Tuesday November 20, 2018

Obesity And Smoking: Roadblocks In Arthritis Treatment

Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease

0
//
Obesity And Smoking Becomes Roadblocks In Arthritis Treatment
Obesity And Smoking Becomes Roadblocks In Arthritis Treatment, Pixabay
Republish
Reprint

Obesity in women and smoking among men could be major factors behind not achieving remission in rheumatoid arthritis, despite early treatment, researchers say.

Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease that affects a person’s joints, causing pain and disability and can also affect internal organs.

The study showed that though early identification and aggressive treatment improve arthritis outcomes, six per cent of women and 38 per cent of men did not achieve remission in the first year despite receiving guideline-based care.

“Our results suggest that lifestyle changes — smoking cessation in men and weight reduction in women — as well as optimising methotrexate use may facilitate rapid reduction of inflammation, an essential goal of treatment in early rheumatoid arthritis,” said Susan Bartlett, professor of Medicine at McGill University in Canada.

The study, published in the journal Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, included 1,628 adults with an average age of 55.

The analysis highlighted that obesity more than doubled the likelihood of not achieving remission in women.

obesity
obesity, Pixabay

In men, current smoking was associated with 3.5 greater odds of not achieving remission within the first year.

Further, almost all patients within the study were initially treated with conventional synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (csDMARDs), with three quarters being treated with methotrexate.

Analysis demonstrated that not using methotrexate significantly increased the likelihood of not achieving remission in women by 28 per cent and in men by 45 per cent.

Also read: drug free compound can ease arthritis pain

“These results highlight the need to support physicians and empower patients to take advantage of the impact lifestyle changes can have on disease progression,” Johannes Bijlsma, President, European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR), said in a statement. (IANS)

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2018 NewsGram

Next Story

Longer Exposure to Honking Traffic Makes You Obese

For the study, the researchers involved 3,796 adults and examined body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, body fat, central obesity and overweight

0
Traffic Kolkata, Wikimedia

Are you obese or overweight? Blame long term exposure to blaring horns and other noise from road traffic, said researchers.

The study showed that a 10 decibel (dB) increase in mean noise level was associated with a 17 per cent increase in obesity.

“Our analysis shows that people exposed to the highest levels of traffic noise are at greater risk of being obese” said Maria Foraster, lead researcher from the Barcelona Institute for Global Health in Spain.

It could be because noise generates stress and affects our sleep. It alters hormone levels and increases blood pressure.

Moreover, among other effects, sleep disturbance deregulates glucose metabolism and alters the appetite, the researchers explained in the paper published in the journal Environment International.

Long term exposure to honking traffic can make you obese. Flickr

“In the long term, these effects could give rise to chronic physiological alterations, which would explain the proven association between persistent exposure to traffic-related noise and cardiovascular disease or the more recently discovered associations with diabetes and obesity,” Foraster said.

“Our findings suggest that reducing traffic-related noise could also be a way of combating the obesity epidemic,” he noted.

Also Read- Twitter Confirms Third-Party Involvement in Crypto Hackings

For the study, the researchers involved 3,796 adults and examined body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, body fat, central obesity and overweight.

They also analysed exposure to noise generated by aircraft and railway traffic and found no significant associations except in the case of long-term exposure to railway noise, which was associated with a higher risk of overweight but not of obesity. (IANS)