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Women with any past episode of Kidney Damage likely to face Complications like Premature Delivery: Study

They were at a 2.4 times greater risk of any adverse foetal outcome and a 5.9 times greater risk of developing pre-eclampsia

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A pregnant woman, Pixabay

New York, December 23, 2016: Women with any past episode of kidney damage, despite recuperation before pregnancy, were likely to face complications like premature delivery and pre-eclampsia, a study has found.

Pre-eclampsia is a complication characterised by high blood pressure.

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“Our findings that women with prior acute kidney injury were at hightened risk including preeclampsia are important because all of them had recovered before conceiving,” said Jessica Sheehan Tangren from Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH).

“They would not necessarily have been identified as high risk cases,” Tangren added, given the normal results on the standard test for kidney function.

The glomerular filtration rate for such women were normal and yet they developed pre-eclampsia and even showed higher chances of delivering with C-sections.

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In addition, to greater likelihood of being born early, their babies were more likely to be small for their gestational age and even required paediatric intensive care treatment.

They were at a 2.4 times greater risk of any adverse foetal outcome and a 5.9 times greater risk of developing pre-eclampsia.

While the reason behind this was unclear, it’s possible, the researchers said that changes known to take place in small blood vessels within the kidneys during recovery post-injury compromised the organ’s ability to cope with demands during pregnancy.

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“We know that kidneys undergo major changes during pregnancy, and that sort of ‘renal stress test’ may reveal previously undetected kidney disease in women with a history of acute kidney injury,” Tangren noted.

The findings were published online in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. (IANS)

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Blood Test Can Help Diagnose Pre-eclampsia, Says Study

There was no change in the likelihood of complications for the baby, the age at which babies were delivered prematurely or whether they were admitted to a neonatal unit

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Image source- sites.bu.edu

A simple blood test can help diagnose a common but potentially fatal pregnancy complication — pre-eclampsia, finds a study published in The Lancet journal.

During the study, by measuring the concentration of placental growth factor (PlGF) in a woman’s blood, doctors were able to diagnose pre-eclampsia two days sooner on average.

“We knew monitoring PlGF was an accurate way to help detect the condition but were unsure whether making this tool available to clinicians would lead to better care for women. Now we know that it does,” said lead author Lucy Chappell from King’s College London.

Pre-eclampsia, a condition in pregnancy characterised by high blood pressure, sometimes with fluid retention and proteinuria, can cause damage to vital organs, fits and can be fatal for the woman and baby, if left untreated. Globally, 100 women die due to pre-eclampsia every day.

A health service worker takes a blood sample for a malaria test in Dajabon, Dominican Republic, on the border with Haiti, Oct. 6, 2009. A test that doesn't require a needle or blood has won the Africa Prize for Engineering Innovation
A health service worker takes a blood sample for a malaria test in Dajabon, Dominican Republic, on the border with Haiti, Oct. 6, 2009. VOA

“For the last hundred years, we have diagnosed pre-eclampsia by measuring blood pressure and checking for protein in a woman’s urine. These are relatively imprecise and often quite subjective,” Chappell noted.

For the study, the research team studied 1,035 women with suspected pre-eclampsia from 11 maternity units across the UK. They were randomly assigned to two groups — one had their PlGF test results made available to their clinical team, the other did not.

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The PlGF testing was shown to reduce the average time to diagnose pre-eclampsia from four to two days and serious complications before birth (such as eclampsia, stroke, and maternal death) to four per cent from five per cent.

There was no change in the likelihood of complications for the baby, the age at which babies were delivered prematurely or whether they were admitted to a neonatal unit, the researchers said. (IANS)