Wednesday June 19, 2019

For First Time in 130 Years, American Adults are Living more with their Parents than Partners in USA

White people, Black people, Asian/Pacific Islanders and Women with bachelor's degrees are still more likely to live with spouses or partners than with their mom and dad.

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32.1 percent of people live in their parents’ house, while 31.6 end up living with spouse or partner in their own homes and the rest live alone as single parent or in a home with renter/roommates.

According to a new analysis done by the Pew Research Center, after 130 years Americans aged between 18–34 are more likely to live with their parents than in other living situations.

“Alone/head of household” includes single parents and people who have roommates or renters living with them; “other” includes those living with family members (not parents), with non-family members or in group housing.

American People who come under the “other” includes those living with different family member (parents), or living in situation like group housing etc.  Single parents and people who have roommates or have renters living with them come under “alone/head of household”.

Pew also stated that this percentage is not a record high, for the people living with their parents as in 1940, 35 percent of people in the between that age group lived with their parents.

In those times living with your spouse or partner was a regular practice and popular. But today people prefer to live in alternate living situation, where they live either with mom or dad.

Men and women aged 18-34 in America have different allocation of time spent with parents. For instance men spend 35 percent of their time with parents, 28 percent with spouse or partner. But this is totally different in women’s case as they spend 35 percent of their time with their partner while 29 percent with parents.

Man_washing_dishes
Unemployed man doing dishes at home

The study also says that less educated adults are the ones who are more likely to live with their parents than are their college-educated counterparts due their financial prospects in today’s economy.

Black and Hispanic people are in the same situation when compared with white people.

Black people have always lived their parents since 1980 and it won’t be hard for them to reach a new milestone in this category. Today 17 percent black millennials with their spouse or partner, while 36 percent live with their parents.

White people, Black people, Asian/Pacific Islanders and Women with bachelor’s degrees are still more likely to live with spouses or partners than with their mom and dad.

Pew says unemployment is on rise and especially for male since last 5 years and even those who have jobs are earning less and they become economically dependent on parents and start living with them. Since 1970, due to inflation wages have been continuously falling.

Past decade has also seen fewer marriages between young people. In general, the study actually show how much the situation and standards of 18-34 year-old have changed since 1880, when the data begin.

Once living alone as a single parent or with roommates was rare but today it has become choice and more than 14 percent people live that way.

As the time passed male prosperity increased and more and more started leaving until the wage drop in 60’s and 70 ‘s which cause many to stay with their father’s place.

Women who worked on the other lived with their parents than with partner or spouse. As married women are discouraged from working.

But things have completely changed now and many young women jobs and it’s the unemployed women who more likely to stay with parents. And yet, even as female prosperity rose, so did the number of young women living at home.

-by Bhaskar Raghavendran

Bhaskar is a graduate in Journalism and mass communication and a reporter at NewsGram. Twitter handle: bhaskar_ragha

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US Preschoolers on Government Food Aid Grown Less Pudgy: Study

Obesity rates dropped steadily to about 14% in 2016

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US, Preschoolers, Government
A photo shows a closeup of a beam scale in a Federal building in Washington, D.C., June 18, 2019. (Photo: Diaa Bekheet). Preschoolers on government food aid have grown a little less pudgy, a U.S. study found. A photo shows a closeup of a beam scale in a Federal building in Washington, D.C., June 18, 2019. (Photo: Diaa Bekheet). VOA

Preschoolers on government food aid have grown a little less pudgy, a U.S. study found, offering fresh evidence that previous signs of declining obesity rates weren’t a fluke.

Obesity rates dropped steadily to about 14% in 2016 — the latest data available — from 16% in 2010, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported.

“It gives us more hope that this is a real change,” said Heidi Blanck, who heads obesity prevention at the CDC.

The results were published Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

US, Preschoolers, Government
Preschoolers on government food aid have grown a little less pudgy. VOA

The improvement affected youngsters ages 2 through 4 who receive food vouchers and other services in the federal Women, Infants and Children nutrition program. About 1 in 5 U.S. kids that age were enrolled in 2016.

An earlier report involving program participants the same age found at least small declines in obesity in 18 states between 2008 and 2011. That was the first decline after years of increases that later plateaued, and researchers weren’t sure if it was just a blip.

Improvements in food options in that program including adding more fruits, vegetables and whole grains may have contributed to the back-to-back obesity declines, researchers said. Other data show obesity rates in 2016 were stable but similar, about 14 percent, for children aged 2 to 5 who were not enrolled in the program, Blanck noted.

While too many U.S. children are still too heavy, the findings should be celebrated, said Dr. William Dietz, a former CDC obesity expert. “The changes are meaningful and substantial.”

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Dietz said program changes that cut the amount of juice allowed and switched from high-fat to low-fat milk likely had the biggest impact. He estimated that amounted to an average of 9,000 fewer monthly calories per child.

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends low-fat milk for children. It also suggests kids should limit juice intake and choose fresh fruits instead.

Further reducing U.S. childhood obesity will require broader changes — such as encouraging families and day care centers to routinely serve fruits, vegetables and whole grains; and employers to extend parental leave to make breastfeeding easier for new mothers, said Maureen Black, a child development and nutrition specialist at the University of Maryland.

Studies have shown breastfed infants are less likely than others to become obese later on. (VOA)