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Nice (France) Terrorism Attack: the Hero who got onto the truck and battled with the terrorist before police arrived

A heroic member of the public halted the truck by leaping into the vehicle, wrestling with the driver and seizing his revolver

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French CRS and judicial police work near the heavy truck that ran into a crowd at high speed celebrating the Bastille Day July 14 national holiday on the Promenade des Anglais killing 80 people in Nice, France, July 15, 2016. REUTERS/Eric Gaillard
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  • Nice, France Terror Attack: The truck charged for hundreds of meters along the front facing the Baie des Anges (Bay of Angels), slamming into hundreds of people
  • A heroic member of the public halted the truck by leaping into the vehicle, wrestling with the driver and seizing his revolver
  • The driver was then shot dead by two officers

A heroic member of the public halted the truck involved in the Nice terror attack which left 84 dead— by leaping into the vehicle, wrestling with the driver and seizing his revolver, giving the police time to arrive at the spot and shoot the driver dead, a media report said.

The Independent quoted police sources in Nice as confirming that the murderous two kilometre charge of the lorry, driven by Mohamed Lahouaiej Bouhlel, 31, might have been even longer if it had not been for the courage of a member of the public.

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The man had hurled himself into the cab when the 20 tonne truck was held up by an obstruction. He wrestled with the driver, who seized a revolver and fired several shots at the man and at police officers who arrived on the scene. None was hurt. The driver was then shot dead by two officers, the police said.

Terror Attack in Europe Image Source: rferl.org
Terror Attack in Europe Image Source: rferl.org

An eyewitness, Eric Ciotti, told the media that as people tried to flee from the truck, someone jumped in and was able to help the police kill the man. ”A person jumped on to the truck to try to stop it,” Ciotti said. ”It’s at that moment that the police were able to neutralise this terrorist. I won’t forget the look of this policewoman who intercepted the killer,” he added.

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Another eyewitness, Nader El Shafei said: “I kept yelling at him, waving with my hands to stop and trying to tell him that there is a lot people under his truck – dead already. But he did not give any attention to anyone outside the truck.” ”And suddenly I saw him picking up something like a cellphone. I thought he would call the ambulance for the accident but it seemed that I was wrong, because he just picked up his gun and he started to shoot the police,” El Shafei added.

“Just when the police arrived they just felt something was wrong so they kept yelling at him and when he did not step out – they saw him from the window taking his gun out,” he said. ”They knew that would be a gun shooting so they just killed him right away – they did not wait to negotiate or something, they just opened fire on him,” he added.(IANS)

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Facebook Allows French Regulars To Oversee Hate Speech Control

France's use of embedded regulators is modeled on what happens in its banking and nuclear industries.

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Facebook, India, Fake News, Hate Speech, Russia, digital
A Facebook panel is seen during the Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity, in Cannes, France. VOA

Facebook will allow French regulators to “embed” inside the company to examine how it combats online hate speech, the first time the wary tech giant has opened its doors in such a way, President Emmanuel Macron said Monday.

From January, Macron’s administration will send a small team of senior civil servants to the company for six months to verify Facebook’s goodwill and determine whether its checks on racist, sexist or hate-fueled speech could be improved.

“It’s a first,” Macron told the annual Internet Governance Forum in Paris. “I’m delighted by this very innovative experimental approach,” he said. “It’s an experiment, but a very important first step in my view.”

The trial project is an example of what Macron has called “smart regulation,” something he wants to extend to other tech leaders such as Google, Apple and Amazon.

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Facebook’s founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg meets with French President Emmanuel Macron at the Elysee Palace after the “Tech for Good” summit, in Paris, France. VOA

The move follows a meeting with Facebook’s founder Mark Zuckerberg in May, when Macron invited the CEOs of some of the biggest tech firms to Paris, telling them they should work for the common good.

The officials may be seconded from the telecoms regulator and the interior and justice ministries, a government source said. Facebook said the selection was up to the French presidency.

It is unclear whether the group will have access to highly-sensitive material such as Facebook’s algorithms or codes to remove hate speech. It could travel to Facebook’s European headquarters in Dublin and global base in Menlo Park, California, if necessary, the company said.

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This photo shows a Facebook app icon on a smartphone in New York. VOA

“The best way to ensure that any regulation is smart and works for people is by governments, regulators and businesses working together to learn from each other and explore ideas,” Nick Clegg, the former British deputy prime minister who is now head of Facebook’s global affairs, said in a statement.

France’s approach to hate speech has contrasted sharply with Germany, Europe’s leading advocate of privacy.

Also Read: Online Hate Thriving Even After The Recent Hate Crime in The U.S.

Since January, Berlin has required sites to remove banned content within 24 hours or face fines of up to 50 million euros ($56 million). That has led to accusations of censorship.

France’s use of embedded regulators is modeled on what happens in its banking and nuclear industries.

“[Tech companies] now have the choice between something that is smart but intrusive and regulation that is wicked and plain stupid,” a French official said. (VOA)