Sunday March 24, 2019

Smoking may up risk of hearing loss

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smoking (Source: Wikimedia Commons)
  • There are many harmful effects of smoking
  • Smoking may also lead to a loss of hearing
  • For smokers, it can get difficult to listen to low-frequency sounds

Smokers beware. You may be at a higher risk of suffering hearing loss, as a new study suggests that smoking affects the ability to hear both high and low-frequency sounds.

“These results provide strong evidence to support that smoking is a causal factor for hearing loss and emphasise the need for tobacco control to prevent or delay the development of hearing loss,” said lead author Huanhuan Hu from the National Centre for Global Health and Medicine in Japan.

Other than chronic diseases, lifestyle habits like smoking causes cancer too. Pixabay
Smoking can cause loss of hearing. Pixabay

For the study, published in the journal Nicotine and Tobacco Research, researchers included 50,195 people, aged between 20 to 64 years and free of hearing loss.

The researchers analysed data from annual health checkups, which included audio testing performed by a technician and a health-related lifestyle questionnaire completed by each participant.

Also Read: Stop smoking and eat healthy to avoid obesity

They examined the effects of smoking status (current, former and never smokers), the number of cigarettes smoked per day, and the duration of smoking cessation on the extent of hearing loss. The participants were followed up for a maximum of eight years.

Even after adjusting for factors including occupational noise exposure, researchers noted a 1.2 to 1.6 increased risk of hearing loss among current smokers compared with never smokers.

Smoking causes failure of Dental fillings
Smokers are at higher risk of losing their ability to listen low-frequency sounds. Pixabay

During follow-up, 3,532 individuals developed high-frequency hearing loss, and 1,575 developed low-frequency hearing loss. While the association between smoking and high-frequency hearing loss was stronger than that of low-frequency hearing loss, the risk of both high and low-frequency hearing loss increased with cigarette consumption, the researcher said.

The increased risk of hearing loss decreased within five years after quitting smoking, the researcher added. “With a large sample size, long follow-up period, and objective assessment of hearing loss, our study provides strong evidence that smoking is an independent risk factor of hearing loss,” Hu said. IANS

Next Story

Passive Smoking May Raise The Chances of Kidney Disease

The global health body states that of the seven million lives that tobacco claims worldwide each year, almost 900,000 are passive-smokers

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Besides affecting your heart and lungs, exposure to second-hand or passive smoking can also raise the chances of chronic kidney disease (CKD), which can lead to renal failure, warns a new study.

The findings showed that individuals with less or more than 3 days of exposure per week had nearly double the risk of having kidney disease when compared with participants with no second-hand cigarette exposure.

“Second-hand smoke exposure at home or in the workplace is still prevalent despite legislative actions prohibiting public smoking,” said Jung Tak Park from Yonsei University in Seoul.

“This exposure was found to be clearly related with CKD, even with less-frequent amounts of second-hand smoke exposure,” Park added.

Smoking pregnant lady outside hospital.

For the study, published in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, the team included 131,196 non-smokers and were classified into three groups: no-exposure, less than three days per week of exposure, and three or more days per week of exposure.

Cigarette smoking and exposure to second-hand smoking have been linked with higher risks of various diseases.

Also Read- Alzheimer’s Drug Holds Promise For Rare Neurological Disease, Suggest Researchers

According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), smoking tobacco is globally the second leading cause of heart diseases after high blood pressure.Nearly 12 per cent of cardiovascular deaths worldwide occur due to tobacco abuse and second-hand smoking.

The global health body states that of the seven million lives that tobacco claims worldwide each year, almost 900,000 are passive-smokers. (IANS)