Wednesday August 15, 2018
Home Science & Technology Can you devel...

Can you develop Electricity from Human Urine?

Mexican scientist and the Argentinians have come up with easily available resources for generating electricity

0
//
175
Republish
Reprint

November 22, 2016: Recycling and reusing have become very useful method for creating energy and electricity. They are not only environment-friendly but also easily available energies. We have seen cow dung being used as important energy resource for producing biogas. Recently a Mexican scientist Gabrial Luna-Sandoval has come up with a new invention whereby human urine can be used for generating electricity.

Humans pee about one and half liters a day. Gabrial’s new machine processes them and the urine gets turned into biogas which serves as a household heater to take a hot shower or can be used for cooking as well. The machine uses electrolysis and hydrogen in urine to produce biogas. This creates electricity or replaces natural gas.

[bctt tweet=”Humans pee about one and half liters a day.” username=””]

According to Dr. Gabrial “15 ml urine is enough considering that we produce 1.4 liters of urine and if there are 3-4 members in family then the family can pay enough to cook”. This method of electricity generation can have far reaching consequences, it can be used for future calling use in Mars.

Even the water used for energy will not go waste, as the filtered water can be used for drinking purpose as well. These are the certain possibilities that it has.

NewsGram brings to you current foreign news from all over the world.

British researchers, on the other hand, have developed microbial fuel cells that use live bacteria that feed on to inter-generate electricity.

Argentina is not lagging behind in generating renewable energy volunteers from Sumando Inerhias are recycling the trash to create solar energy. This will help in running water power heaters. This will be a great source of relaxation for communities that lack electricity and water. Apart from creating solar energy, they are also teaching them about recycling. Thus it’s a two-fold benefit scheme for the community, as it can not only use the energy but can even actively take part in its generation.

plastic cans and bottles being used for generating solar energy
Community participation in creating energy out of trash, Wikimedia

A local resident Angel Guelari says that ‘these are things that we throw away and they contaminate the environment, we can use them for practical things like having water in the house it’s good to recycle.’ Sumando Inerhias saw an increase in its number of volunteers over the years and they hope to build solar panels for three thousand families per year now, as reported by VOA news from Washington DC.

Renewable energy is not only cleaner but also safer and less polluting technique in the generation of energy. The shortage of resources can be curbed by switching over to a renewable form of energy.  Community participation plays an important role in these forms of energy. It helps in creating awareness and judicious use of resources.

prepared by Saptaparni Goon of NewsGram. Twitter: @saptaparni_goon

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2016 NewsGram

Next Story

Aadhaar Helpline Mystery: French Security Expert Tweets of doing a Full Disclosure Tomorrow about Code of the Google SetUP Wizard App

0
Google Along with Other SSocial Media Giants will Face The Lawmakers, Wikimedia Commons
Google Along with Other SSocial Media Giants will Face The Lawmakers, Wikimedia Commons

Google’s admission that it had in 2014 inadvertently coded the 112 distress number and the UIDAI helpline number into its setup wizard for Android devices triggered another controversy on Saturday as India’s telecom regulator had only recommended the use of 112 as an emergency number in April 2015.

After a large section of smartphone users in India saw a toll-free helpline number of UIDAI saved in their phone-books by default, Google issued a statement, saying its “internal review revealed that in 2014, the then UIDAI helpline number and the 112 distress helpline number were inadvertently coded into the SetUp wizard of the Android release given to OEMs for use in India and has remained there since”.

Aadhaar Helpline Number Mystery: French security expert tweets of doing a full disclosure tomorrow about Code of the Google SetUP Wizard App, Image: Wikimedia Commons.

However, the Telecom Regulatory Authority of India (TRAI) recommended only in April 2015 that the number 112 be adopted as the single emergency number for the country.

According to Google, “since the numbers get listed on a user’s contact list, these get  transferred accordingly to the contacts on any new device”.

Google was yet to comment on the new development.

Meanwhile, French security expert that goes by the name of Elliot Alderson and has been at the core of the entire Aadhaar controversy, tweeted on Saturday: “I just found something interesting. I will probably do full disclosure tomorrow”.

“I’m digging into the code of the @Google SetupWizard app and I found that”.

“As far as I can see this object is not used in the current code, so there is no implications. This is just a poor coding practice in term of security,” he further tweeted.

On Friday, both the Unique Identification Authority of India (UIDAI) as well as the telecom operators washed their hand of the issue.

While the telecom industry denied any role in the strange incident, the UIDAI said that he strange incident, the UIDAI said that some vested interests were trying to create “unwarranted confusion” in the public and clarified that it had not asked any manufacturer or telecom service provider to provide any such facility.

Twitter was abuzz with the new development after a huge uproar due to Telecom Regulatory Authority of India (TRAI) Chairman R.S. Sharma’s open Aadhaar challenge to critics and hackers.

Ethical hackers exposed at least 14 personal details of the TRAI Chairman, including mobile numbers, home address, date of birth, PAN number and voter ID among others. (IANS)

Also Read: Why India Is Still Nowhere Near Securing Its Citizens’ Data?