Wednesday September 26, 2018

Robin Hood Army: Two friends from India and Pakistan fight to defeat Hunger

The project now comprises 400 volunteers who wear green and go out into the streets of around 11 cities distributing food to 2,500 to 3,000 poor and homeless people every night

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Flags of India and Pakistan Image Source: Wikimedia Commons
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  • One-third of the world’s annual food production for human consumption is 1.3bn tonnes, that goes to waste.
  • The objective of RHA is to redistribute surplus food from restaurants and eateries and create self-sustaining societies
  • RHA started in India with endeavors of Neel Ghose who had launched an initiative to feed 150 homeless people of New Delhi in 2014

KARACHI: Two brothers from either side of the border of nations- India and Pakistan, which are in highly unveiled conflict since 1947, consolidated to raise the morale of the countries and fight the common enemy- hunger.

It started in India with endeavors of Neel Ghose who had launched an initiative to feed 150 homeless people of New Delhi in 2014. A few months later, started a new chapter of Robin Hood Army (RHA) in Pakistan when Ghose shared this idea with Sarah Afridi.

RHA ISLAMBAD Image Source: Wikimedia Commons
Robin Hood Army in Islamabad. Image Source: Wikimedia Commons

According to a study conducted by the Food and Agriculture Organization, one-third of the world’s annual food production for human consumption is 1.3bn tonnes, that goes to waste. If efficiently managed, this could feed one in nine of the 7.3 billion people around the world, who go to bed hungry every night, said the Al Jazeera report.

In India, this project now comprises 400 volunteers who wear green and go out into the streets of around 11 cities distributing food to 2,500 to 3,000 poor and homeless people every night.

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The objective is to redistribute surplus food from restaurants and eateries and create self-sustaining societies by distributing surplus food to the lesser-privileged members of society. Some do it for religious cause and some for humanity but this initiative would probably also work in facets other than malnutrition.

RHA-Lahore Launch Image Source: Wikimedia Commons
RHA-Lahore Launch. Image Source: Wikimedia Commons

Youth groups in Karachi, Lahore and Islamabad come out each Sunday and take responsibility on their shoulders to collect surplus produce from food outlets so that they can feed a few hundreds of households in Pakistan.

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The Express Tribune report said, the Robin Hood Army had its first distribution on February 15 – the day Pakistan and India had their opening World Cup match, reminding people of the need to bridge the differences of the two countries.

But who are the people donating for the cause? Sadly, no one but the members of the team are themselves funding the distributions out of their own pocket. However, their aim is to get restaurants on board to donate their surplus food.

The slogan Robin Hood Army said, “We might be on different teams but we are batting for the same side.”

According to aljazeera.com, the Robin Hood Army is present in 23 cities across five countries – Pakistan, India, Bangladesh, Malaysia and Indonesia – with more than 3,000 Robins having served nearly 500,000 people.

-prepared by Pashchiema, an intern at NewsGram. Twitter: @pashchiema

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  • devika todi

    recently, i had the opportunity of attending a lecture given by Neel Ghose. it had been very interesting. he had also talked about the initiative, Robin Hood Army. his passion was clear to the audience. i hope this army spreads to different corners of the world, and help in eradicating hunger, one empty stomach at a time.

Next Story

Samsung Brings its First Smartphone With Triple Camera in India

Samsung is offering cash back worth Rs 2,000 on the smartphone when buyers make payment through HDFC bank credit and debit cards

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Samsung's first triple camera smartphone in India. Flickr

Samsung India on Tuesday launched Galaxy A7 with triple rear cameras for Rs 23,990 in blue, black and gold colours.

The smartphone is slated to be available in over 180,000 outlets by September-end. It will be available on September 27 and 28 during a special preview sale on Flipkart, Samsung e-shop and at Samsung Opera House in Bengaluru.

“We are expecting to disrupt the market and gain significant share specifically in our ‘A Series’. So this is the first triple camera phone that we are bringing to the market which we have not even launched in our flagship segment but the whole idea is to really expand this series,” Mohandeep Singh, Senior Vice President, Mobile Business, Samsung India told IANS.

The Galaxy A7 sports 24MP main + 5MP live focus + 8MP ultra-wide sensors at the rear and a 24 MP selfie shooter.

The device features a 6.0-inch FHD+ super AMOLED Infinity Display and also supports Dolby Atmos immersive sound technology that brings HD content to life.

It has a 2.5D glass back design, 7.5-mm body and a side fingerprint sensor which has been integrated into the power button itself.

Samsung
The device will be available in 6GB RAM+128GB storage and 4GB RAM+64GB storage configurations.

“The new colours and a side fingerprint sensor deliver a refreshed design. We are confident that with this device, we will capture the imagination of the Indian millennial and be able to add to the celebrations during the festive season,” said Sumit Walia, Director, Mobile Business, Samsung India.

Galaxy A7 is powered by a Samsung’s proprietary Exynos 7885 2.2GHz octa-core processor.

The device will be available in 6GB RAM+128GB storage and 4GB RAM+64GB storage configurations.

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The smartphone is powered by a 3300mAh battery and runs Android Oreo operating system (OS).

Samsung is offering cash back worth Rs 2,000 on the smartphone when buyers make payment through HDFC bank credit and debit cards. (IANS)