Monday October 22, 2018

World Antibiotic Awareness Week 2016 Focuses on Using Antibiotics with Care

Antibiotics are not smart enough to selectively target the bad bacteria and destroy it and keep the other good cells around them safe

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November 17, 2016: The week of November14-20 marks the second World Antibiotic Awareness Week.

Antibiotics are not smart enough to selectively target the bad bacteria and destroy it and keep the other good cells around them safe. Rather, they wipe out a whole population of bacteria, good and bad, some of them may be are beneficial to the body.
During this process, some bacteria become resistant to the antibiotics to allow them to survive the adverse condition thereby reducing the desire effect of antibiotics.

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During this process, some bacteria become resistant to the antibiotics to allow them to survive the adverse condition thereby reducing the desire effect of antibiotics.

Different antibiotics are used for treating many serious infections in protecting cancer patients, surgical patients, people with bad immune systems, and to promoting growth and preventing disease in livestock. Moreover, once-treatable infections are becoming tough to cure due to antibiotic resistance.

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This year, the WHO-lead initiative of World Antibiotic Awareness Week’s main purpose is to increase the awareness of global antibiotic resistance. It is also to encourage the best practices among public in general, health workers and also the policy makers to avoid the further emergence and spread of the antibiotic resistance.

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Antibiotic resistance is everyone’s problem, and therefore, it is everyone’s responsibility to avoid it. People in a responsible manner should avoid antibiotics to treat common viral infections like common cold or flu or diarrhoea.

– by Pinaz Kazi of NewsGram. Twitter: @PinazKazi

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Ebola Not A Global Health Emergency: WHO

WHO advised DRC's nine neighboring countries that they were at high risk of having the disease spread into their territories

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An emergency committee convened by the World Health Organization has decided that the Ebola outbreak in eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo does not constitute a public health emergency of international concern.

The WHO said Wednesday that 216 cases of Ebola and 139 deaths had been reported, and its International Health Regulations Emergency Committee said the outbreak was a matter of serious concern, especially since it is occurring in an area of conflict in eastern DRC. It said this posed problems for health workers who need to move around freely and track people who are infected with the virus and need treatment.

But the committee said that one reason it did not regard the outbreak as a global threat was that the virus had not spread into neighboring countries.

Congo,ebola
A Congolese health worker administers Ebola vaccine to a boy who had contact with an Ebola sufferer in the village of Mangina in North Kivu province of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. VOA

Committee Chairman Robert Steffan said the international response to the outbreak had been very good. He said WHO and other agencies had achieved quite a lot since the outbreak was declared Aug. 1. In fact, he said the disease was being brought under control in North Kivu province.

The disease is flaring up in another province, and the response is being concentrated in this area, he said, “so we do have some optimism that this outbreak, just like the one in May, will be brought under control within reasonable time.”

Steffan said the committee agreed that declaring an international emergency at this time would hinder efforts to contain the Ebola virus. He said a declaration would have implications for travel and trade, making it difficult for needed experts and supplies to access the affected areas.

Ebola, WHO
A health care worker from the World Health Organization, left, gives an Ebola vaccination to a front line aid worker who will then vaccinate people who might potentially have the virus, in Mbandaka, Congo. VOA

However, as a precaution, WHO recommended exit screenings, including at airports, ports and land crossings. But it noted that entry screenings, particularly in distant airports, would have no public health benefit and would be costly.

Also Read: North Kivu And Ituri, Congo To Welcome More Than 80,000 Children In This New School Year

WHO advised DRC’s nine neighboring countries that they were at high risk of having the disease spread into their territories, and it said it was supporting them with equipment and personnel. It said these preparedness activities were expensive and would require substantial financial support from the international community. (VOA)