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India is on the verge of losing about 300 Languages out of 800: Find out Why!

A report by Bhasha Research Centre states that around 197 languages have been extinct while 42 are critically endangered

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Endangered languages in India. Image Source: LokSabha
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  • India has the distinction of accommodating 800 languages and dialects across the country
  • The UN Educational Scientific and Cultural Organisation found that 197 languages in India are endangered while 42 languages are critically endangered
  • Prof. K. Shrikumar of Lucknow University has taken the initiative to prepare a documentary on Jad language of Uttarakhand 

Language forms an integral part of one’s culture. India has the distinction of accommodating 800 languages and dialects across the country, according to a research conducted by Bhasha Research Centre. Bhasha Research Centre is an NGO founded under the leadership of Dr G.N. Devy, winner of Sahitya Academy Award.

Dr S Radhakrishnan. Image Source: Wikimedia Commons
Dr S Radhakrishnan. Image Source: Wikimedia Commons

The report of the survey was published on 5th September on the 125th Birth Anniversary of Dr S. Radhakrishnan. The report consists of 35000 pages and was published in 5 volumes. The survey began in 2010 and lasted for 4 years. The research was done by many known historians and research scholars.

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The report suggested that around 300 languages have been extinct till now. And 150 more languages will extinct in the coming half century. A linguistic scholar George Grierson founded that there were 364 languages between 1894 to 1928.

The UN Educational Scientific and Cultural Organisation is also counting the same, in which they found that 197 languages in India are endangered while 42 languages came under the category of critically endangered. Nihali, a language from pre-Aryan and pre- Munda reign, was also included in the list.

UN Educational Scientific and Cultural Organisation. Image Source: www.mid-day.com
UN Educational Scientific and Cultural Organisation. Image Source: www.mid-day.com

The research found that the main cause of the extinction is that the speaking community has died and children are not interested to learn their mother-tongue and therefore are not able to carry it.

Researchers believe that languages are the product of a culture which helps them to trace the culture of a country and the country who has suffered the extinction of language has witnessed the extinction of the primitive culture.

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Another language which is spoken on the Maharashtra-Madhya Pradesh border by around 2500 villagers is on the verge of extinction. The reason is that they are migrating to other cities in search of work.

Tribals of Chattisgarh. Image Source: www.chhattisgarhonline.in
Tribals of Chattisgarh. Image Source: www.chhattisgarhonline.in

Prof. K. Shrikumar of Lucknow University has taken the initiative to prepare a documentary on Jad language of Uttarakhand with less than 2000 speakers. Similarly, Professor Anvita Abbi has taken the initiative to record the oral tribal languages in Chattisgarh (Todi) and Tamil Nadu.

-prepared by Aparna Gupta, an intern with NewsGram. Twitter @writetoaparna99

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  • Aparna Gupta

    Languages are the integral part of India. to preserve our culture we need to practice our regional languages instead of English.

  • Vrushali Mahajan

    Indian culture is supposed to be one of the best cultures and languages have been a major part of the culture. There should be something done to save these languages.

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  • Aparna Gupta

    Languages are the integral part of India. to preserve our culture we need to practice our regional languages instead of English.

  • Vrushali Mahajan

    Indian culture is supposed to be one of the best cultures and languages have been a major part of the culture. There should be something done to save these languages.

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President Ram Nath Kovind Pays His Condolences to Former UN Chief Kofi Annan

Annan was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize jointly with the UN in 2001 "for their work for a better organised and more peaceful world".

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India condoles former UN chief Kofi Annan's death.
India condoles former UN chief Kofi Annan's death. Flickr

India on Saturday condoled the death of former UN Secretary General and Nobel laureate Kofi Annan with President Ram Nath Kovind expressing his condolences to the former Ghanaian diplomat’s family and the UN community as a whole.

“Sorry to learn of the passing of former Secretary General of the United Nations Kofi Annan,” Kovind said on the Rashtrapati Bhavan Twitter handle.

“My condolences to his family and to the UN community,” he stated.

Annan, 80, died on Saturday in Switzerland after a short illness, with his wife and three children by his side.

“It is with immense sadness that the Annan family and the Kofi Annan Foundation announce that the former Secretary General of the UN and Nobel Peace Laureate, passed away peacefully on Saturday 18th August after a short illness,” his family said.

Kofi Annan
Annan was the first black African to take up the role of the world’s top diplomat, serving two terms from 1997 to 2006. Flickr

Annan was the first black African to take up the role of the world’s top diplomat, serving two terms from 1997 to 2006. He later served as the UN special envoy for Syria, leading efforts to find a peaceful solution to the conflict.

He also led a UN commission to investigate the Rohingya refugee crisis in Myanmar.

The Myanmar government led by Aung San Suu Kyi supported Annan’s recommendations on the crisis in the country’s Rakhine State.

Also Read: New AI Model to Identify the Risk of Heart Disease in Indians

Annan was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize jointly with the UN in 2001 “for their work for a better organised and more peaceful world”.

His tenure as the UN chief coincided with the Iraq war and the HIV/Aids pandemic. (IANS)