Thursday October 18, 2018

Blood sodium levels linked to cognition in older adults

For the study, to be published in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, researchers examined information on 5,435 asymptomatic community-dwelling men aged 65 years and above who were followed for a median of 4.6 years

0
//
49
Research also found an association of high serum sodium (143-153 mmol/L) with cognitive decline over time. Wikimedia Commons
Research also found an association of high serum sodium (143-153 mmol/L) with cognitive decline over time. Wikimedia Commons
Republish
Reprint

A lower level of sodium in the blood may affect cognitive functions with advancing age, a new study has warned.

Hyponatremia is a condition that occurs when the level of sodium in the blood falls below 135 Millimoles Per Litre (mmol/L).

The results indicate that sodium levels may help preserve cognition as individuals age.

“Slightly lower sodium levels in the blood are likely to be unnoticed in clinical practice,” said the co-author of the study, Kristen Nowak from the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus.

Also Read: Daily Exercise May Boost Better Lung Function Among Smokers

“Because both slightly lower serum sodium levels and mild changes in cognitive function are common occurrences with advancing age, future research on this topic is important — including determining whether correcting lower sodium levels affects cognitive function,” Nowak added.

A total of 100 men had serum levels indicative of hyponatremia. Wikimedia Commons
A total of 100 men had serum levels indicative of hyponatremia. Wikimedia Commons

For the study, to be published in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, researchers examined information on 5,435 asymptomatic community-dwelling men aged 65 years and above who were followed for a median of 4.6 years.

A total of 100 men had serum levels indicative of hyponatremia.

The researchers found that slightly lower sodium levels in the blood were related to both cognitive impairment and declines in cognitive function over time.

Also Read: Pollution, the silent killer in metros; 35 per cent children in India have poor lung capacity

Compared with men with sodium levels of 141-142 mmol/L, men with levels of 126-140 mmol/L were 30 percent more likely to have cognitive impairment at baseline and 37 percent more likely to experience cognitive decline over time.

They also found an association of high serum sodium (143-153 mmol/L) with cognitive decline over time. IANS

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2018 NewsGram

Next Story

Sleep For Less Than 6 Hours Increases Health Risk: Study

The research also showed that people who had short or disrupted sleep were also more likely to have metabolic syndrome.

0
sleeping
Less than 6 hours of sleep linked to hardened arteries Pixabay

Sleeping less than six hours or waking up several times in the night is associated with an increased risk of asymptomatic atherosclerosis, which silently hardens and narrows arteries, warns a study.

“Failure to get enough sleep and restlessness during the night should be considered risk factors for blocking or narrowing of the arteries,” said study author Fernando Dominguez of the Spanish National Centre for Cardiovascular Research (CNIC) in Madrid.

The study, presented at the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Congress 2018 in Munich, Germany, involved nearly 4,000 healthy middle-aged adults who wore a waist band activity monitor for seven days to record sleep quality and quantity.

They were divided into five groups according to the proportion of fragmented sleep, and four groups designating average hours slept a night – less than six (very short), six to seven (short), seven to eight (the reference), and more than eight (long).

Atherosclerosis, sleep
Atherosclerosis, the narrowing of arteries. Flickr

Atherosclerosis, the narrowing of arteries due to plaque build-up on the artery walls, was assessed in leg and neck arteries using three-dimensional ultrasound.

The average age of participants was 46 years and 63 per cent were men.

The researchers found that those in the highest quintile of fragmented sleep were more likely to have multiple sections of arteries with atherosclerosis compared to those in the lowest quintile.

“Studies are needed to find out if sleeping well and long enough can prevent or reverse this effect on the arteries,” Dominguez said.

sleeping
The average age of participants was 46 years and 63 per cent were men.
Pixabay

“In the meantime, it seems sensible to take steps to get a good night’s sleep — such as having a physically active lifestyle and avoiding coffee and fatty foods before bedtime,” Dominguez added.

Also Read: There’s No Healthy Level for Consuming Alcohol, Lancet Study Confirms

The research also showed that people who had short or disrupted sleep were also more likely to have metabolic syndrome, which refers to the combination of diabetes, high blood pressure, and obesity, and depicts an unhealthy lifestyle. (IANS)