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Democratic Indian-American Raja Krishnamoorthi Wins 8th Congressional District of Illinois

Krishnamoorthi served as deputy treasurer of Illinois in 2007 after he was appointed special assistant attorney general in Public Integrity Unit by Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan

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Raja Krishnamoorthi, Twitter

by Himani Kumar 

Chicago, November 8, 2016:  It was finally a victory for Raja Krishnamoorthi as he won the 8th Congressional District of Illinois on election night yesterday and became a Congressman.

With this, he became the second Indian American to join the U.S. Congress after Amy Bera from California. It  was indeed a  victory for people belonging to the middle-class section in the society.

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His journey started in 2010. On Tuesday night, Krishnamoorthi has beaten republican candidate Pete DiCianni to win the 8th congressional district seat,  that  was occupied by Tammy Duckworth to whom Raja lost in 2012 in the Democratic Primary for the 8th district house seat.

“Yesterday is history, tomorrow is a mystery, today is a gift.. a present,’’ Krishnamoorthi said, quoting cartoonist Bil Keane at the Wyndham Garden in Schaumburg, where the victory party was celebrated before the race was called.

“I’ll work for the middle class, small businesses, and increase employment,” Raja added resonating with the people, as he was a small business owner himself and told that he knew their problems.

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Krishnamoorthi thanked his family, his friends and campaign manager Noah Wasserman after winning the seat. “You can call me Raja…not Congressman Raja…, he added,” trying to strike a chord with the common man. “I’ll work for the Hindus, Muslims, Sikhs, Jains and others,” he added.

“It is a coming out of the South Asian community tonight,” he said as his family members gather on stage and flouted the Cubs’ “Fly The W” flag  commemorating the recent win by the Cubs baseball team.

Several prominent members of the Indian and American community were present at the event.

“Raja’s coming to power is good for employment and for our community,” Hema Shastri of Bensenville said.

Her father-in-law Dr C. L. Shastri was instrumental in building the Manav Seva temple in Bensenville in Illinois, one of the oldest temples built in the United States.

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“American Indians need at least five Congressmen in the White House and we just have one Congressman Amy Bera from California, compared to our population of 1 percent in America,” Raja’s wife Priya, an anesthesiologist said.

Anuja  Gupta helped with building the  first retirement community for Indian people in Schaumburg called “Verandah” that was inaugurated on October 1, this year. “There are enough older Indians in Chicagoland,” she said. “It’s exciting for Raja to win,” Gupta said. “ I hosted a fundraiser in my house and raised $14,000 for his campaign.”

Krishnamoorthi served as deputy treasurer of Illinois in 2007 after he was appointed special assistant attorney general in Public Integrity Unit by Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan.

A Harvard law school  graduate, he was once also a partner at law firm Kirkland and Ellis.

Krishnamoorthi currently also is the  president of Bolingbrook’s Sivananthan Laboratories. The company focuses on research, development and commercialization of military night vision technology, solar cells, radiation detectors and biosensors to detect weapons of mass destruction.

Krishnamoorthi joins Kamala Harris from California, Ro Khanna from California’s 17th District and Pramila Jayapal from Seattle among the Indian Americans entering U.S. Congress. There is still no call in the race between Amy Bera from California and Scott Jones.

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Indian-American scientist wins ‘Inventor of the Year’ award for Improving AI Capablities

Scientist Rajiv V. Joshi is an Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Bombay alumnus

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Indian-American scientist Rajiv V. Joshi won the Inventor of the Year Award. (Representative Image). Pixabay

Indian-American scientist Rajiv V. Joshi has won the New York Intellectual Property Law Associations Inventor of the Year Award for his pioneering work in advancing the electronic industry and improving Artificial Intelligence (AI) capabilities, it was reported.

An Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Bombay alumnus, Joshi was presented the 2020 award “in recognition of the contribution that the invention has and/or will make towards society as a whole” earlier this month during a virtual awards ceremony, said the American Bazaar report on Friday.

A research staff member at IBM’s Thomas J. Watson Research Center, Joshi holds 235 US patents.

His work focuses on the development of integrated circuits and memory chips.

