Wednesday October 17, 2018
Home Uncategorized China Re-asse...

China Re-asserts it is against Self-Determination for Taiwan

China has regarded Taiwan as a wayward province, to be taken by force if necessary, ever since defeated Nationalists fled to Taiwan in 1949 after a civil war with China's Communists.

0
//
110
Shipping containers at Keelung port, northern Taiwan. The new government wants to seek more diverse trade partners apart from China, in order to revive shrinking trade and boost a stagnating economy. Photo: Reuters
Republish
Reprint

1.3 billion people in China are resolute and united in their decision that they will never allow self-ruled Taiwan to come under Beijing’s ‘One China’ principle, China’s top official in charge of ties with the island said on Thursday, in Beijing’s latest blast at Taipei.

Leader Tsai Ing-wen of Taiwan’s pro-independence Democratic Progressive Party was repeatedly warned by China to join the ‘One China’ principle but the leader assumed that negative consequences might follow if they decide otherwise.

In an inaugural speech by Tsai on Friday, she urged China to keep aside the baggage of history and engage in a positive dialogue. She added that democratic principles will rule Taiwan’s ties with Beijing and peace and unity can be restored.

A meeting took place between Taiwan business representatives where the Head of China’s Taiwan Affairs Office, Zhang Zhijun said, going against “One China” principle will only create an atmosphere of tension and have a negative influence on the ties.

Taiwan’s President Tsai Ing-wen addresses during an inauguration ceremony in Taipei, Taiwan May 20, 2016. REUTERS/Tyrone Siu
Taiwan’s President Tsai Ing-wen addresses during an inauguration ceremony in Taipei, Taiwan May 20, 2016. REUTERS/Tyrone Siu

“There is no future in Taiwan independence, and this cannot become an option for Taiwan’s future. This is the conclusion of history,” Zhang said.

“Some people say you must pay attention to broad public opinion in Taiwan, and that one can understand the attitude and feelings of Taiwan’s people formed by its special historical experiences and social environment,” Zhang added.

“But, Taiwan society ought to understand and attach importance to the feelings of the 1.37 billion residents of the mainland,” he further added.

In 1949, ever since the defeated Nationalists have fled to Taiwan after a civil war with China’s communists, China has regarded Taiwan as a unruly province, to be taken by force if the situation demands so.

Foreign powers intruded and carved off bits of the declining Chinese empire for themselves in the late 19th and the early 20th century. People of China still have a painful and deep memory of the period of humiliation and national weakness.

“They have a rock-solid will that has remained consistent towards protecting national unity and not allowing the country to be split,” said Zhang.

In response to Zhang’s comments, the Mainland Affairs Council, Taiwan’s ministerial agency in charge of ties with China said, Tsai has committed to ensure the status quo in relations with China and to sustain peace and stability.

From 1895-1945, Taiwan was a part of the Japanese colony and gained the control of the island from imperial China. Therefore, China doesn’t permit the public discussion of views that will challenge the notion of Taiwan being a fragment of China.

Most of the Taiwanese feel that that the Japanese rule had a positive effect on their land. It brought progress to an undeveloped island where only agriculture prevailed. (Reuters)

ALSO READ:

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2016 NewsGram

Next Story

Sundar Pichai Clears Google’s China Centric Plans

Google had launched a search engine in China in 2006 but pulled the plug in 2010

0
Google
Google CEO Sundar Pichai speaks during a news conference in New Delhi. VOA

 Google CEO Sundar Pichai has for the first time gone public about his company’s China-centric plans and has stressed on its need to re-enter the Asian nation that has the world’s largest population, a media report said.

Pichai was speaking on Monday at Wired Magazine’s 25th anniversary summit here in the US.

Since China is an important market, Google is developing a censored search-engine for Beijing codenamed “Dragonfly” that would filter content deemed sensitive by its ruling Communist Party regime.

Google
Google CEO Sundar Pichai speaks at the Google I/O conference in Mountain View, Calif

“We wanted to learn what it would look like if Google were in China. It’s very early and we don’t know whether we would or could do this in China but we felt like it was important for us to explore, given how important the market is and how many users there are,” The Verge quoted Pichai as saying.

Information regarding Google’s “Dragonfly” project began surfacing in August and since then the company has faced severe backlash from its employees as well as the US government.

Google’s plan to launch the censored browser has come under heavy criticism from one of its former Asia-Pacific head of free expression who called it a “stupid move”.

In September, Google reportedly developed a prototype of “Dragonfly” that linked users’ search history to their personal phone numbers allowing security agencies to easily track users seeking out information banned by the government.

Google
Google’s plan to launch the censored browser has come under heavy criticism from one of its former Asia-Pacific head. VOA

Along with former Google Senior Scientist Jack Poulson, several other employees have resigned from the company citing lack of corporate transparency after it revealed its efforts about “Dragonfly”.

The company has been guarding the China-project details against the US Congress.

Appearing before members of the US Congress at a Senate Commerce Committee hearing in September end, Google’s Chief Privacy Officer, Keith Enright confirmed that the China search project does exist, but did not disclose much.

President Donald Trump’s administration has also asked Google to shun the “Dragonfly” project.

Google CEO Sundar Pichai
Google CEO Sundar Pichai. (Wikimedia Commons)

 

Though Pichai describes his company’s China plans as very preliminary, it is clear that backlash within and outside the company has been vocal and will only intensify in future, the report added.

Also Read: U.S. Government Warns People Against China-Linked Hacking Group

Google had launched a search engine in China in 2006 but pulled the plug in 2010, citing Chinese government efforts to limit free speech and block websites. (IANS)