Thursday November 14, 2019
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Can you develop Electricity from Human Urine?

Mexican scientist and the Argentinians have come up with easily available resources for generating electricity

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November 22, 2016: Recycling and reusing have become very useful method for creating energy and electricity. They are not only environment-friendly but also easily available energies. We have seen cow dung being used as important energy resource for producing biogas. Recently a Mexican scientist Gabrial Luna-Sandoval has come up with a new invention whereby human urine can be used for generating electricity.

Humans pee about one and half liters a day. Gabrial’s new machine processes them and the urine gets turned into biogas which serves as a household heater to take a hot shower or can be used for cooking as well. The machine uses electrolysis and hydrogen in urine to produce biogas. This creates electricity or replaces natural gas.

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According to Dr. Gabrial “15 ml urine is enough considering that we produce 1.4 liters of urine and if there are 3-4 members in family then the family can pay enough to cook”. This method of electricity generation can have far reaching consequences, it can be used for future calling use in Mars.

Even the water used for energy will not go waste, as the filtered water can be used for drinking purpose as well. These are the certain possibilities that it has.

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British researchers, on the other hand, have developed microbial fuel cells that use live bacteria that feed on to inter-generate electricity.

Argentina is not lagging behind in generating renewable energy volunteers from Sumando Inerhias are recycling the trash to create solar energy. This will help in running water power heaters. This will be a great source of relaxation for communities that lack electricity and water. Apart from creating solar energy, they are also teaching them about recycling. Thus it’s a two-fold benefit scheme for the community, as it can not only use the energy but can even actively take part in its generation.

plastic cans and bottles being used for generating solar energy
Community participation in creating energy out of trash, Wikimedia

A local resident Angel Guelari says that ‘these are things that we throw away and they contaminate the environment, we can use them for practical things like having water in the house it’s good to recycle.’ Sumando Inerhias saw an increase in its number of volunteers over the years and they hope to build solar panels for three thousand families per year now, as reported by VOA news from Washington DC.

Renewable energy is not only cleaner but also safer and less polluting technique in the generation of energy. The shortage of resources can be curbed by switching over to a renewable form of energy.  Community participation plays an important role in these forms of energy. It helps in creating awareness and judicious use of resources.

prepared by Saptaparni Goon of NewsGram. Twitter: @saptaparni_goon

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Scientists: Nations Need Stronger Pledges to Curb Climate Change

Governments are moving in the right direction, but nowhere near enough, so hopefully they will be willing to take on much stronger commitments

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Scientists, Nations, Climate Change
A woman wearing a mask walks past buildings on a polluted day in Handan, Hebei province, China, Jan. 12, 2019. China is reportedly the world's top emitter of greenhouse gases. VOA

The vast majority of national commitments in the 2015 Paris Agreement are inadequate to prevent the worst effects of global warming, scientists said on Tuesday, naming the world’s biggest greenhouse gas emitting countries as among those that must ratchet up their efforts.

“Governments are moving in the right direction, but nowhere near enough, so hopefully they will be willing to take on much stronger commitments” in next month’s United Nation’s climate summit in Spain, said Robert Watson, lead author of the report by the nonprofit Universal Ecological Fund.

The report ranked nearly 75%, or 136, of the pledges as insufficient, including ones by major carbon emitters China, the United States, and India. A dozen, by countries including Australia, Japan and Brazil, were judged only partially sufficient.

Countries at next month’s summit in Madrid will hash out some details of the international pact to curb warming. Chile withdrew as host following weeks of riots protesting inequality.

Scientists, Nations, Climate Change
A protestor holds a placard in front of the India Gate during a protest demanding government to take immediate steps to control air pollution in New Delhi, India, Nov. 5, 2019. VOA

Of the 184 pledges countries made under the climate agreement, only 36 are ambitious enough to help reach the agreement’s goal of keeping global warming less than 1.5 Celsius (2.7 F) above pre-industrial levels, the report said.

Most of those 36 are by countries in the European Union.

Watson, a former chair of the U.N. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, said the report could be read two ways: “You can read ‘My God it’s hopeless’, or ‘My God this is a wake up call.'”

Watson estimated that even if all nations meet their existing pledges, the world would be headed for temperature rise of between 3 and 3.5 degrees Celsius, which could lead to more extreme weather, rising sea levels and the loss of plant and animal species.

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The report rated the European Union’s 28 member states as having sufficient pledges because they aim to cut emissions of greenhouse gases by at least 40% below the 1990 level by 2030.

It ranked the United States as insufficient because President Donald Trump reversed former President Barack Obama’s climate policies and yanked Washington out of the pact. The administration, which argues that Paris Agreement would cost U.S. taxpayers too much money, filed official paperwork on Monday to withdraw.

China, the world’s top emitter of greenhouse gases, and India, also came in as insufficient because their pledges focus on carbon intensity targets, which lower emissions per unit of gross domestic product, or GDP. Because those economies are growing and coal produces much of their electricity, total emissions have risen sharply even though carbon intensity levels in China and India have fallen. (VOA)