Saturday October 20, 2018

E-cigarettes which have become popular among Adults, are not to be used by Children: US Health Official

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration banned the sale of the devices to anyone under 18 earlier this year

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FILE - A smoker exhales vapor from an e-cigarette at the Vapor Spot, in Sacramento, California, in this July 7, 2015, photo. VOA
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December 9, 2016: E-cigarettes should not be used by kids, the top U.S. health official says.

The devices, which have become popular among adults looking for a healthier alternative to smoking, not only deliver nicotine but also can emit toxic substances like lead, diacetyl and nickel, according to U.S. Surgeon General Vivek Murthy who released a report on the devices.

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“All Americans need to know that e-cigarettes are dangerous to youth and young adults,” Murthy said. “Any tobacco use, including e-cigarettes, is a health threat, particularly to young people.”

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration banned the sale of the devices to anyone under 18 earlier this year.

Additionally, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said makers of e-cigs are directly targeting kids with exotic flavors and hip marketing. They have become the most popular nicotine delivery system among young people.

“The use of products containing nicotine poses dangers to youth, pregnant women and fetuses. The use of products containing nicotine in any form among youth, including e-cigarettes, is unsafe,” according to the Surgeon General’s report.

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Elaborating on the report, Murthy said there is confusion surrounding the safety of e-cigs.

“E-cigarettes went from being rare in 2010 to being the most common tobacco product used among our youth,” he said. “It also threatens 50 years of hard-fought progress we made curbing tobacco use.”

The U.S. government released a report in 2015 saying that one in six high school students used an e-cig within the last month.

“The report finds that, while nicotine is a highly addictive drug at any age, youth and young adults are uniquely vulnerable to the long-term consequences of exposing the brain to nicotine, and concludes that youth use of nicotine in any form is unsafe,” the Health and Human Services Department said.

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Those views were echoed by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

“Nicotine … is highly addictive and has clear neurotoxic effects,” Dr. Benard Dreyer, president of the American Academy of Pediatrics said at a news conference. “E-cigarettes have the potential to addict the next generation and it’s a major public health concern to us.”

Murthy added that parents, teachers and healthcare providers need to make sure kids know e-cigarettes are not safe.

“Today’s report gives them the facts about how these products can be harmful to young people’s health,” he said. (VOA)

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Additives in E-Cigarettes Impair Lung Functioning

However, respiratory mechanics were adversely affected only in mice exposed to cigarette smoke and not to e-cigarette vapour after prolonged treatment

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E-cigarette additives impair lung function: Study. ( Image Source: https://ecigarettereviewed.com/)

Flavouring and additive ingredients used in e-cigarettes are more likely to increase inflammation and impair lung function, according to new research.

E-cigarettes — popular battery-powered devices that simulate the act of smoking a traditional cigarette — dispense a vapour derived from liquid chemicals in a refillable cartridge.

Researchers from the University of Athens found that short-term exposure to e-cigarettes was enough to cause lung inflammation similar or worse than that seen in traditional cigarette use.

The study, published in the American Journal of Physiology – Lung Cellular and Molecular Physiology, examined several groups of mice that received whole-body exposure to varying chemical combinations four times each day.

Each exposure session was separated by 30-minute smoke-free intervals.

One group was exposed to cigarette smoke, another with e-cigarette vapour containing propylene glycol and vegetable glycerol — an odourless liquid derived from plant oils, the third with e-cigarette vapour containing propylene glycol and nicotine and another group was exposed to e-cigarette vapour containing propylene glycol, nicotine and tobacco flavouring.

e-cigarettes
In this April 11, 2018, photo, an unidentified 15-year-old high school student uses a vaping device near the school’s campus in Cambridge, Mass. Health and education officials across the country are raising alarms over wide underage use of e-cigarettes and other vaping products. The devices heat liquid into an inhalable vapor that’s sold in sugary flavors like mango and mint — and often with the addictive drug nicotine. VOA

The findings suggested an increase in markers of inflammation, mucus production and altered lung function in the propylene, propylene plus nicotine and flavouring groups after three days.

In addition, two inflammation-producing proteins became elevated only in the flavouring group, which suggested that some flavouring components on the market may not be safe for even short-term use.

The level of oxidative stress — stress at a cellular level — in the flavouring group was equal to or higher than that of the cigarette group.

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However, respiratory mechanics were adversely affected only in mice exposed to cigarette smoke and not to e-cigarette vapour after prolonged treatment.

“The observed detrimental effects in the lung upon (e-cigarette) vapour exposure in animal models highlight the need for further investigation of safety and toxicity of these rapidly expanding devices worldwide,” the researchers warned. (IANS)