Tuesday February 19, 2019

For First Time in 130 Years, American Adults are Living more with their Parents than Partners in USA

White people, Black people, Asian/Pacific Islanders and Women with bachelor's degrees are still more likely to live with spouses or partners than with their mom and dad.

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32.1 percent of people live in their parents’ house, while 31.6 end up living with spouse or partner in their own homes and the rest live alone as single parent or in a home with renter/roommates.

According to a new analysis done by the Pew Research Center, after 130 years Americans aged between 18–34 are more likely to live with their parents than in other living situations.

“Alone/head of household” includes single parents and people who have roommates or renters living with them; “other” includes those living with family members (not parents), with non-family members or in group housing.

American People who come under the “other” includes those living with different family member (parents), or living in situation like group housing etc.  Single parents and people who have roommates or have renters living with them come under “alone/head of household”.

Pew also stated that this percentage is not a record high, for the people living with their parents as in 1940, 35 percent of people in the between that age group lived with their parents.

In those times living with your spouse or partner was a regular practice and popular. But today people prefer to live in alternate living situation, where they live either with mom or dad.

Men and women aged 18-34 in America have different allocation of time spent with parents. For instance men spend 35 percent of their time with parents, 28 percent with spouse or partner. But this is totally different in women’s case as they spend 35 percent of their time with their partner while 29 percent with parents.

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Unemployed man doing dishes at home

The study also says that less educated adults are the ones who are more likely to live with their parents than are their college-educated counterparts due their financial prospects in today’s economy.

Black and Hispanic people are in the same situation when compared with white people.

Black people have always lived their parents since 1980 and it won’t be hard for them to reach a new milestone in this category. Today 17 percent black millennials with their spouse or partner, while 36 percent live with their parents.

White people, Black people, Asian/Pacific Islanders and Women with bachelor’s degrees are still more likely to live with spouses or partners than with their mom and dad.

Pew says unemployment is on rise and especially for male since last 5 years and even those who have jobs are earning less and they become economically dependent on parents and start living with them. Since 1970, due to inflation wages have been continuously falling.

Past decade has also seen fewer marriages between young people. In general, the study actually show how much the situation and standards of 18-34 year-old have changed since 1880, when the data begin.

Once living alone as a single parent or with roommates was rare but today it has become choice and more than 14 percent people live that way.

As the time passed male prosperity increased and more and more started leaving until the wage drop in 60’s and 70 ‘s which cause many to stay with their father’s place.

Women who worked on the other lived with their parents than with partner or spouse. As married women are discouraged from working.

But things have completely changed now and many young women jobs and it’s the unemployed women who more likely to stay with parents. And yet, even as female prosperity rose, so did the number of young women living at home.

-by Bhaskar Raghavendran

Bhaskar is a graduate in Journalism and mass communication and a reporter at NewsGram. Twitter handle: bhaskar_ragha

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US Military Planes Deliver Aid to Venezuela-Colombia Border

The aid will be delivered to Cucuta, Colombia, where other food and medical supplies are being held.

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US, colombia, venezuela, military
FILE - Demonstrators who are against the Venezuelan government chant outside of the Organization of American States during the special meeting of the Permanent Council, in Washington, April 3, 2017, to consider the recent events in Venezuela. VOA

More than 200 tons of US humanitarian aid intended for Venezuela is scheduled to begin arriving just across the border in Colombia Saturday, delivered by US military cargo planes.

The aid will be delivered to Cucuta, Colombia, where other food and medical supplies are being held.

The aid comes at the request of Venezuelan opposition leader Juan Guaido to ease shortages of food and other essentials in economically troubled Venezuela.

Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro has said the aid is part of Washington’s political maneuvering to get him out of office, and he has blocked off a bridge needed to bring the supplies into Venezuela.

The United States said Maduro’s election was unfair and illegitimate, and U.S. officials and scores of other nations have recognized his rival, Guaido, as the country’s interim leader.

US, Colombia, Venezuela
Sacks containing humanitarian aid are pictured at a warehouse near the Tienditas cross-border bridge between Colombia and Venezuela in Cucuta, Colombia, Feb. 14, 2019. VOA

Adding pressure

On Friday, Washington added to the political pressure on Maduro by sanctioning the head of Venezuela’s oil company as well as top intelligence officials.

Earlier Friday, Guiado’s representatives collected aid pledges from many nations at a meeting of the Organization of American States in Washington, where 25 countries promised more than $100 million in humanitarian aid to Venezuela.

“We came to ask for the solidarity of the governments of the world,” said Lester Toledo, coordinator for international help for Venezuela. “We appreciate the diplomatic gestures. We appreciate the letters and the recognition of President Guaidó. But we ask for help, to make the humanitarian aid a reality. That all donations can let us purchase medical supplies that we really need.”

Venezuela, US, Colombia
If the aid does arrive in Venezuela, organizations like the Red Cross will help distribute the supplies with “neutral and independent” conditions, Mario Villarroel, president of Venezuela’s Red Cross, said. Pixabay

Distributing the aid

U.S. Ambassador to the Organization of American States Carlos Trujillo said Guaidó has a plan.

“I believe that President Guaidó has done everything possible to make Maduro accept the humanitarian aid. Maduro has no argument, the person sitting in power doesn’t let the humanitarian aid reach his people who are dying of hunger,” Trujillo said.

Guaido said the aid will be brought into Venezuela Feb. 23.

Maduro, however, said the aid will not be brought into his nation, and he blames U.S. economic sanctions for Venezuela’s problems.

ALSO READ: White House in Support of Trump’s National Emergency Declaration

“They’re putting pressure on Venezuela’s banks, which are in charge of purchasing and bringing the food and supplies. The White House is pressuring so that none of our bank accounts work. They have frozen billions of dollars that could otherwise buy food and medicine,” he claimed.

If the aid does arrive in Venezuela, organizations like the Red Cross will help distribute the supplies with “neutral and independent” conditions, Mario Villarroel, president of Venezuela’s Red Cross, said.

“We have the necessary experience, we know it is a very complex issue, but we will do our best to coordinate the distribution and organization of this humanitarian aid,” he said. (VOA)