Monday February 18, 2019

Traditional Indian diet has the power to cut risks related to Alzheimer’s Disease

Fruits, vegetables, grains, low-fat dairy products, legumes, and fish are associated with reduced risk of Alzheimer's disease, the study said

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Spice market India. Image source: Wikimedia Commons

New York, August 27, 2016: While consumption of meat, sweets, and high-fat dairy products that characterise a Western diet significantly increases the risk of Alzheimer’s disease, traditional Indian diet is associated with reduced risk of the most common form of dementia, says a study.

“Although the traditional Mediterranean diet is associated with about half the risk for Alzheimer’s disease of the Western diet, the traditional diets of countries such as India, Japan, and Nigeria, with very low meat consumption, are associated with an additional 50 percent reduction in risk of Alzheimer’s disease,” said study author William B Grant from Sunlight, Nutrition and Health Research Center in San Francisco, California.

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Fruits, vegetables, grains, low-fat dairy products, legumes, and fish are associated with reduced risk of Alzheimer’s disease, the study said.

To determine dietary risk factors for Alzheimer’s disease, the researcher reviewed journal literature.

Indian food. Image source: Wikimedia Commons
Indian food. Image source: Wikimedia Commons

Besides, an ecological study was also conducted using Alzheimer’s disease prevalence data from 10 countries including India along with dietary supply data 5, 10, and 15 years before the prevalence data.

The other countries from which data was taken include Brazil, Chile, Cuba, Egypt, Mongolia, Nigeria, Republic of Korea, Sri Lanka and the US.

Dietary supply of meat or animal products (minus milk) five years before Alzheimer’s disease prevalence had the highest correlations with Alzheimer’s disease prevalence in this study published in the Journal of the American College of Nutrition.

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The study discussed the specific risk each country and region faces for developing Alzheimer’s disease based on their associated dietary habits.

Residents of the US seem to be at particular risk, with each person having about a four per cent chance of developing Alzheimer’s disease, likely due in part to the Western dietary pattern, which tends to include a large amount of meat consumption.

“Reducing meat consumption could significantly reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s disease as well as of several cancers, diabetes mellitus Type-2, stroke, and, likely, chronic kidney disease,” Grant noted. (IANS)

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Do You Have A Sweet Tooth? Know How High-Calorie Desserts Can Lead to Healthier Meals

Choosing these high-calorie options first might help you opt for a healthier meal later, says a new research.

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We believe diners who chose the indulgent dessert first then picked healthier main and side dishes to make up for their high-calorie dessert. Pixabay

Do red velvet cheesecake, french fries or fish fries entice you but you refrain from eating those owing to the high-calories they contain? Take heart.

Choosing these high-calorie options first might help you opt for a healthier meal later, says a new research.

The study showed choosing indulgent dessert first may lead to eating lower-calorie meals.

“We believe diners who chose the indulgent dessert first then picked healthier main and side dishes to make up for their high-calorie dessert.

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Choosing these high-calorie options first might help you opt for a healthier meal later, says a new research. Pixabay

“Diners who picked the healthier dessert may have thought they already had done a good deed for their bodies so they deserved higher-calorie food further down the cafeteria line,” said Martin Reimann, Assistant Professor at the University of Arizona in the US.

The experiment was conducted in the cafeteria of the EGADE Business School at the Tecnológico de Monterrey in Monterrey, Mexico.

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Diners who picked the healthier dessert may have thought they already had done a good deed for their bodies. Pixabay

For the study, researchers included 134 diners aged between 18 and 60 with an average age of 32.

They placed either a healthy or less healthy dessert (fresh fruit versus lemon cheesecake).

There were also healthy and less healthy main and side dishes including grilled chicken fajitas and a small salad or fried fish and french fries.

Also Read: Lack Of Data Privacy Makes India Unprepared To Deal With Misuse of Technology
The findings, published by the American Psychological Association, showed that diners who chose the cheesecake first, were twice as likely to order the lighter main dish later and ultimately consumed fewer calories than diners who chose the fresh fruit first.

“People should be aware that their initial food choices and their mindset may affect the overall healthiness of their meals,” suggested Reimann. (IANS)