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Indian teen to be reunited with father, was stranded in Bahrain for 9 years

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airportAn Indian teenager who remained stranded in Bahrain since 2006 is to be reunited with his father in India on Friday.

Due to lack of legal documents and identity papers, Raja Prasad, 18, was stranded in Bahrain in 2006 when his father Thani Prasad was deported back to India, Gulf Daily News reported.

Born out of wedlock to a Sri Lankan mother, who left his father when he was two years old, Raja did not have any legal documents or an official birth certificate, delaying his extradition from the country.

Raja’s father, from Hardoi in Uttar Pradesh, lived in Bahrain for 16 years as a laundry worker. Surviving with help from the Migrant Workers Protection Society, Raja was able to continue his studies in Bahrain. “Different people at different points of time in all these years helped Raja by financially supporting him and looking after his well-being,” said social worker Mehru Vesuvala.

He is now going home after receiving an outpass from the Indian Embassy. Indian Embassy officials said his plane ticket had been purchased with aid from the Indian Community Welfare Fund (ICWF). The ICWF was established by the ministry of overseas Indian affairs in 43 countries which have a large Indian population. It provides on-site welfare services.

– (IANS)

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Having kids or not, life satisfaction remain same

Parents with or without children are just two sides of the same coin: non-parents are not 'failed' parents and parents are not 'failed' non-parents, says a study

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Having or not having kids doesn't affect life satisfaction. VOA

Parents with or without children are just two sides of the same coin: non-parents are not ‘failed’ parents and parents are not ‘failed’ non-parents, says a study.

According to researchers, factors such as higher educational attainment, higher income, better health and religiosity enhance life satisfaction and they found that parents and non-parents have similar levels of life satisfaction.

“It is simply a mistake to presume that people with children have better lives,” said Angus Deaton, the Dwight D. Eisenhower professor of economics and international affairs at Princeton University.

Having kids doesn’t increase life satisfaction. Twitter

“Some people like oranges, and some like apples, and we do not think that orange eaters should have better or worse lives than apple eaters,” he added.

However, adults with children at home experience more emotional highs and lows than those without children at home, said the study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Researchers examined data from the Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index – a survey of 1.8 million Americans who evaluated their lives and reported daily emotional experiences between 2008 and 2012. The researchers focused on the 34-46 age group.

They found that all emotions – happiness, smile, enjoyment, worry, stress and anger – were markedly higher among those who have children at home. “Life evaluation is not the same as experienced emotions, such as happiness, enjoyment, sadness, worry or stress,” said Deaton.

Also Read: New Toys Help Cultivate Emotional Intelligence in Children

“The results show that, no matter what else is taken into account, parents experience more of all of these than non-parents. There are good days and bad, ups and downs,” he added.

For countries like India, where there is strong social pressure to become parents, Deaton and Stone say their argument does not apply. In such countries, people may have children even when it does not increase their own life evaluation, though it may increase that of their parents or communities, said the study. “The evidence for those countries does indeed show that parents have lower life evaluations, on average,” the study said. IANS

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