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Thousands of protesters gather for Not My President Rallies to oppose the Donald Trump administration

The Not My President Rallies have demonstrators gathering across the country to support people of color, immigrants, Muslims, workers, LGBTQ people, and the poor.

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A man stands in front of Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C., with a message against President Trump on Presidents' Day, Feb. 20, 2017. (Sama Dizayee/VOA Kurdish)

New York, Feb 21, 2017: Thousands of protesters rallied nationwide to oppose the Trump administration during Monday’s President’s Day holiday.

The Not My President Rallies have demonstrators gathering across the country to support people of color, immigrants, Muslims, workers, LGBTQ people, and the poor.

Events were underway from Boston to Seattle where protesters said they hoped to make it an anti-Trump day. A list of cities on the Not My President’s Day Facebook page showed at least 30 cities where protests inspired by the national movement of Bad Dudes and Nasty Women took place.

A man wearing a Donald Trump costume participates in a rally in New York, Feb. 20, 2017.
A man wearing a Donald Trump costume participates in a rally in New York, Feb. 20, 2017. VOA

Several hundred people gathered in Washington, shouting “Dump Trump.”

In Chicago, hundreds gathered near Trump Tower, holding signs in English, Arabic and Spanish calling for resistance to Trump’s immigration policy.

A woman marching in Los Angeles said she was marching for her parents who have worked hard “to provide for us.”

Protesters stand on the steps of Los Angeles City Hall, Feb. 20, 2017.
Protesters stand on the steps of Los Angeles City Hall, Feb. 20, 2017. VOA

Protesters stand on the steps of Los Angeles City Hall, Feb. 20, 2017.

Another demonstrator in Dallas, Texas, said people were angry.

“There’s a lot of stuff going on and it’s only been a month, and it’s kind of scary for a lot of people because a lot of people are actually being affected by what’s going on,” she said.

“I’m here to protest everything that 45 [45th U.S. president] stands for … From his views on women to his views on immigration, racism, sexism and all the awful things that he is representing is embarrassing our country,” another protester said.

In one month of presidency, Trump has signed 24 executive orders and memoranda including orders withdraw the United States from the Trans-Pacific trade deal, impose a federal hiring freeze, and temporarily ban travelers from seven Muslim nations.That order was blocked by federal judges.

Most students, school employees and government workers had Monday off work because of the federal holiday.

Geoffrey Supran, a postdoctoral fellow at Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, studies renewable energy solutions to climate change. He said scientists are trying to send a message to President Trump that America “runs on science.”

“Science is the backbone of our prosperity and progress,” Supran said.

Demonstrators, some dressed in while lab coats, held signs that read “Science Matters,” “Scientists Pursuing Truth, Saving the World” and “Make America Smart Again.”

The Rally to Stand Up for Science in Boston’s Copley Square was held outside the American Association for the Advancement of Science’s annual meeting.

Saturday, Trump held a large rally in Florida with about 9,000 supporters gathered in an airport hangar in Melbourne.

President Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally in Melbourne, Florida, Feb. 18, 2017.
President Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally in Melbourne, Florida, Feb. 18, 2017. VOA

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They loudly cheered Trump’s comments. While anti-Trump protests are continuously across the country, the president’s fiercest backers echoed his message.

“He is right on point, because, unfortunately, most of the news media distorts it and twists it [the news] to their benefit,” said Hamilton Campos, who attended Trump’s rally Saturday.“You know, they were hoping that Hillary [Clinton] was going to win and she did not.”(VOA)

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AI Couldn’t Catch NZ Attack Video Streaming: Facebook

Facebook said it was exploring how AI could help it react faster to this kind of content on a live streamed video

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This photograph taken on May 16, 2018, shows a figurine standing in front of the logo of social network Facebook on a cracked screen of a smartphone in Paris. VOA

Facing flak for failure to block the live broadcast of the New Zealand terrorist attack last week, Facebook on Thursday said that its Artificial Intelligence (AI) tools were not “perfect” to detect the horrific video.

Vowing to improve its technology, the social networking giant, however, ruled out adding a time delay to Facebook Live, similar to the broadcast delay sometimes used by TV stations.

“There are millions of Live broadcasts daily, which means a delay would not help address the problem due to the sheer number of videos,” Guy Rosen, Facebook’s Vice President of Integrity, said in a statement.

“More importantly, given the importance of user reports, adding a delay would only further slow down videos getting reported, reviewed and first responders being alerted to provide help on the ground,” Rosen added.

Strapped with a GoPro camera to his head, the gunman broadcast graphic footage of the New Zealand shooting via Facebook Live for 17 minutes, which was later shared in millions on other social media platforms, including Twitter and YouTube.

Fifty people were killed and dozens injured in the shootings at Al Noor Mosque and the Linwood Avenue Masjid in Christchurch on March 15 after 28-year-old Australian Brenton Tarrant opened indiscriminate firings.

Facebook, data, vietnam
This photo shows a Facebook app icon on a smartphone in New York. VOA

The circulation of the video on social media platforms attracted widespread criticism from different quarters.

In a letter to CEOs of Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Microsoft, House Homeland Security Committee Chairman Bennie Thompson asked the technology companies to brief the US Congress on March 27 regarding their response to dissemination of the video on their platforms.

Thompson also warned the technology companies that unless they do better in removing violent content, the Congress could consider policies to bar such content on social media.

Also Read- Finland Probing Nokia Phones Sending Data to China

Facebook on Thursday said it was exploring how AI could help it react faster to this kind of content on a live streamed video.

“AI has made massive progress over the years and in many areas, which has enabled us to proactively detect the vast majority of the content we remove. But it’s not perfect.

“However, this particular video did not trigger our automatic detection systems,” Rosen said, referring to the New Zealand attack video. (IANS)