Sunday November 19, 2017

For First Time in 130 Years, American Adults are Living more with their Parents than Partners in USA

White people, Black people, Asian/Pacific Islanders and Women with bachelor's degrees are still more likely to live with spouses or partners than with their mom and dad.

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32.1 percent of people live in their parents’ house, while 31.6 end up living with spouse or partner in their own homes and the rest live alone as single parent or in a home with renter/roommates.

According to a new analysis done by the Pew Research Center, after 130 years Americans aged between 18–34 are more likely to live with their parents than in other living situations.

“Alone/head of household” includes single parents and people who have roommates or renters living with them; “other” includes those living with family members (not parents), with non-family members or in group housing.

American People who come under the “other” includes those living with different family member (parents), or living in situation like group housing etc.  Single parents and people who have roommates or have renters living with them come under “alone/head of household”.

Pew also stated that this percentage is not a record high, for the people living with their parents as in 1940, 35 percent of people in the between that age group lived with their parents.

In those times living with your spouse or partner was a regular practice and popular. But today people prefer to live in alternate living situation, where they live either with mom or dad.

Men and women aged 18-34 in America have different allocation of time spent with parents. For instance men spend 35 percent of their time with parents, 28 percent with spouse or partner. But this is totally different in women’s case as they spend 35 percent of their time with their partner while 29 percent with parents.

Man_washing_dishes
Unemployed man doing dishes at home

The study also says that less educated adults are the ones who are more likely to live with their parents than are their college-educated counterparts due their financial prospects in today’s economy.

Black and Hispanic people are in the same situation when compared with white people.

Black people have always lived their parents since 1980 and it won’t be hard for them to reach a new milestone in this category. Today 17 percent black millennials with their spouse or partner, while 36 percent live with their parents.

White people, Black people, Asian/Pacific Islanders and Women with bachelor’s degrees are still more likely to live with spouses or partners than with their mom and dad.

Pew says unemployment is on rise and especially for male since last 5 years and even those who have jobs are earning less and they become economically dependent on parents and start living with them. Since 1970, due to inflation wages have been continuously falling.

Past decade has also seen fewer marriages between young people. In general, the study actually show how much the situation and standards of 18-34 year-old have changed since 1880, when the data begin.

Once living alone as a single parent or with roommates was rare but today it has become choice and more than 14 percent people live that way.

As the time passed male prosperity increased and more and more started leaving until the wage drop in 60’s and 70 ‘s which cause many to stay with their father’s place.

Women who worked on the other lived with their parents than with partner or spouse. As married women are discouraged from working.

But things have completely changed now and many young women jobs and it’s the unemployed women who more likely to stay with parents. And yet, even as female prosperity rose, so did the number of young women living at home.

-by Bhaskar Raghavendran

Bhaskar is a graduate in Journalism and mass communication and a reporter at NewsGram. Twitter handle: bhaskar_ragha

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Donald Trump Planning to meet Putin during his Asia tour

Donald Trump's first trip to Asia is the longest international tour.

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US President Donald Trump
US President Donald Trump. wikimedia commns
  • US President Donald Trump said on Sunday that he expected to meet his Russian counterpart Vladimir Putin during his Asia tour.

“I think it’s expected we’ll meet with Putin, yeah. We want Putin’s help on North Korea, and we’ll be meeting with a lot of different leaders,” Donald Trump told reporters on Air Force One before landing at the Yokota Air Base in Japan, Efe reported.

Putin is scheduled to participate in the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit in Da Nang, Vietnam, which Trump will also attend as part of his long Asia tour.

The North Korean nuclear threat is expected to dominate Donald Trump’s meetings in Japan and the next two stages of his tour, South Korea and China, where he will have a highly anticipated sit-down with Chinese President Xi Jinping.

The remainder of the tour will be more focused on economic issues, with Trump scheduled to take part in the APEC meeting in Da Nang and then in the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) Summit and the East Asia Summit in the Philippines.

Donald Trump’s first trip to Asia is the longest international tour by a US head of state since the one then-President George H.W. Bush embarked on in 1992.

Bush became ill at the end of that trip, famously vomiting on the Japanese prime minister’s lap at a formal dinner before fainting.(IANS)

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YouTube Kids launches its Newly Updated App Today

YouTube Kids launches its revamped app today.

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YouTube Logo
YouTube Logo. wikimedia commons
  • The company Launches its app on Friday.
  • The app enables you to make your child’s profile as per your selection of videos.

On its first anniversary in India, Youtube kids launches its app with new look and feature

Users can now create a profile for each kid and choose between younger or older content levels to manage the types of videos they can watch. Kid profiles work across all different devices.

