Monday April 22, 2019

20 years after rescuing her, retired detective becomes special guest at a young woman’s graduation in Connecticut

The fire broke out in an apartment in June 1998, which belonged to Josibelk Aponti's uncle Jofrey. She lost her cousin in the accident while she herself suffered third degree-burns.

0
//
Then and now: Getz and Aponti Hartford Courant Image source: Independent.co.uk

A Connecticut detective was invited as a special guest in the graduation ceremony of a woman. If this seems strange, it can be traced back to 20 years before, when this detective rescued a five-year old girl from a terrible apartment fire.

Two years back in 2014, Josi Aponti, who is now 23 and a graduate, used the internet and social media to trace her guardian angel, Retired Detective Peter Getz. Josi used Facebook to find her savior as she felt that Peter is the reason that she is alive today and that he must be present at her commencement ceremony.

The fire broke out in an apartment in June 1998, which belonged to her uncle Jofrey. Josibelk Aponti (her proper name), lost her cousin in the accident while she herself suffered third degree-burns.

Flashback of the fire. Image source: Independent.co.uk
Flashback of the fire. Image Source: Independent.co.uk

Instead for waiting for assistance from hospital or an ambulance, Mr Getz took the unconscious girl into a car and performed CPR on her while his partner, Sgt. Donnie Camp, drove at high speed to reach the nearest hospital.

According to a NBC News report, after the Eastern Connecticut State University commencement at the giant XL Center, a sports arena in Hartford, Ms Aponte said, “I’m told that if he would have just waited a few more seconds for the ambulance to come in, I could have died.”

“There are only a few moments that are so important in life. I wanted to share my graduation with everyone who’s important to me, who have been there for me, and who helped me through tough times,“ Josi said.

Mr Getz and Sgt. Camp got featured in a Throwback Thursday post, when people posted old photographs on social media last year in 2015, reminding both of them of the tragic and chaotic day.

“I am honored and humbled to be depicted here on TBT. I take my hat off to the brave and heroic members of the Hartford Fire Department that entered the active fire, located Josie and brought her out. Thank You,” Mr Getz replied to that post last year.

This incident made him a hero to one grateful family but even today he remains modest of that day.

Related Articles

 

Next Story

Facebook Urges US Police to Stop Using Fake Accounts

When law enforcement has a written policy of engaging in fake/impersonator law enforcement accounts in violation of Facebook's policies, the social network should add a notification to the agency's page to inform users of the law enforcement policy

0
Facebook, photos
This photograph taken on May 16, 2018, shows a figurine standing in front of the logo of social network Facebook on a cracked screen of a smartphone in Paris. VOA

Facebook should take new steps, including issuance of alerts to users, to address the proliferation of fake accounts operated by law enforcement agencies in the US, according to the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), a digital civil liberties not-for-profit organisation.

A report in the Guardian earlier revealed that the US Immigration and Customs Enforcement (Ice) violated Facebook’s guidelines by creating fake profiles on its platform tied to the University of Farmington — a sham institution that left many students, most of them Indians, in detention.

Facebook’s policy prohibits all users, including government agencies, from making fake accounts. But despite this, law enforcement agencies created fake accounts to spy on users, EFF said.

Police departments in Ohio, New York, Georgia and Nebraska said they had policies allowing investigators to use aliases and undercover profiles on social media, the Guardian reported on Monday.

“Facebook’s practice of taking down these accounts when they learn about them from the press (or from EFF) is insufficient to deter what we believe is a much larger iceberg beneath the surface,” EFF’s Senior Investigative Researcher Dave Maass wrote in a blogpost.

Facebook
Facebook’s founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg speaks at the Viva Tech start-up and technology summit in Paris, France, May 24, 2018. VOA

“We often only discover the existence of law enforcement fake profiles months, if not years, after an investigation has concluded,” Maass said.

In addition to suspending fake accounts, Facebook should publish data on the number of fake/impersonator law enforcement accounts identified, what agencies they belonged to, and what action was taken, EFF said.

According to EFF, when a fake/impersonator account is identified, Facebook should alert the users and groups that interacted with the account whether directly or indirectly.

Also Read- Jio Tops 4G Download Speed Chart

Facebook should further amend its “Amended Terms for Federal, State and Local Governments in the United States” to make it explicitly clear that, by agreeing to the terms, the agency was agreeing not to operate fake/impersonator profiles on the platform, Maass said.

When law enforcement has a written policy of engaging in fake/impersonator law enforcement accounts in violation of Facebook’s policies, the social network should add a notification to the agency’s page to inform users of the law enforcement policy, Maass said. (IANS)