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South Africa holds walk in honour of Mahatma Gandhi

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By NewsGram Staff Writer

Mahatma Gandhi has his share of followers not only in India but in South Africa, the place where he practised law and formulated the philosophy of Satyagraha, or non-violent resistance.

This was aptly clear from the horde of crowd, close to 3000 people that turned up for the annual charity walk organised in commemoration of the Mahatma in Johannesburg.

The latest edition of the walk marked the double celebration of the 30th anniversary of the walk and the centenary of Gandhi’s return to India from South Africa.

The celebrations of the Gandhi Walk hosted in the sprawling Indian township of Lenasia, south of here, saw participation from ministers, beauty queens and media personalities.

The Mayor of Johannesburg, Parks Tau, and Indian High Commissioner Ruchi Ghanashyam were also in attendance.

The star attraction at the event, however, were two Gandhi look-alikes clad in the traditional dhoti worn by the iconic Indian leader. Looking the perfect picture of the aged Gandhi, 80-year-old Thakor Ramjee travelled 600 km to join the event.

Two trees were also planted on the premise of the Gandhi Hall in Lenasia to mark the milestone events.

The walk was originally started as a fundraiser to complete the community hall named after the iconic leader.After the completion of the project, the event continued to raise funds for a variety of charitable and welfare organisations.

The walk was followed by an all-day entertainment Mela of Indian and South African dance and songs.

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Rural Traditional Artists Bring Out The Unique Interpretation Of Gandhi

The artists represent traditional art forms: Warli art, Gond art, North East weaving, Pattachitra art, Papier Mache art, Tanjore art, Sanjhi craft, Pattua art, and Kalamkari art, among others.

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Mahatma Gandhi
Mahatma Gandhi Spinning Charkha. Wikimedia

Gandhi, who has always inspired Indian art and literature, is the focal point of an exhibition of traditional art depicting various events of his life by rural artisans.

Developed for the Export-Import Bank of India (Exim Bank) and exhibited at the Nehru Memorial Museum and Library here starting Wednesday, these 25 paintings are a unique interpretation of Gandhi’s life.

“The three monkeys, which is a pictorial maxim of ‘see no evil, hear no evil, speak no evil,’ was one of the favourite themes of the artists and it was manifested in several paintings of the Gond artists who worked on the project,” said Vikramaditya Ugra, Bank’s General Manager.

Bharat Jodo Campaign
Quit India Movement ” , photo at Gandhi Memorial , Sabarmati Ashram , Ahamadabad. Wikimedia Commons

Also Read:We Need To Return To Gandhian Art Of Dialogue

“All the paintings have a story to tell and the artists worked for over two months on them,” said Ugra.

The artists represent traditional art forms: Warli art, Gond art, North East weaving, Pattachitra art, Papier Mache art, Tanjore art, Sanjhi craft, Pattua art, and Kalamkari art, among others.

It is open for public viewing in Delhi till Saturday, after which the exhibition will travel to Pune, Ahmedabad, Kolkata and Mumbai.(IANS)