Sunday January 21, 2018

For First Time in 130 Years, American Adults are Living more with their Parents than Partners in USA

White people, Black people, Asian/Pacific Islanders and Women with bachelor's degrees are still more likely to live with spouses or partners than with their mom and dad.

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32.1 percent of people live in their parents’ house, while 31.6 end up living with spouse or partner in their own homes and the rest live alone as single parent or in a home with renter/roommates.

According to a new analysis done by the Pew Research Center, after 130 years Americans aged between 18–34 are more likely to live with their parents than in other living situations.

“Alone/head of household” includes single parents and people who have roommates or renters living with them; “other” includes those living with family members (not parents), with non-family members or in group housing.

American People who come under the “other” includes those living with different family member (parents), or living in situation like group housing etc.  Single parents and people who have roommates or have renters living with them come under “alone/head of household”.

Pew also stated that this percentage is not a record high, for the people living with their parents as in 1940, 35 percent of people in the between that age group lived with their parents.

In those times living with your spouse or partner was a regular practice and popular. But today people prefer to live in alternate living situation, where they live either with mom or dad.

Men and women aged 18-34 in America have different allocation of time spent with parents. For instance men spend 35 percent of their time with parents, 28 percent with spouse or partner. But this is totally different in women’s case as they spend 35 percent of their time with their partner while 29 percent with parents.

Man_washing_dishes
Unemployed man doing dishes at home

The study also says that less educated adults are the ones who are more likely to live with their parents than are their college-educated counterparts due their financial prospects in today’s economy.

Black and Hispanic people are in the same situation when compared with white people.

Black people have always lived their parents since 1980 and it won’t be hard for them to reach a new milestone in this category. Today 17 percent black millennials with their spouse or partner, while 36 percent live with their parents.

White people, Black people, Asian/Pacific Islanders and Women with bachelor’s degrees are still more likely to live with spouses or partners than with their mom and dad.

Pew says unemployment is on rise and especially for male since last 5 years and even those who have jobs are earning less and they become economically dependent on parents and start living with them. Since 1970, due to inflation wages have been continuously falling.

Past decade has also seen fewer marriages between young people. In general, the study actually show how much the situation and standards of 18-34 year-old have changed since 1880, when the data begin.

Once living alone as a single parent or with roommates was rare but today it has become choice and more than 14 percent people live that way.

As the time passed male prosperity increased and more and more started leaving until the wage drop in 60’s and 70 ‘s which cause many to stay with their father’s place.

Women who worked on the other lived with their parents than with partner or spouse. As married women are discouraged from working.

But things have completely changed now and many young women jobs and it’s the unemployed women who more likely to stay with parents. And yet, even as female prosperity rose, so did the number of young women living at home.

-by Bhaskar Raghavendran

Bhaskar is a graduate in Journalism and mass communication and a reporter at NewsGram. Twitter handle: bhaskar_ragha

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How sexual violence in neighbourhood affects your health

Researchers conducted interviews with nearly 350 adults in nine neighbourhoods in a major American city with high rates of poverty, unemployment and crime

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Sexual violence in neighborhood can affect the mental health of women. Pexels
Sexual violence in neighborhood can affect the mental health of women. Pexels
  • Sexual violence in the neighbourhood can harm your health.
  • Neighbourhood plays a vital role in human behaviour.
  • Men can be more aware of what makes women feel insecure.

A study finds sexual violence in the neighbourhood can harm the physical and mental health of women. Neighbourhoods play a key role in the behaviour and development of people, previous studies show and some conditions — such as crime, segregation, poverty and disorder — can have harmful effects on health.

Researchers conducted interviews with nearly 350 adults in nine neighbourhoods in a major American city with high rates of poverty, unemployment and crime.

“Feeling unsafe, especially in and around your home, can erode physical and mental health,” said Dana M. Prince, co-author of the study and assistant professor at the Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences at Case Western Reserve University.

Researchers say men can be more aware of what makes women feel insecure. Pexels
Researchers say men can be more aware of what makes women feel insecure. Pexels

According to the researchers, feelings about the frequency of rape or other forms of sexual assault in a neighbourhood are significantly tied to women’s perceptions of its safety.

“Our results could mean men are less aware of sexual violence, or perhaps they do not feel comfortable reporting that it makes them feel less safe — perhaps both — while women tend to be socialised early on to be aware of the possibility of sexual attack,” Prince added.

Participants were asked how often particular crimes occurred in their neighbourhood in the past six months.

“Our results indicate that men can become more aware of how women feel about what contributes to and threaten their safety,” the researcher said.

The study was published in the Journal of Community Psychology. (IANS)