Wednesday December 11, 2019

Chronic Diseases Raise Cancer and Mortality Risk

Chronic diseases are not yet a target in cancer prevention schemes 

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Chronic diseases are not yet included in cancer prevention schemes.
Chronic diseases are not yet included in cancer prevention schemes.
  • Many chronic diseases are found to have been the cause of cancer
  • This also has an effect on the mortality rate
  • Chronic diseases are not yet a target in cancer prevention schemes

Several common chronic diseases including hypertension, heart disease and diabetes, together account for more than a fifth of new cancer cases and more than a third of cancer deaths, finds a study.

Chronic diseases were responsible for 71 per cent of deaths globally in 2015, primarily from cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, chronic kidney disease, and respiratory disease, according to the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015, published in the Lancet.

Chronic diseases can cause cancer as well.
Chronic diseases can cause cancer as well.

The study found that cardiovascular disease markers, diabetes, chronic kidney disease markers, pulmonary disease, and gouty arthritis marker were individually associated with risk of developing cancer or cancer death.

Also Read: Colorectal Cancer Rising Among Young Adults

High chronic disease risk scores were also associated with substantial reduction in life span.

The highest scores were associated with 13.3 years of life lost in men and 15.9 years of life lost in women.

They also found that physical activity was associated with a nearly 40 per cent reduction in the excess risks of cancer and cancer death associated with chronic diseases and markers.

Other than chronic diseases, lifestyle habits like smoking causes cancer too. Pixabay
Other than chronic diseases, lifestyle habits like smoking causes cancer too. Pixabay

Besides, chronic diseases, lifestyle factors like smoking, insufficient physical activity, insufficient fruit and vegetable intake, alcohol consumption, also lead to cancer, said the researchers led by Xifeng Wu, Professor at the University of Texas in Houston, US.

Also Read: Alcohol can be linked with seven types of Cancer: Research

According to the study, published in the journal BJM, chronic diseases are not targeted in the current cancer prevention strategies.

Studies have shown that certain chronic diseases may predispose to cancer, but these studies generally assessed chronic diseases or disease markers individually.

Cancer prevention schemes are now focusing on chronic diseases as well. IANS
Cancer prevention schemes are now focusing on chronic diseases as well. IANS

Yet chronic diseases tend to be clustered together, so there is a need to understand more about their joint impact on cancer risk, the researchers mentioned.

For the study, the team included 405,878 men and women with no history of cancer.

They investigated the combined effect of eight common chronic diseases or disease markers on cancer risk compared with lifestyle factors. IANS

Next Story

Physical illness And injury Raises The Risk of Suicide in Men, Not Women: Study

The researchers also found new potential risk patterns, including that diagnoses and prescriptions four years before a suicide were more important to prediction than diagnoses

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Suicide is incredibly challenging to predict, because every suicide death is the result of multiple interacting risk factors in one's life, Especially for Men. Pixabay

When it comes to identify who is more at suicide risk, scientists have found that physical illness and injury raises the risk of Suicide in Men but not women, along with a plethora of other insights into the complex factors that may increase a person’s risk of suicide.

The study, led by Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) and published in JAMA Psychiatry, is the first to use data from the population of an entire country (Denmark) and parse it with a Machine Learning (ML) system to identify suicide risk factors.

“Suicide is incredibly challenging to predict, because every suicide death is the result of multiple interacting risk factors in one’s life,” said lead study author Dr Jaimie Gradus, associate professor of epidemiology at BUSPH.

Dr Gradus and her colleagues looked at thousands of factors in the health histories of 14,103 individuals who died from suicide in the country from 1995 through 2015, and the health histories of 265,183 other Danes in the same period, using a machine-learning system to look for patterns.

Many of the study’s findings confirmed previously-identified risk factors, such as psychiatric disorders and related prescriptions.

Men
When it comes to identify who is more at suicide risk, scientists have found that physical illness and injury raises the risk of Suicide in Men but not women, along with a plethora of other insights into the complex factors that may increase a person’s risk of suicide. Pixabay

The researchers also found new potential risk patterns, including that diagnoses and prescriptions four years before a suicide were more important to prediction than diagnoses and prescriptions six months before, and that physical health diagnoses were particularly important to men’s suicide prediction but not women’s.

ALSO READ: JBL Unveils its New Wireless Earbuds in India

“The findings of this study do not create a model for perfectly predicting suicide”, said Dr Gradus, in part because medical records rarely include the more immediate experiences — such as the loss of a job or relationship — that combine with these longer-term factors to precipitate suicide.

The findings, however, point to new factors to examine in working to prevent this persistent public health issue. (IANS)