Tuesday April 23, 2019
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A Smartphone Application That Helps You Quit Smoking

The study published in the journal Aging, demonstrated that the smoking-induced aging acceleration reverts back to normal after smoking cessation

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New smartphone app to help you quit smoking. Pixabay

Researchers have developed a new smartphone-based app that can track if you smoke a lot and can help you quit.

The app Gero Healthspan developed by scientists from Gero and Roswell Park Cancer Institute in New York offers a way to track the rejuvenating effect of smoking cessation in real time through the analysis of wearable data.

The bioage acceleration caused by smoking can be detected through the analysis of physical activity signals collected from wearable devices.

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FILE – New findings show that smoking causes devastating genetic damage, or mutations, in the cells of various organs in the body. VOA

From this, a new Artificial Intelligence (AI) algorithm trained to find certain patterns in intraday changes of activity level to estimate the biological age of a person has been developed.

The study published in the journal Aging, demonstrated that the smoking-induced aging acceleration reverts back to normal after smoking cessation and the process can be tracked by the wearable device.

Also Read: Reducing Alcohol Intake Can Help In Quitting Smoking

“You can use the app to explore how lifestyle changes such as diets, activities and supplements affect your predicted healthy life expectancy. We hope that our app will help people to stop deliberately shortening their lives and help to develop healthy lifestyles,” said Peter Fedichev, Founder and Chief Science Officer of Gero. (IANS)

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Avoid Smoking During Pregnancy To Prevent Premature Births

The negative health impacts of cigarette smoking during pregnancy, including low birth weight, delayed intrauterine development, pre-term birth, infant mortality, and long-term developmental delays, are well known. 

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The researcher plans to look at quit rates and smoking intensity and their impact on the risk of infant mortality. Pixabay

Expecting mothers, take note. As smoking during pregnancy is linked with negative health outcomes, a team of researchers has found that smoking cessation during pregnancy may reduce the risk of pre-term birth.

The findings, published in the JAMA Network Open journal, showed that the probability of pre-term birth decreased with earlier smoking cessation in pregnancy — up to a 20 per cent relative decrease if cessation occurred at the beginning of pregnancy.

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If we determine quitting, and quitting early, reduces the risk of infant mortality, then that may speak to mothers even more saliently about the importance of smoking cessation. Pixabay

“Of concern, though, given the substantial benefits of smoking cessation during pregnancy is that the proportion of pre-pregnancy smokers who quit smoking during pregnancy has remained essentially stagnant since 2011,” said lead author Samir Soneji from The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice in the US.

For the study, the researchers conducted a cross-sectional study of more than 25 million pregnant women who gave birth to live neonates during a six-year period — measuring their smoking frequency three months prior to pregnancy and for each trimester during pregnancy.

The negative health impacts of cigarette smoking during pregnancy, including low birth weight, delayed intrauterine development, pre-term birth, infant mortality, and long-term developmental delays, are well known.

But the good news is that the proportion of women who start their pregnancy as smokers has been declining in recent years, the researchers said.

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The findings, published in the JAMA Network Open journal, showed that the probability of pre-term birth decreased with earlier smoking cessation in pregnancy — up to a 20 per cent relative decrease if cessation occurred at the beginning of pregnancy. Pixabay

However, the study also found that only about 25 per cent of women who smoked prior to pregnancy were able to quit throughout their pregnancy, and approximately 50 per cent of women who smoked during their pregnancy did so with high frequency (more than 10 cigarettes per day).

The researcher plans to look at quit rates and smoking intensity and their impact on the risk of infant mortality.

Also Read: How Netflix Binge-Watching Can Lead You The “Mean World Syndrome”

“Thankfully most premature babies end up doing well,” he said.

“But premature birth is strongly linked to infant mortality. If we determine quitting, and quitting early, reduces the risk of infant mortality, then that may speak to mothers even more saliently about the importance of smoking cessation,” he added. (IANS)