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Shamanism: The Ultimate Therapy to De-Stress Yourself!

Shamanism is soon catching up with other healing systems like yoga and meditation

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Representational Image. Image source: www.traditionalmedicinals.com
  • Shamanism is an ancient practice that dates back to Neolithic period
  • It is based on the idea that the visible world is often visited by invisible forces
  • An increasing number of female patients are turning to shamanism for healing

Shamanism is a psycho-spiritual transformational therapy for healing, dating back to the Neolithic period. The primary teachings of shamanism are based on human’s connection with nature and revolve around the well-being of each individual.

The word shaman has been derived from the word ‘saman’ in Tungus language in Siberia. It is translated to ‘one who is excited, moved, or raised’ and ‘inner heat.’ It is a known fact that shamanistic practices dominate every organized religion, generally as a part of their mystic and symbolic practices.

It is in the oldest system of consciousness transformation. Other traditional systems of consciousness transformation include yoga and alchemy. However, shamanism is different from these as it works with the soul or spirit.

Shamans are spiritual beings who work as ‘vessel’ and are blessed with the ability to heal, work with energies. It is also believed that they are able to see visions, which are invisible to other humans, said the marieclaire.com Website.

They are also credited with the ability to control the weather, witness spiritual being, interpret dreams, astral projection, and can travel between different dimensions.

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Shamanism is founded on the idea that the visible world is often visited by invisible forces or spirits that interfere with the lives of the beings.

One of the unique aspects of shamanism is ‘journey’. It is said that shamans experience a journey out of their bodies into the mystic world. It is in these outer-body experiences, shamans get healing power from the deities, ancestral spirits, and animals.

The marieclaire.com reported, it is interesting to note that shamanism is soon catching up with other healing systems like yoga and meditation. Speaking to Marie Clarie, Guru Jagat, a kundalini yoga, and meditation teacher, said, “There is a shift happening, a renaissance” that is driving more people to introspect.

Yoga training. Image courtesy: Wikimedia commons
Yoga training. Image courtesy: Wikimedia commons

According to a marieclaire.com report, Vivian Diller, a psychologist, believes that the rising shaman trend has its root in declining interest in religious practices. Diller said, “Millennials are turned off by organized Western religion and are more open to religions based on Eastern philosophy. In a world that is so uncertain, there is still a desire for a sense of control, so some believe a spiritual leader holds potential answers.”

He added that an increasing number of female patients are seeking additional help with spiritual healers as compared to the male patients.

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Over the past few decades, the term ‘shamanism’ has come out as a popular healing mechanism throughout the western world, especially in new-age circles.

A shamanic energy session helps an individual to bring about changes in their behaviors and patterns that aid them in controlling their keep their wants and desires. It has also been established that shamanic energy sessions have been very successful where other healing systems have failed.

Here are some of the benefits associated with a shaman energy session:

  • It is highly motivational and enhances an individual’s ability to create desired life changes
  • Increases optimism and power
  • Heightens the sense of being complete and wellness
  • Enables an individual to kick off addictions and maintain change
  • Strengthens the connection between spiritual source and soul purpose
  • Helps in fighting illness by repairing the immune system

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  • AJ Krish

    Going back to the ancient healing methods seems to be the trend, nowadays. Yet people refuse to seek pride in their own culture!

  • Vrushali Mahajan

    Shamanism should be experimented by all. It gives you immense optimism and motivational power

Next Story

Somalia Still Working on Petroleum Law, Aims Oil Exploration

“No company is going to start drilling without agreement with regions,” says Mohamed. “So why rush? It’s not good for the reputation of the country.”

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Engineers and visitors view an exploratory well near Dharoor town, from the port of Bosasso on the Gulf of Aden in Puntland, Somalia, Jan. 17, 2012. VOA

The Somali government says it will award exploration licenses to foreign oil companies later this year, despite calls from the opposition to wait until laws and regulations governing the oil sector are in place.

Seismic surveys conducted by two British companies, Soma Oil & Gas and Spectrum Geo, suggest that Somalia has promising oil reserves along the Indian Ocean coast, between the cities of Garad and Kismayo. Total offshore deposits could be as high as 100 billion barrels.

 

“We have presented our wealth and resources to the companies,” Petroleum Minister Abdirashid Mohamed Ahmed told the VOA Somali program Investigative Dossier. “We held a roadshow in London [last week], and we will hold two more in two major cities so that we turn the eyes of the world to contest Somalia.”

