Thursday April 25, 2019

June 2 is National Doughnut (Donut) Day: Here is why it is of Significance to Americans!

America loves its doughnuts. On National Doughnut Day, we bring you ten facts you might not know

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June 2 is National Doughnut (Donut) Day, at Donut Street. Pixabay

June 02, 2017: 

If you have a sweet tooth, then today is certainly your day! On this day, the first Friday of June which the Americans celebrate as the National Doughnut (or Donut) Day. It is to celebrate and honor the Salvation Army Lassies.

The origin of this occasion can be traced back to the year 1938 in Chicago when the Army celebrated doughnut day to honor the women who served doughnuts to tired and hungry American soldiers during the World War 1.

The doughnut has been popularized in America. Over 10 billion doughnuts are made in the US each year! The global audience sees it most of the times in pop culture. The police head in The Simpsons has a few doughnuts piled on his gun all the time. It is portrayed as police force’s favorite snack with a coffee.

NewsGram brings to you current foreign news from all over the world.

Here are ten things you may not know about doughnuts:

  • They were called ‘olykoeks’ when they first came to America. Olykoek is a Dutch word for ‘Oily Cakes’. Crazy right?
  • Did you notice the two different spellings in the title? Well, both are acceptable. Originally spelled doughnuts, the shorter and convenient form ‘donut’ was popularized by the opening of ‘Dunkin Donuts’ in the 20th Century.
American Doughnut. Pixabay

 

  • There are different stories to the starting of the relationship between a cop and a doughnut. The most common story is that doughnut shops were open till late at night and provided for an accessible snack for the cops on night shifts. Gradually, a reciprocal relationship emerged. Doughnut shops would welcome the police.
  • Doughnuts were declared ‘the hit food of the century of progress’ at a 1933 Chicago world fair.
  • It was Captain Hensen Gregory who claims to have invented the whole in the doughnuts. His mother Elizabeth Gregory made doughnuts that did not have a hole.
  • Red Cross during the World War 2 would provide doughnuts and coffee to American and British soldiers. While it was free for Americans, the British had to pay. This led to a conflict between the soldiers and Red Cross had to ultimately charge everyone.
  • The Vietnamese in 1966 had an argument with Marine Capt. Orson Swindlen regarding the absence of holidays in the US. The marine responded that US has a National Donut Day on November 10. The American soldiers held captive were served doughnuts on November 10. It was actually the Marine’s birth date.
  • The doughnut industry in the US is worth 3.6 billion dollars.
Doughnut and Coffee. Pixabay
  • The first doughnut machine was invented in 1920 by Adolph Levitt who was a Russian-born immigrant in the US.
  • The Guinness World Record for most doughnuts eaten in three minutes without licking lips was by an American Patrick Bertoletti who ate 3 doughnuts.

Money can’t buy happiness, or so it seems today- rush to the places in the US giving away free doughnuts and kick start your weekend with what happiness tastes like!

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  • vedika kakar

    Have any of you tried rainbow or unicorn or galaxy doughnuts???

Next Story

Hindu Icons Which Have Spiritual Significance

These icons have to be treated with extreme respect and should not be touched or removed without the owners consent.

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rangoli
Rangoli, Toran, Aum and Swastika – optional display inside or outside the home. Pixabay

Hindu Council of Australia has compiled a list of Hindu Icons that Hindus may wear on their body and which have spiritual significance. This list has been made to remove confusion among non-Hindus about what is sacred to Hindus.

Hindu Sacraments worn on the body

Hindu icons all year round

bangles
Bangles worn on wrists by women – a cultural item. Pixabay

Scared Hindu icons that can not be removed

  1. Nose stud – essential for girls during puberty, can not be removed for one year.
  2. Yajnopavit/Janaue – essential for boys after their Yajnopavit right of passage, once worn can not be removed and worn again without extensive rituals (not even during swimming lessons)
  3. Sindoor/Mangalsutra – essential for married women. Removal is not permitted while husband is alive.
  4. Choti/Shikha – small hair tail for boys during a right of passage.
  5. Pagdi (Turban, A cloth wrapped around the head) – touching or removing it is disrespectful. It can be removed for a short period in privacy, like when having a shower and must be worn as soon as possible.
  6. Sivalingam (Veera and Adi Shiva people, Lingayat) or other Hindu Gods as pendant in a necklace.

Sacred Hindu icons that can be removed by the wearer

  1. Bindi – optional for women and girls, it can not be removed by others.
  2. Bangles worn on wrists by women – a cultural item
  3. Kondhani – a bracelet made of black thread worn around the waist
  4. Anklets (Pahjeb, Payal) – a metal bracelet worn on ankles
  5. Ear rings/studs for boys and girls in some families
  6. Gem stone on rings for special effects of planets
  7. Hindu Sacraments worn on Special Occasions

    Anklets (Pahjeb, Payal) – a metal bracelet worn on ankles
    Anklets (Pahjeb, Payal) – a metal bracelet worn on ankles. Pixabay
  1. Tulsi Mala – A necklace of Tulsi beads. During special religious observations.
  2. Teeka, Tilak, Vibhuti – essential during Hindu prayers, optional otherwise
  3. Mehendi/henna/turmeric – essential when getting married or when a close family member gets married, optional for married women during karva chauth day. Henna is a fast colour (looks like a emporary tatto) that takes a week or more to fade away
  4. Men are not allowed to cut their hair during Sabramalai month (Mid of November to January 14/15)
  5. Rakhi – a special bracelet worn on special festival day of Rakhi.
  6. Kajal/Surma (dark black eye ointment)
  7. Raksha/mouli – multi colour thread bracelet as a protective icon during special days
  8. Gajra – a flower arrangement by woman at the back of there hair.

Hindu icons in a Hindu home

These icons have to be treated with extreme respect and should not be touched or removed without the owners consent.

  1. Rangoli, Toran, Aum and Swastika – optional display inside or outside the home.
  2. Home shrine

(Originally Published: Hindu Council of Australia)