He is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and received the Industrial Pioneer Award from the IEEE Circuits and Systems Society in 2013 and the IEEE Daniel E. Noble Award in 2018.

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Scientist Rajiv V. Joshi is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. Pixabay

Joshi holds a B.Tech. degree in mechanical engineering from IIT Bombay. He came to the US in 1977 to pursue a master’s degree at MIT and a doctoral degree at Columbia University.

According to Joshi’s biography, his novel interconnects processes and structures for aluminium, tungsten, and copper technologies are widely used in IBM for various technologies.

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Joshi has extensively worked on novel memory designs and commercialized these techniques. He received three Outstanding Technical Achievements (OTAs) and three highest Corporate Patent Portfolio Awards for licensing contributions.

A Distinguished Visiting Professor with IIT Roorkee, he was inducted into the New Jersey Inventor Hall of Fame in August 2014 along with the pioneer Nicola Tesla. (IANS)

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Indian-American Businessman Urges Trump to Reopen with “common sense precautions”

Danny Gaekwad, Indian-American businessman has urged Trump's administration to reopen the country's economy with "common sense precautions"

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Reopen the country's economy with "common sense precautions", suggests Indian-American businessman. Pixabay

A prominent Indian-American businessman has urged US President Donald Trump administration to reopen the country’s economy with “common sense precautions”, highlighting the struggles America’s hoteliers were facing during the COVID-19 lockdown, the media reported.

Speaking at a roundtable of hospitality and tourism industry, hosted by Vice President Mike Pence in Orlando on Wednesday, Danny Gaekwad, Chairman of OSEM Hospitality Management, said such a move will “help our industry and our state get our economy moving again”, the American Bazaar reported on Thursday. Gaekwad was speaking as a representative of the Asian American Hotel Owners Association (AAHOA).

Besides Pence, the event was attended by Labor Secretary Eugene Scalia, Florida Governor Ron DeSantis and several prominent business leaders from the state. Gaekwad and other industry leaders proposed a number of steps and a phased reopening of the economy. “This pandemic hit the hotel industry particularly hard, and owners and employees alike continue to struggle,” said Gaekwad, also a prominent Republican donor, told Pence.

“Reopening our businesses with common sense precautions that prioritize the health and wellbeing of employees and guests will help our industry and our state get our economy moving again.” Gaekwad, a resident of Ocala, in central Florida, drew Pence’s attention on the liquidity crisis members of AAHOA, who own nearly one in every two hotels in the country, were facing.

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Industry leaders proposed a number of steps and a phased reopening of the economy to Trump administration. Pixabay

“If there is no guest, there is no dollar. If there is no dollar, don’t even think about liquidity. Do we have liquidity? Absolutely not,” the American Bazaar quoted the businessman as saying.

Also Read: Alarming Rate of Deforestation Threatens Biodiversity

“As an immigrant, my whole family works in a business because it does bother us. I represent here more than 20,000 (AAOHA) members. We all came with an American Dream. I thought I saw 9/11, I thought I saw the greatest recession. I have never seen this and I was never prepared for this.” (IANS)

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What is the Future of US-India Relations? Here’s the Answer

The US presidential elections and future of India-US relations

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India USA
Given the love fests of Prime Minister Narendra Modi's 'Howdy Modi' event in Houston, Texas, in which Trump participated in September of 2019, and Trump's 'Namaste Trump' event hosted by Modi in India in February of this year, it might be assumed that the future for US-India relations is a splendid one. Wikimedia Commons

BY FRANK F. ISLAM

As the coronavirus pandemic dominates global news in the United States, progress toward the next presidential election scheduled to be held on November 3 moves slowly forward. President Donald Trump had no real opposition in the Republican party and is running for re-election. And it has now become apparent that former Vice President Joe Biden will be his opponent as the Democratic candidate for president.

What would a Trump victory bode for the future of US-India relations? What would a Biden victory bode? Let me answer each of those questions in turn.

