Friday March 22, 2019

Blood sodium levels linked to cognition in older adults

For the study, to be published in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, researchers examined information on 5,435 asymptomatic community-dwelling men aged 65 years and above who were followed for a median of 4.6 years

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Research also found an association of high serum sodium (143-153 mmol/L) with cognitive decline over time. Wikimedia Commons
Research also found an association of high serum sodium (143-153 mmol/L) with cognitive decline over time. Wikimedia Commons

A lower level of sodium in the blood may affect cognitive functions with advancing age, a new study has warned.

Hyponatremia is a condition that occurs when the level of sodium in the blood falls below 135 Millimoles Per Litre (mmol/L).

The results indicate that sodium levels may help preserve cognition as individuals age.

“Slightly lower sodium levels in the blood are likely to be unnoticed in clinical practice,” said the co-author of the study, Kristen Nowak from the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus.

Also Read: Daily Exercise May Boost Better Lung Function Among Smokers

“Because both slightly lower serum sodium levels and mild changes in cognitive function are common occurrences with advancing age, future research on this topic is important — including determining whether correcting lower sodium levels affects cognitive function,” Nowak added.

A total of 100 men had serum levels indicative of hyponatremia. Wikimedia Commons
A total of 100 men had serum levels indicative of hyponatremia. Wikimedia Commons

For the study, to be published in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, researchers examined information on 5,435 asymptomatic community-dwelling men aged 65 years and above who were followed for a median of 4.6 years.

A total of 100 men had serum levels indicative of hyponatremia.

The researchers found that slightly lower sodium levels in the blood were related to both cognitive impairment and declines in cognitive function over time.

Also Read: Pollution, the silent killer in metros; 35 per cent children in India have poor lung capacity

Compared with men with sodium levels of 141-142 mmol/L, men with levels of 126-140 mmol/L were 30 percent more likely to have cognitive impairment at baseline and 37 percent more likely to experience cognitive decline over time.

They also found an association of high serum sodium (143-153 mmol/L) with cognitive decline over time. IANS

Next Story

Scientists Develop A New Technique to Measure Blood Clot

The technique, led by the University of Exeter researchers, investigates a part of the blood clotting process which focuses on the ways in which platelets from blood samples clump together.

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The researchers discovered that the enzyme NADPH Oxidase is critically important for the generation of free radicals, the stimulation of blood clotting and the promotion of blood vessel damage in patients. Pixabay

Scientists have developed a new technique that allows them to measure blood clotting as well as the formation of free radicals, that leads to the build-up of blood clots, which in turn cause heart disease, stroke and dementia.

The technique, led by the University of Exeter researchers, investigates a part of the blood clotting process which focuses on the ways in which platelets from blood samples clump together.

“This method may be useful for future studies looking into new anti-platelet treatments for diseases such as diabetes, where clotting is disturbed and increases the risk of heart attack or stroke,” according to the study detailed in the Haematologica journal.

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The technique, led by the University of Exeter researchers, investigates a part of the blood clotting process which focuses on the ways in which platelets from blood samples clump together. Pixabay

The researchers discovered that the enzyme NADPH Oxidase is critically important for the generation of free radicals, the stimulation of blood clotting and the promotion of blood vessel damage in patients.

They successfully used the technique in mice and human cells. Their aim is to better understand how blood cells function, which will help to develop new drugs against blood clotting diseases or to test the risk of clotting diseases in patients.

Also Read: Study Claims, There Should Be Treatment Options Given for Miscarriage

“We’re really excited to discover this new technique and its potential to understand how blood vessel diseases develop. For the first time, we can now simultaneously measure blood clotting and the formation of free radicals,” said lead author Giordano Pula, from the Exeter Medical School.

“We know they play a key role in blood vessel damage caused by ageing, diabetes, obesity and chronic inflammation. We’re currently using this technique in our efforts to develop a new treatment to protect the blood vessels in diseases such as heart diseases, stroke, obesity, and vascular dementia,” Pula added. (IANS)