But several lawmakers have expressed concern the government is moving too quickly. Last week, the head of the National Resource committee in the Upper House of Parliament accused President Mohamed Abdullahi Mohamed’s government of a “lack of due diligence” and violating the constitution.

Barnaby Pace, an investigator for the NGO Global Witness, which exposes corruption and environmental abuses, says Somalia, after decades of internal conflict, does not have the legal and regulatory framework to handle oil deals and the problems they can cause, such as environmental abuses, corruption, and political fights over revenue.

“There is not a clear consensus about how the oil sector could be managed in Somalia,” he said. “And once Somalia makes deals like the one it’s proposing, it may be locked in for many years and find it difficult to renegotiate or change them to best protect itself.”

Former oil officials speak out

Somalia’s parliament passed a Petroleum Law to govern oil sector in 2008 when the country operated under a transitional charter. But constitutional experts say that law was nullified after a constitution was ratified in 2012.

A proposed new law is now before parliament for debate. The bill says negotiations for oil-related contracts will be the responsibility of the Somali Petroleum Agency, which would not be formed until the law is passed.

Ahmed said government’s timetable for awarding licenses is just “tentative,” though he believes the government can keep to its schedule.

The government says it will accept bids for exploration licenses on November 7, and the winners will be informed immediately. It says production-sharing agreements will be signed on December 9, with the agreements going into effect on January 1, 2020.
The government says it will accept bids for exploration licenses on November 7, and the winners will be informed immediately. It says production-sharing agreements will be signed on December 9, with the agreements going into effect on January 1, 2020. VOA

 

But Somali lawmakers and opposition leaders are worried the government is in a needless rush.

Jamal Kassim Mursal was permanent secretary of the Somali Petroleum Ministry until last month when he resigned.

He says when the government came to power in 2017, the ministry was informed that bids for oil exploration licenses would not be considered until the Petroleum Law was passed and “we are ready with the knowledge and skills.”

Since then, he told VOA, “Nothing has changed — petroleum law is not passed, tax law is not ready, capacity has not changed, institutions have not been built.”

Abdirizak Omar Mohamed is the former petroleum minister who signed the 2013 seismic study agreement with Soma Oil & Gas.

Mohamed said the country needs political consensus and stability before oil drilling. He notes that a resource-sharing agreement between the federal government and Somali federal states has yet to be endorsed by the parliament.

“No company is going to start drilling without agreement with regions,” says Mohamed. “So why rush? It’s not good for the reputation of the country.”

Soma and Spectrum’s advantage

Mursal also objects to an agreement that gives first choice of oil exploration blocks to Soma Oil & Gas, one of the companies that conducted the seismic studies.

According to the agreement, Soma Oil & Gas will choose 12 blocks or 60,000 square kilometers to conduct oil exploration. Among these are two blocks believed to contain large oil reserves near the town of Barawe.

He says the government needs to renegotiate and offer just two blocks instead.

“This is the one that is causing the alarm,” he said. He predicts that if Soma Oil & Gas gets to choose 12 blocks, the company will “flip” some of the blocks to the highest bidder.

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Mohamed said the country needs political consensus and stability before oil drilling. He notes that a resource-sharing agreement between the federal government and Somali federal states has yet to be endorsed by the parliament. Pixabay

In 2015, Soma Oil & Gas was caught up in controversy after allegations of quid pro quo payments to the Somali Ministry of Petroleum. The payments were termed as “capacity building.” The following year, Britain’s Serious Fraud Office closed the case because it could not prove that corruption took place.

Somalia’s current prime minister, Hassan Ali Khaire, was working for Soma Oil & Gas at time. Somali officials say that since taking office, Khaire has “relinquished” his stake in the company, said to be more than 2 million shares.

The other company that conducted seismic surveys, Spectrum, also made payments to the Somali Ministry of Finance, according to Mursal.

Mursal told Investigative Dossier that between 2015 and 2017, Spectrum paid $450,000 every six months to the ministry.

A senior official who previously was involved in the Ministry of Petroleum told VOA that Spectrum paid $1.35 million in all. He said the payment was “consistent,” though, with the advice of the Financial Governance Committee, a body consisting on Somali and donors which gives financial advice to Somalia.

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Spectrum has not yet responded to Investigative Dossier requests for an interview.

Current Petroleum Minister Ahmed said the government will do what is best for Somalia, but needs to have a law governing the oil sector in place.

“The parliament has the petroleum law,” he said. “Without it being passed, we can’t touch anything.” (VOA)