Given the love fests of Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s ‘Howdy Modi’ event in Houston, Texas, in which Trump participated in September of 2019, and Trump’s ‘Namaste Trump’ event hosted by Modi in India in February of this year, it might be assumed that the future for US-India relations is a splendid one. This would be an incorrect assumption.

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Both of these events were more symbolic than substantive. Trump’s participation in them undoubtedly helped to persuade some — perhaps many — Indian American Modi supporters who voted for Hillary Clinton in 2016 to cast their ballots for Trump in 2020. Trump’s campaign team took steps to ensure this by holding an event at his Mar-a-Lago resort in which a group of prominent Indian Americans announced their plans to work for his re-election and to mobilize Indian Americans on his behalf.

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It is essential that India and the US develop a strategic relationship that enables them to become those indispensable partners. Wikimedia Commons

To understand the future potential of India’s relations with the US. with Trump as president, however, it is necessary to look beyond these political moves and to examine the present state of those relations and Trump’s personal style.

In a word, the best way to characterize the current relations between the US and India is “functional”. The relationship was relatively good for the first two years of Trump’s presidency. In fact, near the end of 2018, Alice Wells, the Acting Assistant Secretary of State for South and Central Asia, was quoted in the media s saying: “This has been a landmark year for US-India ties as we build out stronger relationships across the board.”

Then, in 2019, the relations went off the track in the first half of the year after the US and India got into a tit-for-tat tariff war after the US terminated India’s Generalized System of Preferences which allowed India to send certain goods to the US duty-free. There have been continuing efforts to structure a “modest” trade deal since then. It was thought there might be some type of deal done in September of 2019 while Modi was in the US by year’s end, and then during Trump’s India visit. But, as of today, there is still no deal.

This inability to get any meaningful trade agreement in place speaks volumes about India’s potential future relations with India with Trump as president. So, too does Trump’s style.

Trump’s campaign slogans this time around are “Keep America Great” and “Promises Made, Promises Kept.” Trump is not a policy wonk and most of his effort will go toward “America First”. This involves making the US more isolated by withdrawing from international agreements, restructuring trade agreements, emphasizing building walls to stop immigrants at the border, using tariffs to block trade with countries who are taking away American jobs, and confronting businesses who are allegedlly stealing American trade secrets.

This perspective suggests what India can expect for its relations with the US if it has to deal with Trump for a second term as president. The relations will stay functional at best. As I have said before, that’s because the words partnership, cooperation and collaboration are not in Trump’s vocabulary. Nationalism, isolationism and protectionism are.

Joe Biden stands in stark contrast to President Trump both professionally and personally. Biden is a strategic thinker and doer with a solid eight-year track record of leadership experience as Vice-President in forging alliances that have made a difference around the world and he has also been a long-standing friend of India.

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To understand the future potential of India’s relations with the US. with Trump as president, however, it is necessary to look beyond these political moves and to examine the present state of those relations and Trump’s personal style. Wikimedia Commons

He was chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee and a leading advocate for the Congressional passage of the Indo-US civic nuclear deal in 2005. At a dinner convened 10 years later in 2015 by the Confederation of Indian Industry and the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, Vice President Biden discussed the tremendous joint progress that had been made by the two countries in the past and declared “We are on the cusp of a sea change decade.”

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Early in his campaign for the Democratic nomination for president in July of 2019, in laying out his foreign policy vision, Biden stated that the US had to reach out to India and other Asian partners to strengthen ties with them. The items on Biden’s foreign policy agenda for strengthening which are of importance for India include climate change, nuclear proliferation and cyberwarfare.

During his vice presidency, Biden worked side by side with President Barack Obama to do things that would contribute to achieving Obama’s vision stated in 2010 of India and America being “indispensable partners in meeting the challenges of our time.” In 2020, those challenges are even greater than they were a decade ago.

That is why it is so essential that India and the US develop a strategic relationship that enables them to become those indispensable partners. That can happen if Biden assumes the presidency on January 20, 2021. It cannot happen if Donald Trump remains as president for a second term.

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The results of this upcoming election in the US matter greatly for the future of the United States. They matter greatly for the future of India-US relations as well. Time and the American electorate will tell what that future will be. (IANS)