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Most Indian firms see Employee experience as a critical aspect of achieving their Business Objectives: Study

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Employees in an office (representational image), Pixabay
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New Delhi, April 27, 2017: Almost 43 percent of business and IT leaders in India — higher than the average 38 percent for Asia-Pacific and Japan — see employee experience as a critical aspect of achieving their business objectives, a new study said on Thursday.

According to the study, conducted by Forrester Consulting on behalf of Dell, Indian firms realise the value of technology and innovation and the importance of constantly improving customer experience better than other developing countries in the region.

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This puts India in a unique position in Asia-Pacific and Japan (APJ), where collectively only six in 10 (61 per cent) business leaders felt that existing technology in their organisation is sufficient to meet their business goals.

“To establish a balance, IT and business leaders need to embark upon a workforce transformation strategy and provide employees, appropriate end user technology — the requisite devices and software — in order to attain the two-fold objective of increasing employee efficiency, as well as retaining talent,” Indrajit Belgundi, Director and General Manager, Client Solutions Group, Dell India, said in a statement.

The study also found that most security breaches that have occurred in the past 12 months are because of vulnerabilities at the device level.

Nearly 43 per cent of breaches in India occurred due to lost/stolen assets by an employee, while 39 per cent occurred due to a security breach of an employee device. (IANS)

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Older Employees Are More Likely to Get Affected by Unfair Treatment at Workplace

Older employees tend to feel more stressed than younger employees when their employers don't provide them with the support and resources they need to do their jobs well, according to a new study

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The researchers found that greater symptoms of depression were linked to worse episodic memory -- a person's ability to remember specific experiences and events.
representational image. pixabay

Older employees tend to feel more stressed than younger employees when their employers don’t provide them with the support and resources they need to do their jobs well, according to a new study.

The study, published in the “Journal of Vocational Behavior”, found that both younger and older workers had lower levels of overall stress when they were given more autonomy on the job, had good relationships with their bosses and felt they were respected and treated fairly at work.

But when such resources were lacking, older workers reported significantly higher stress levels a year later than their younger colleagues, the researcher said.

“With the workforce becoming more age-diverse and older at the same time, it is important to understand the differences between younger and older workers to help them cope with the demands of their work lives more effectively,” said co-author Lale Yaldiz from the Portland State University in the US.

Older employees tend to feel more stressed than younger employees when their employers don't provide them with the support and resources they need to do their jobs well, according to a new study
Employees in an office (representational image), Pixabay

For the study, the researchers surveyed 243 municipal public works employees between the ages of 24 and 64 over the course of a year.

The findings suggest that older workers place a greater value on having autonomy and a supportive work environment than younger workers because those resources allow them to adapt to the psychological and physical changes that come with aging.

For example, older workers tend to prioritise emotional needs and care more about having socially meaningful interactions and mentoring their colleagues than younger workers whose focus tends to be on gaining the skills they need to advance in their careers, the researcher said.

Also Read: New Study Shows That Elderly With Symptoms of Depression Are More Prone to Memory Problems

Since older workers appear to be more susceptible to stress in the face of unfairness, organisations can help workers by being transparent about how decisions are made and implemented, not discriminating, valuing employee input when making key decisions and providing channels for employees to voice concerns, the researchers added. (IANS)