction. smoking has been glorified for long. in India, consumption of tobacco is also supported heavily. the government should definitely take measures to ensure that the public is well educated on these matters. the consumption of such products degrades the quality of health and poses as a risk to the consumer’s life.
    while we are on it, maybe we can stop the influential personalities from advertising for products that are dangerous to health, like tobacco.

Next Story

Queensland in Australia to Combat Diseases And Deaths Caused by Climate-change

Forecasters say southeastern Australia can expect more unusually warm and dry conditions in the coming months

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Queensland
FILE - A dead tree stands near a water tank in a drought-stricken paddock located on the outskirts of the southwestern Queensland town of Cunnamulla in outback Australia, Aug. 10, 2017. (VOA)

The Queensland state government in Australia is to fund a new program to help combat killer heatwaves and outbreaks of disease caused by climate change. Authorities are even discussing imposing tobacco-style taxes against carbon polluters. The initiative comes as the United Nation chief warned that if the world does not take serious action by 2020, it risks the fallout from “runaway climate change.”

The plan to tackle climate-related disease and deaths from heatwaves is part of the Queensland government’s efforts to cut the state’s carbon emissions to zero by 2050.

The strategy urges bureaucrats and executives to consider health impacts when assessing mining and energy projects. It also encourages the government not to subsidize “activities harmful to health and climate stability”.

It identifies heat stress among children and the elderly as the main concern for the future. Heatwaves are Australia’s biggest natural hazard, killing more people than droughts, floods and bush fires put together.

Other climate-driven health fears are “food and water insecurity, malnutrition, worsening [and] cardiovascular and respiratory” illnesses.

Fiona Armstrong, the head of the Climate and Health Alliance, which helped draw up the plan, said wild conditions can kill.

“You only need to look at the example of thunderstorm asthma in Melbourne a couple of years ago to see how these kinds of events, even though they might be predicted, can really take the sector and the community by surprise,” Armstrong said.

Australia
Tire tracks left by a truck can be seen in a drought-stricken paddock on Kahmoo Station property, located on the outskirts of the southwestern Queensland town of Cunnamulla in outback Australia, Aug. 10, 2017. (VOA)

Thunderstorm asthma can be triggered when storms play havoc with pollen, causing potentially fatal respiratory problems.

The Queensland plan also identifies the increased risk of mental illness among those affected by a worsening drought that has gripped much of eastern Australia, including much of Queensland and the entire state of New South Wales.

Queensland farmer Sid Plant said federal authorities are not doing enough.

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“Politicians do not seem to want to recognize that climate change is affecting Australia’s farmers. We are feeling the pain as early as anybody in the world. We are not living in the same climate that we were 20 years ago or 50 years ago,” said Plant.

Forecasters say southeastern Australia can expect more unusually warm and dry conditions in the coming months.

Some Australians doubt man’s influence on the climate, insisting that a shifting climate is part of a natural cycle. However, that remains a minority view. (VOA)