Tuesday February 19, 2019
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A Smartphone Application That Helps You Quit Smoking

The study published in the journal Aging, demonstrated that the smoking-induced aging acceleration reverts back to normal after smoking cessation

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New smartphone app to help you quit smoking. Pixabay

Researchers have developed a new smartphone-based app that can track if you smoke a lot and can help you quit.

The app Gero Healthspan developed by scientists from Gero and Roswell Park Cancer Institute in New York offers a way to track the rejuvenating effect of smoking cessation in real time through the analysis of wearable data.

The bioage acceleration caused by smoking can be detected through the analysis of physical activity signals collected from wearable devices.

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FILE – New findings show that smoking causes devastating genetic damage, or mutations, in the cells of various organs in the body. VOA

From this, a new Artificial Intelligence (AI) algorithm trained to find certain patterns in intraday changes of activity level to estimate the biological age of a person has been developed.

The study published in the journal Aging, demonstrated that the smoking-induced aging acceleration reverts back to normal after smoking cessation and the process can be tracked by the wearable device.

Also Read: Reducing Alcohol Intake Can Help In Quitting Smoking

“You can use the app to explore how lifestyle changes such as diets, activities and supplements affect your predicted healthy life expectancy. We hope that our app will help people to stop deliberately shortening their lives and help to develop healthy lifestyles,” said Peter Fedichev, Founder and Chief Science Officer of Gero. (IANS)

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Excess Smoking Can Not Just Cause Cancer But Also Blindness

Heavy smokers also have reduced ability to discriminate contrasts and colours compared with non-smokers.

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"Cigarette smoke consists of numerous compounds that are harmful, and it has been linked to a reduction in the thickness of layers in the brain, and to brain lesions, involving areas such as the frontal lobe, which plays a role in voluntary movement and control of thinking, and a decrease in activity in the area of the brain that processes vision," he said. Pixabay

While excessive smoking has been linked to various health issues, including heart disease and cancer, a new study has warned that smoking over 20 cigarettes a day can cause blindness.

The study from the Rutgers University noted that chronic tobacco smoking can have harmful effects on “spatial and colour vision”.

The findings, published in the journal Psychiatry Research, noted significant changes in the smokers’ red-green and blue-yellow colour vision. This suggests that consuming substances with neurotoxic chemicals, such as those in cigarettes, may cause overall colour vision loss.

Heavy smokers also have reduced ability to discriminate contrasts and colours compared with non-smokers.

“Our results indicate excessive use of cigarettes, or chronic exposure to their compounds, affects visual discrimination, supporting the existence of overall deficits in visual processing with tobacco addiction,” said Steven Silverstein from the Rutgers’s Behavioral Health Care.

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Heavy smokers also have reduced ability to discriminate contrasts and colours compared with non-smokers. Pixabay

“Cigarette smoke consists of numerous compounds that are harmful, and it has been linked to a reduction in the thickness of layers in the brain, and to brain lesions, involving areas such as the frontal lobe, which plays a role in voluntary movement and control of thinking, and a decrease in activity in the area of the brain that processes vision,” he said.

For the study, the team looked at 71 healthy people who smoked less than 15 cigarettes in their entire lives and 63 people, who smoked over 20 cigarettes a day. The participants were in the 25-45 year age group.

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The study’s findings showed noticeable changes in the red-green and blue-yellow colour vision of the heavy smokers.

Previous studies had also pointed to long-term smoking as doubling the risk for age-related macular degeneration and as a factor causing lens yellowing and inflammation. (IANS)