“With improved connectivity and affordable data plans, we have seen enormous growth in creation and consumption of learning and educational content in the country, making India the fastest growing YouTube Kids country in Asia Pacific,” said Don Anderson, Head of Family and Learning Partnerships, YouTube APAC, in a statement.

With over 800 million learning video views per day, YouTube Kids is now live in 37 countries.

“Designed to put parents in control and appeal to kids in the age group of 2 to 10 years, the newly updated app comes with features that have been incorporated based on extensive research and inputs gathered from kids and parents,” the company said.(IANS)

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Is Longer Screen Time Bad for your Child’s Health? Experts say it might be time to relax the rules

Common Sense Media, a nonprofit group focused on kids’ use of media and technology, said in a report that kids ages 8 and younger average about 2 hours and 19 minutes with screens every day at home.

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New York, October 22, 2017 : Parents of small children have long been hearing about the perils of “screen time.” And with more screens, and new technologies such as Amazon’s Echo speaker, the message is getting louder.

And while plenty of parents are feeling guilty about it, some experts say it might be time to relax a little.

Go ahead and hand your kid a gadget now and then to cook dinner or get some work done. Not all kids can entertain themselves quietly, especially when they are young. Try that, and see how long it takes your toddler to start fishing a banana peel out of the overflowing trash can.

“I know I should limit my kid’s screen time a lot, but there is reality,” said Dorothy Jean Chang, who works for a tech company in New York and has a 2-year-old son. When she needs to work or finds her son awake too early, “it’s the best, easiest way to keep him occupied and quiet.”

Screen time, she says, “definitely happens more often than I like to admit.”

She’s not alone. Common Sense Media, a nonprofit group focused on kids’ use of media and technology, said in a report Thursday that kids ages 8 and younger average about 2 hours and 19 minutes with screens every day at home. That’s about the same as in 2011, though it’s up from an hour and a half in 2013, the last time the survey was conducted, when smartphones were not yet ubiquitous but TV watching was on the decline.

While the overall numbers have held steady in recent years, kids are shifting to mobile devices and other new technologies, just as their parents are. The survey found that kids spend an average of 48 minutes a day on mobile devices, up from 15 minutes in 2013. Kids are also getting exposed to voice-activated assistants, virtual reality and internet-connected toys, for which few guidelines exist because they are so new.

SCREEN TIME
Students play with their iPads at the Steve Jobs school, Aug. 21, 2013. The Steve Jobs schools in the Netherlands are founded by the Education For A New Time organization, which provides the children with iPads to help them learn with a more interactive experience. VOA

Mixed message

Some parents and experts worry that screens are taking time away from exercise and learning. But studies are inconclusive.

The economist Emily Oster said studies have found that kids who watch a lot of TV tend to be poorer, belong to minority groups and have parents with less education, all factors that contribute to higher levels of obesity and lower test scores. For that reason, it’s “difficult to draw strong conclusions about the effects of television from this research,” Oster wrote in 2015.

In fact, the Common Sense survey found that kids whose parents have higher incomes and education spend “substantially less time” with screens than other children. The gap was larger in 2017 than in previous years.

Rules relaxed

For more than a quarter century, the American Academy of Pediatrics held that kids under 2 should not be exposed to screens at all, and older kids should have strict limits. The rules have relaxed, such that video calls with grandma are OK, though “entertainment” television still isn’t. Even so, guidelines still feel out of touch for many parents who use screens of various sizes to preserve their sanity and get things done.

ALSO READ Few Tips For Parenting Boys, Which Will Make Them Kind And Gentle

Jen Bjorem, a pediatric speech pathologist in Leawood, Kansas, said that while it’s “quite unrealistic” for many families to totally do away with screen time, balance is key.

“Screen time can be a relief for many parents during times of high stress or just needing a break,” she said.

Moderation

Bjorem recommends using “visual schedules” that toddlers can understand to set limits. Instead of words, these schedules have images — dinner, bed time, reading or TV time, for example.

Another idea for toddlers? “Sensory bins,” or plastic tubs filled with beads, dry pasta and other stuff kids can play around with and, ideally, be just as absorbed as in mobile app or an episode of “Elmo.”

Of course, some kids will play with these carefully crafted, Pinterest-worthy bins for only a few minutes. Then they might start throwing beans and pasta all over your living room. So you clean up, put away the bins and turn on the TV.

In an interview, Oster said that while screen time “is probably not as good for your kid as high-quality engagement” with parents, such engagement is probably not something we can give our kids all the time anyway.

“Sometimes you just need them to watch a little bit of TV because you have to do something, or you need (it) to be a better parent,” Oster said. (VOA)