Sunday November 17, 2019

Positive thinking can be the secret to Healthy Ageing

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Positive psychology, Wikimedia commons
  • Think positive- the secret of living
  • One should have a proper motto towards his/her life .
  • Negative minded people die 6-7 years early than the happy ones.

Ageism is the tendency to evaluate older persons as debilitated, unworthy of attention, or unsuitable for employment. Ageing is all about life and death . It’s about how you perceive your thoughts. They say life is a long journey. Well, let’s make it a bit longer.

Becca Levy (Research professor of epidemiology and phycology at Yale School of Public and Health) said: “it depends on how much a given individual takes those negative ideas to heart.” She observed a disjoint set of people who were in their late middle age. There was a difference of opinion among people. Some considered aging as a natural phenomenon and though it as becoming more experienced and wise. The others considered aging as becoming older people who are weak and dependent. There was a significant difference in lifespan between the former and the latter ones. While the latter died 7 years before former lived 7 and half years more.

This doesn’t mean that thinking positively and being a couch potato will keep you alive for more years. Our mind and body are way more interconnected than our imaginations. Studies have shown that people with positive mindset are more likely to recover from major health setbacks. While people having no major impairment but did had a negative mindset are likely to later develop the brain changes associated with Alzheimer’s diseases. More their thoughts degrade lesser their lifespan becomes.

Old people with no positive attitude, Wikimedia commons
Old people with no positive attitude, Wikimedia commons

One can idolize 95-year-old Jim Shute of Medford, Ore. His daily routine comprises of waking up at 6.30 am followed by reading a local newspaper. After having breakfast he makes a check on his garden’s irrigation system. In his spare time, he also goes fishing, refinishes furniture.

Patricia Boyle, a neuropsychologist and behavioural scientist in Chicago tells that It’s not necessary to do all those things but to live a contempt life and having a purpose for life is good enough to achieve health dividends. It gives a sense of accomplishment.

These positive minded people are substantially less prone to strokes and disability. One shouldn’t assume that he/she is useless. Have a motive, change your attitude towards life and good things will along our way.

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-by Pritam. Pritam is an engineering student and an intern at Newsgram . Twitter handle-  Pritam_gogreen

  • devika todi

    i have heard that a positive mind leads to a positive life. it should say that a positive mind leads to a longer, healthier and positive life!

Next Story

Microorganisms Living In The Gut May Alter The Ageing Process

A new study says that the microorganisms found living in the gut may alter ageing process

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Microorganisms
Researchers have found that microorganisms living in the gut may alter the ageing process. Pixabay

Researchers have found that microorganisms living in the gut may alter the ageing process, which could lead to the development of food-based treatment to slow it down.

All living organisms, including human beings, coexist with a myriad of microbial species living in and on them, and research conducted over the last 20 years has established their important role in nutrition, physiology, metabolism and behaviour.

“We’ve found that microbes collected from an old mouse have the capacity to support neural growth in a younger mouse,” said study researcher Sven Pettersson from Nanyang Technological University in Singapore.

“This is a surprising and very interesting observation, especially since we can mimic the neuro-stimulatory effect by using butyrate alone,” Pettersson added.

Using mice, the research team transplanted gut microbes from old mice (24 months old) into young, germ-free mice (six weeks old).

After eight weeks, the young mice had increased intestinal growth and production of neurons in the brain, known as neurogenesis.

The team showed that the increased neurogenesis was due to an enrichment of gut microbes that produce a specific short chain fatty acid, called butyrate.

Butyrate is produced through microbial fermentation of dietary fibres in the lower intestinal tract and stimulates production of a pro-longevity hormone called FGF21, which plays an important role in regulating the body’s energy and metabolism.

Microorganisms, mice
Using mice, the research team transplanted gut microorganisms from old mice into young, germ-free mice. Pixabay

As we age, butyrate production is reduced.

The researchers then showed that giving butyrate on its own to the young germ-free mice had the same adult neurogenesis effects.

“These results will lead us to explore whether butyrate might support repair and rebuilding in situations like stroke, spinal damage and to attenuate accelerated ageing and cognitive decline,” Pettersson said.

The team also explored the effects of gut microbe transplants from old to young mice on the functions of the digestive system.

With age, the viability of small intestinal cells is reduced, and this is associated with reduced mucus production that make intestinal cells more vulnerable to damage and cell death.

However, the addition of butyrate helps to better regulate the intestinal barrier function and reduce the risk of inflammation.

Also Read- Syska Launches An Anti-Bacterial LED Bulb

The team found that mice receiving microbes from the old donor gained increases in length and width of the intestinal villi – the wall of the small intestine. In addition, both the small intestine and colon were longer in the old mice than the young germ-free mice.

The discovery shows that gut microbes can compensate and support an ageing body through positive stimulation. (IANS)