Monday October 22, 2018
Home Lead Story A Storm Bud I...

A Storm Bud Intensifies At West Of The Pacific Coast Of Mexico

There are no oil installations on the Pacific side of Mexico.

0
//
33
A Storm Bud Intensifies At West Of The Pacific Coast Of Mexico
A Storm Bud Intensifies At West Of The Pacific Coast Of Mexico, VOA
Republish
Reprint

Tropical Storm Bud intensified late Sunday afternoon into a Category 1 hurricane some 254 miles (410 km) west of the Pacific coast of Mexico, the country’s weather service said.

With maximum sustained winds of 75 miles (121 km) per hour and gusts of 93 miles (150 km) per hour, Bud was moving northwest at 9.3 miles (15 km) per hour.

The storm is the second of the 2018 Pacific hurricane season after Tropical Storm Aletta, which is moving west away from land. On the Atlantic side, Subtropical Storm Alberto slammed into the Mexican Caribbean in late May, forcing the evacuation of oil workers in the Gulf of Mexico and killing almost 10 people in Cuba and in the U.S. Southeast.

Within hours, Bud was due to generate intense storms in the Mexican states that border the Pacific Ocean, such as Jalisco, Colima and Guerrero.

The Miami-based U.S. National Hurricane Center said Bud would start to weaken by late Tuesday or early Wednesday.

Satellite picture of a hurricane
Satellite picture of a hurricane, Pixabay

There are no oil installations on the Pacific side of Mexico.

Although authorities established a surveillance zone to follow the trajectory of the hurricane northward along Mexico’s western coast, there were no evacuations of tourist spots like Acapulco, Puerto Vallarta and Cabo San Lucas.

Also read:NASA probe unveils stormy environment of Jupiter’s moon

“People in the zones of the states with forecast of rains, wind and waves, including maritime navigation, are recommended to take extreme precautions and to comply with the recommendations issued by the authorities,” Mexico’s meteorological service said in a statement. (VOA)

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2018 NewsGram

Next Story

Casualties Continue To Occur Post Hurricane Michael

Residents began to return to the devastated town in search of anything that could help them rebuild their lives.

0
Hurricane Michael
Wes Allen Jr., from left, sits with his father, Wes, his sister, Alison and his mother, Vicki, outside their room at a damaged motel, Oct. 16, 2018, in Panama City, Fla., where many residents continue to live in the aftermath of Hurricane Michael. Many residents rode out the storm and have no place to go, even though many of the motel's rooms are uninhabitable. VOA

Almost a week after Hurricane Michael devastated the Florida Panhandle, Mexico Beach Mayor Al Cathey said two more deaths had been confirmed in the small seaside town.

Cathey said Tuesday that the victims were a man and a woman who lived in separate homes and had not evacuated. He did not give the victims’ names or say how they died.

The announcement brought to 12 the number of people killed in Bay County, which includes Mexico Beach and another hard-hit town, Panama City.

Climate Change, hurricane michael
Scenes of devastation in Mexico Beach, Florida in the aftermath for Hurricane Michael.. VOA

The county took a direct hit from Hurricane Michael, one of the most intense hurricanes to ever hit the United States.

According to the Associated Press, the storm death toll stood at 16 in Florida and 10 combined in Virginia, Georgia and North Carolina.

Life in the hard-hit areas improved drastically as widespread cellphone service returned Tuesday for the first time since the storm.

Residents began to return to the devastated town in search of anything that could help them rebuild their lives.

Climate Change, hurricane michael
Scenes of devastation in Mexico Beach, Florida in the aftermath for Hurricane Michael. VOA

“We really don’t know our plan. We just came to take a first look of the house, analyze and maybe come up with a long-term plan, hopefully,” Joseph Bran of Mexico Beach said as he searched through the debris of his home.

Also Read: A Weakened Hurricane Florence Is Still Dangerous

Another Mexico Beach resident looked on the bright side. “I love it here, the sunset is beautiful, and the Gulf of Mexico got the best fishes of the world,” Scott Collins said. (VOA)