Wednesday February 20, 2019

Women suffering from Urinary Incontinence are at a Higher Risk of it getting worse after Childbirth: Study

According to the study, women who have not given birth are less likely to suffer from urinary incontinence compared to pregnant women

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Pregnant woman. Pixabay

London, November 10, 2016: Women who suffer from urinary incontinence are at a higher risk of it getting worse after childbirth, a study suggests.

According to the study, women who have not given birth are less likely to suffer from urinary incontinence compared to pregnant women.

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“Those who have urinary incontinence before a pregnancy are at higher risk of getting significantly worse after childbirth. This is a particularly vulnerable group and should, therefore, be attended to and counselled in antenatal care, and should be identified in maternal health,” said Maria Gyhagen, Researcher at the Gothenburg University, Sweden.

The study, published in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, involved about 9,200 women aged 25-64 years who had never given birth. In the category of young women (25-35 years) with normal weight (BMI up to 25), 10 per cent said they had urinary incontinence.

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Among the oldest in the study (55-64 years) with a BMI over 35, almost every other woman experienced this type of incontinence. Seventeen per cent of women over 55 said they had to get up and urinate at least twice every night.

For those who reported incontinence, 25-30 per cent experienced their incontinence as bothersome.

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“The original purpose of the study was to measure the effects of pregnancy in itself and the potential protective effect of caesarean section. At the same time, we have collected the world’s first and most detailed data for this particular reference group,” Maria added.

The study confirms that problems are found in all groups, and that women have a weakness of the pelvic floor even if they have not previously given birth. (IANS)

Next Story

New Medicine That Could Replace Insulin Injections

The tip of the needle is made of nearly 100 per cent compressed, freeze-dried insulin. 

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diabities
The tip of the needle is made of nearly 100 per cent compressed, freeze-dried insulin. Pixabay

Researchers have developed a drug capsule that could be used to deliver oral doses of insulin, potentially replacing injections for patients with Type-2 diabetes, says a new study.

About the size of a blueberry, the capsule contains a single and small needle made of compressed insulin, which is injected after the capsule reaches the stomach.

The study showed that the capsule could deliver enough insulin to lower blood sugar to levels comparable to those produced by injections given through skin. They also demonstrated that the device can be adapted to deliver other protein drugs.

diabities
About the size of a blueberry, the capsule contains a single and small needle made of compressed insulin, which is injected after the capsule reaches the stomach. VOA

“We are really hopeful that this new type of capsule could someday help diabetic patients and perhaps anyone who requires therapies that can now only be given by injection or infusion,” said Robert Langer, Professor at the Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research in Britain.

The tip of the needle is made of nearly 100 per cent compressed, freeze-dried insulin.

When the capsule is swallowed, water in the stomach dissolves the sugar disk, releasing the spring and injecting the needle into the stomach wall.

The stomach wall has no pain receptors, so the patients would not be able to feel the prick of the injection. To ensure that the drug is injected into the stomach wall, the researchers designed their system so that no matter how the capsule lands in the stomach, it can orient itself so the needle is in contact with the lining of the stomach.

The findings, published in the journal Science, showed that the researchers could successfully deliver up to 300 micrograms of insulin.

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The type of drug delivery could be useful for any protein drug that normally has to be injected, such as immunosuppressants used to treat rheumatoid arthritis or inflammatory bowel disease and may also work for nucleic acids such as DNA and RNA, according to the researchers. Pixabay

More recently, they have been able to increase the dose to 5 milligrams, which is comparable to the amount that a patient with Type-2 diabetes would need to inject.

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Furthermore, no adverse effects from the capsule was found, which is made from biodegradable polymer and stainless steel components.

Importantly, this type of drug delivery could be useful for any protein drug that normally has to be injected, such as immunosuppressants used to treat rheumatoid arthritis or inflammatory bowel disease and may also work for nucleic acids such as DNA and RNA, according to the researchers. (IANS)