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50 percent of millennials in US prefer checking Snapchat first over other social media platforms : Survey

The survey involving nearly 10,000 college students found that 58 per cent of them check Snapchat over Facebook, Instagram, and LinkedIn combined

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New York, Mar 17, 2017: More than 50 per cent of millennials in the US prefer checking Snapchat first over other social media platforms such as Facebook, Instagram, and LinkedIn, the results of a new survey suggest.

The survey involving nearly 10,000 college students found that 58 per cent of them check Snapchat over Facebook, Instagram, and LinkedIn combined.

Instagram accounted for 27 per cent, Facebook for 13 per cent, and LinkedIn for two per cent, or a total of 42 per cent, showed the new data gathered by LendEDU, an online marketplace for student loans and student loan refinancing.

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The findings suggest that Snap Inc., parent company of messaging app Snapchat, may not only survive the volatile Wall Street environment, but prosper.

Snap Inc has been the word on Wall Street since it went public on March 2.

Snap rode its immense popularity to produce eye-popping numbers during its initial offering, with a first day closing price at $24.53.

In the days following the IPO, shares of Snap traded lower as exuberance and volume settled.

But the messaging app’s popularity among millenials (born between 1980 and and early 2000s)can help the company prosper in the stock market, according to the new results.

NewsGram brings to you top news around the world today.

“Overall, Snap’s access and importance to millennials will be the driving force behind their success in the stock market,” LendEDU said in a report on Thursday.

For the study, LendEDU has gathered this data under license from polling company WhatsGoodly.

According to Snap, the majority of Snapchat users are aged 18-to-34 years old. On an average, these users visit the app 18 times a day for a combined 25 to 30 minutes.

Additionally, users younger than 25 visit the application more than 20 times a day for more than 30 minutes. (IANS)

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Facebook Forges Ahead With Kids App Despite Expert Criticism

Critics say it serves to lure kids into harmful social media use and to hook young people on Facebook as it tries to compete with Snapchat or its own Instagram app

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Facebook is forging ahead with its messaging app for kids, despite child experts who have pressed the company to shut it down. VOA

Facebook is forging ahead with its messaging app for kids, despite child experts who have pressed the company to shut it down and others who question Facebook’s financial support of some advisers who approved of the app.

Messenger Kids lets kids under 13 chat with friends and family. It displays no ads and lets parents approve who their children message. But critics say it serves to lure kids into harmful social media use and to hook young people on Facebook as it tries to compete with Snapchat or its own Instagram app. They say kids shouldn’t be on such apps at all — although they often are.

“It is disturbing that Facebook, in the face of widespread concern, is aggressively marketing Messenger Kids to even more children,” the Campaign For a Commercial-Free Childhood said in a statement this week.

ALSO READ: Why Facebook blocking posts in India is necessary

Facebook now gives options to add friends from the live chat. Pixabay
Facebook now gives options to add friends from the live chat. Pixabay

Lukeward reception

Messenger Kids launched on iOS to a lukewarm reception in December. It arrived on Amazon devices in January and on Android Wednesday. Throughout, Facebook has touted a team of advisers, academics, and families who helped shape the app in the year before it launched.

But a Wired report this week pointed out that more than half of this safety advisory board had financial ties to the company. Facebook confirmed this and said it hasn’t hidden donations to these individuals and groups — although it hasn’t publicized them, either.

Facebook’s donations to groups like the National PTA (the official name of the Parent Teacher Association) typically covered logistics costs or sponsored activities like anti-bullying programs or events such as parent roundtables. One advisory group, the Family Online Safety Institute, has an executive on its board, along with execs from Disney, Comcast, and Google.

“We sometimes provide funding to cover programmatic or logistics expenses, to make sure our work together can have the most impact,” Facebook said in a statement, adding that many of the organizations and people who advised on Messenger Kids do not receive financial support of any kind.

Common Sense a late addition

But for a company under pressure from many sides — Congress, regulators, advocates for online privacy and mental health — even the appearance of impropriety can hurt. Facebook didn’t invite prominent critics, such as the nonprofit Common Sense Media, to advise it on Messenger Kids until the process was nearly over. Facebook would not comment publicly on why it didn’t include Common Sense earlier in the process.

“Because they know we opposed their position,” said James Steyer, the CEO of Common Sense. The group’s stance is that Facebook should never have released a product aimed at kids. “They know very well our position with Messenger Kids.”

A few weeks after Messenger Kids launched, nearly 100 outside experts banded together to urge Facebook to shut down the app, which it has not done. The company says it is “committed to building better products for families, including Messenger Kids. That means listening to parents and experts, including our critics.”

ALSO READ: Facebook Realizes Internet Can Harm Democracy

Facebook has over 217 million monthly active users in India and 212 million of them are active on smartphones. Pixabay
Facebook has over 217 million monthly active users in India and 212 million of them are active on smartphones. Pixabay

Wired article unfair?

One of Facebook’s experts contested the notion that company advisers were in Facebook’s pocket. Lewis Bernstein, now a paid Facebook consultant who worked for Sesame Workshop (the nonprofit behind “Sesame Street”) in various capacities over three decades, said the Wired article “unfairly” accused him and his colleagues for accepting travel expenses to Facebook seminars.

But the Wired story did not count Lewis as one of the seven out of 13 advisers who took funding for Messenger Kids, and the magazine did not include travel funding when it counted financial ties. Bernstein was not a Facebook consultant at the time he was advising it on Messenger Kids.

Bernstein, who doesn’t see technology as “inherently dangerous,” suggested that Facebook critics like Common Sense are also tainted by accepting $50 million in donated airtime for a campaign warning about the dangers of technology addiction. Among those air-time donors is Comcast and AT&T’s DirecTV.

But Common Sense spokeswoman Corbie Kiernan called that figure a “misrepresentation” that got picked up by news outlets. She said Common Sense has public service announcement commitments “from partners such as Comcast and DirectTV” that has been valued at $50 million. The group has used that time in other campaigns in addition to its current “Truth About Tech” effort, which it’s launching with a group of ex-Google and Facebook employees and their newly formed Center for Humane Technology. (VOA)