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A Storm Bud Intensifies At West Of The Pacific Coast Of Mexico

There are no oil installations on the Pacific side of Mexico.

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A Storm Bud Intensifies At West Of The Pacific Coast Of Mexico
A Storm Bud Intensifies At West Of The Pacific Coast Of Mexico, VOA

Tropical Storm Bud intensified late Sunday afternoon into a Category 1 hurricane some 254 miles (410 km) west of the Pacific coast of Mexico, the country’s weather service said.

With maximum sustained winds of 75 miles (121 km) per hour and gusts of 93 miles (150 km) per hour, Bud was moving northwest at 9.3 miles (15 km) per hour.

The storm is the second of the 2018 Pacific hurricane season after Tropical Storm Aletta, which is moving west away from land. On the Atlantic side, Subtropical Storm Alberto slammed into the Mexican Caribbean in late May, forcing the evacuation of oil workers in the Gulf of Mexico and killing almost 10 people in Cuba and in the U.S. Southeast.

Within hours, Bud was due to generate intense storms in the Mexican states that border the Pacific Ocean, such as Jalisco, Colima and Guerrero.

The Miami-based U.S. National Hurricane Center said Bud would start to weaken by late Tuesday or early Wednesday.

Satellite picture of a hurricane
Satellite picture of a hurricane, Pixabay

There are no oil installations on the Pacific side of Mexico.

Although authorities established a surveillance zone to follow the trajectory of the hurricane northward along Mexico’s western coast, there were no evacuations of tourist spots like Acapulco, Puerto Vallarta and Cabo San Lucas.

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“People in the zones of the states with forecast of rains, wind and waves, including maritime navigation, are recommended to take extreme precautions and to comply with the recommendations issued by the authorities,” Mexico’s meteorological service said in a statement. (VOA)

Next Story

Mexico Mammoths: Human-Built Woolly Mammoth Traps Found in Tultepec

Researchers speculated that ancient hunters probably chased the giant animals into the pits, which are 1.70 meters deep and 25 meters in diameter

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Mexico, Mammoths, Human
In this undated photo released by Mexico's National Institute of Anthropology and History, mammoth bones lie at an excavation site in Tultepec, just north of Mexico City. VOA

Anthropologists have found skeletons of at least 14 woolly mammoths that died after falling into traps built by humans 15,000 years ago.

The two pits were found in Tultepec, just north of Mexico City, Mexico’s National Institute of Anthropology and History said this week.

Researchers speculated that ancient hunters probably chased the giant animals into the pits, which are 1.70 meters deep and 25 meters in diameter (5½ feet by 82 feet).

There was some evidence that some of the mammals had been butchered.

Mexico, Mammoths, Human
The two pits were found in Tultepec, just north of Mexico City, Mexico’s National Institute of Anthropology and History said this week. Pixabay

Luis Cordoba, the head of the excavation team, said the discovery was key in studying the relationship between prehistoric hunting and gathering communities and the huge herbivores.

“There was little evidence before that hunters attacked mammoths. It was thought they frightened them into getting stuck in swamps and then waited for them to die,” he told reporters. “This is evidence of direct attacks on mammoths. In Tultepec we can see there was the intention to hunt and make use of the mammoths.”

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The pits were found when crews were digging in the area to build a garbage dump.  (VOA)