The Art of Headlines: Start your article with a bang!

The essence of an article lies in its headline, and it is a daunting task to grab the right one from a flux of ideas. Therefore, it is important to come up with the right type of headline before starting an article. Here are 8 types of headline ideas you may want to check out!
Art of writing Headlines. (Aaron Burden- Unsplash)

Art of writing Headlines. (Aaron Burden- Unsplash)

Headline

Indirect Headline:

As the name goes, an indirect headline does not take a direct approach. Instead, the essence of an indirect headline lies in its subtlety. The main purpose of an indirect headline is to generate interest in readers thus making the news article more clickable. For example-

<div class="paragraphs"><p>Art of writing Headlines. (Aaron Burden- Unsplash)</p></div>
No Country For Dalits? Youth thrashed by 'upper castes' for touching food at a wedding

Even though the headline above reveals its intention, the starting question 'No Country For Dalits?' raises a more general and over-arching issue of atrocities against a certain section of our society and thus points out indirectly towards a specific topic within the general discourse.

Direct Headline

As the name goes, a 'direct headline' is an antithesis of an 'indirect headline'. Quite opposite to the subtlety of the latter, the former is direct in its approach. For example-

<div class="paragraphs"><p>Art of writing Headlines. (Aaron Burden- Unsplash)</p></div>
Top 10 Office design ideas which emerged in 2022

The readers before clicking on the link above are fully aware of what they are looking for in the article. There are no fancy over-arching and generic phrases to generate curiosity but to-the-point facts.

How-to-do-it Headline

These types of headlines are 'direct headlines' which target readers looking out for solutions concerning a particular problem. Mostly, these types of headlines start with a 'how to' phrase and contain step-by-step methods to achieve the goal of the reader in understanding a particular topic. For example-

<div class="paragraphs"><p>Art of writing Headlines. (Aaron Burden- Unsplash)</p></div>
How to Earn Cryptocurrency on WhiteBIT?

In all the headlines above, the content covers diverse topics related to cryptocurrency, love-Jihad, blood sugar levels, and car renting.

Despite the diversity and unrelatedness of the topics with each other, the 'How' factor remains common in all.

Question Headline

These types of headlines (as the name goes) generate a sense of curiosity among readers with the question they pose. Furthermore, the answer to the problem in the headline is provided in the article itself.

<div class="paragraphs"><p>Art of writing Headlines. (Aaron Burden- Unsplash)</p></div>
Did You Ever Wonder What Makes A Society Happy?

In both the headlines above, a question is put up by the writers. However, the first article appears to be more successful in posing a question to a wider range of readers due to its abstract and generic topic. The second headline is related to a more specific event and a subgroup of readers. Also, its readability is not time specific, unlike the first headline which may garner readers in the future.

Emotional Headline

An 'emotional headline' intends to generate a strong sense of emotion among the readers. This type of headline may be 'positive' or 'negative' in its approach.

<div class="paragraphs"><p>Art of writing Headlines. (Aaron Burden- Unsplash)</p></div>
Diwali 2022: Celebrate the 'festival of lights' in the most traditional backdrop

Now, in both headlines, there is an emotional appeal to the readers. In the first headline a sense of 'positivity' is generated concerning the tradition of a specific festival of a specific culture and country. The second headline on the other hand is unclear in its agenda. It appears to be related to world politics and thus targets a completely different set of people.

Therefore, the emotional quotient of a headline may not be relatable to all.

News Headline

These types of headlines are mostly related to breaking news and do not have an extensive shelf life. However, they are important in making the readers aware of the recent happenings around the world.

For example-

<div class="paragraphs"><p>Art of writing Headlines. (Aaron Burden- Unsplash)</p></div>
Moscow to Goa flight diverted over bomb threat

This news was published on the 10th of January, 2023, and gives the readers specific and to-the-point information about a certain event that took place on that particular day or the day before. This type of headline is explosive and loses its intensity with time if the related matter cannot generate more headlines with each passing day.

Two-part headline

This type of headline combines two ideas with the help of punctuation. It is not that the headlines are not self-sufficient but a combination of both brings out a more unique output which helps capture the attention of the readers.

<div class="paragraphs"><p>Art of writing Headlines. (Aaron Burden- Unsplash)</p></div>
Russia-Ukraine War: Russian missile hits the market in Kharkiv

In the news headline above, the part before the colon describes the overall topic of an ongoing newsworthy event. On the other hand, the part after the colon corresponds to a specific event that happened within the larger event. Both parts of the headline combine to form a general and specific picture of the event the article wants to convey.

Scientific Headline

This type of headline usually points toward an article backed by solid scientific study and research. This makes the article more authentic and believable to the reader.

<div class="paragraphs"><p>Art of writing Headlines. (Aaron Burden- Unsplash)</p></div>
Scientists Reveal Severe Covid-19 Triggered Natural Brain Ageing

However, that does not mean that the article itself is authentic. If the headline is authentic then the article needs to further the authenticity by providing proper citations and sources to justify its claims. For example- In recent times, the Indian internet got flooded with bizarre claims which said how NASA had discovered 'scientific' aspects of certain religious beliefs.

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